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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,
I have the stock rear shock on my Versys-X 300. The only adjustment it has are 5 preload settings. I'll call "1" the lowest preload, and "5" the highest. I weigh 80 kg (176 lbs). For the last several months I have been riding around with the rear preload on the "2" setting.
Today, I reduced it back to "1," and found an improvement. The ride was more compliant and less bumpy.

If you are around my weight, what preload setting do you favor? I thought a "1" would be too soft, but it's far better than I expected.

If you are on a "2" or a "3" I recommend you try the "1" and let us know what you think.

PS. The roads in the North Island of New Zealand are fairly lumpy and give suspensions a good workout.
 

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Like the person with the wobble, you need to set it for your weight. As you lighten the rear shock preload it also
takes weight of the front wheel which can cause problems. Wobbles for one, but also a loose front tire in curves..
Play with it, you will see. I know you have seen a truck with the rear loaded down and the front tires go up. Put air shocks, air bags, or overload springs on it and as the back goes up the front goes back down.
 

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Like the person with the wobble, you need to set it for your weight. As you lighten the rear shock preload it also
takes weight of the front wheel which can cause problems. Wobbles for one, but also a loose front tire in curves..
Play with it, you will see. I know you have seen a truck with the rear loaded down and the front tires go up. Put air shocks, air bags, or overload springs on it and as the back goes up the front goes back down.
I intended to say that the front end goes up not the front tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cuz im such a hard ass, all the way turned up! DOH!
View attachment 191591

I think it is about halfway actually. so like 4-5 clicks??.
See my comment above. "The roads in the North Island of New Zealand are fairly lumpy and give suspensions a good workout."
Maybe the roads where you live are like race tracks, compared with our New Zealand goat tracks... (Do you have tar corrugations on your hair pins? We do. They suck.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There appears to be some confusion between preload and damping (compression and rebound) in this thread.

Preload is there to set the loaded bike at the optimal static sag so the geometry of the bike is maintained.

The compression and rebound damping are what is adjusted based on road conditions.
The Versys-X 300 doesn't have any damping (compression and rebound) adjustment on either the forks or the rear shock. Only preload on the rear. You can modify the dampening ability of the forks by changing the viscosity of the fork oil, or by fitting emulators (see my thread about it) to suppress the hydraulic lock from the primitive damper rods in the forks. (The slow-speed dampening of the stock forks is adequate, but the high-speed dampening is poor.)
 

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The Versys-X 300 doesn't have any damping (compression and rebound) adjustment on either the forks or the rear shock. Only preload on the rear. You can modify the dampening ability of the forks by changing the viscosity of the fork oil, or by fitting emulators (see my thread about it) to suppress the hydraulic lock from the primitive damper rods in the forks. (The slow-speed dampening of the stock forks is adequate, but the high-speed dampening is poor.)
I was making a general statement about preload, and damping. Sounds like a new shock is needed for those who have to create additional static sag to compensate for lack of damping adjustment.
 
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