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Checking on wear on my nearly new front tire> Michelin PR-2, I noticed that I've put the wheel on arse-backwards! I have ridden about 1200 km on it, it handled fine in all kinds of weather including 200 km of rain.

I will reverse it today, hope the tire doesn't cup as a result. Also some concern about discs/brake pads. I can't believe I did such an elementary stupid move.
 

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Wow - good catch. Reminds me of a story I heard some time ago about two Maine carpenters who weren't the brightest bulbs.

They went to a local lumber yard to buy some two by fours but didn't tell the guy behind the counter what length. When ask how long, they said, "Oh, a long time. We're building a garage." :D
 

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Is it really that big a deal? I mean, the wheel is symmetrical, is it not? Sure, there's an arrow, but what's the difference? Maybe I'm the one who is stupid?
:confused:
 

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Just my guess but I think it has to do with the orientation of the belts.
Many cars I can't afford have directional tires.
Probably makes no difference at the average skill level on the street.
 

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The wheel is symmetrical but the tire is directional so that when the road's wet it best channels water away from the tire to keep you from hydroplanning. The point of the 'v' should be what contacts the road first. This would not apply to tires with straight ridges but does to the ones with an angled pattern and the arrow on the side to indicate the correct rotation. I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The wheel also has directional arrow so it must be important to have both tire and wheel correctly orientated. I knew all that and still missed it! Might have been some beer involved in that garage session, it has been known to happen.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The wheel is symmetrical but the tire is directional so that when the road's wet it best channels water away from the tire to keep you from hydroplanning. The point of the 'v' should be what contacts the road first. This would not apply to tires with straight ridges but does to the ones with an angled pattern and the arrow on the side to indicate the correct rotation. I think.
Actually, the front tire treads are reversed from the rear tire tread direction (the "v" is at the back, that's why I noticed it was installed wrong), but yes, they are designed that way for the sipes to channel water out of the way.
 

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Checking on wear on my nearly new front tire> Michelin PR-2, I noticed that I've put the wheel on arse-backwards! I have ridden about 1200 km on it, it handled fine in all kinds of weather including 200 km of rain.

I will reverse it today, hope the tire doesn't cup as a result. Also some concern about discs/brake pads. I can't believe I did such an elementary stupid move.
I BELIEVE you are right referencing the brakes as the reason to keep it going ONE way. I used a black marker on those little arrows on the wheel so they'd stand out better for these old eyes....

Is it really that big a deal? I mean, the wheel is symmetrical, is it not? Sure, there's an arrow, but what's the difference? Maybe I'm the one who is stupid?
:confused:
See above POSSIBLE answer....
:goodluck:
 

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Anybody who referenced the direction-ality of the tire missed the point- I get that. The WHEELS however, have an arrow indicating the preferred direction of rotation, as several have pointed out. What if you installed the tire "backwards" on the wheel, and then install it rotating against the wheel's arrow, which is what I understood that the OP did?

Can anyone explain how running a brake disc in the opposite direction effects the performance, if it's perfectly symmetrical? I just don't see how it matters. But, I'm willing to be persuaded. :)
 

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Anybody who referenced the direction-ality of the tire missed the point- I get that. The WHEELS however, have an arrow indicating the preferred direction of rotation, as several have pointed out. What if you installed the tire "backwards" on the wheel, and then install it rotating against the wheel's arrow, which is what I understood that the OP did? Maybe not-


Can anyone explain how running a brake disc in the opposite direction effects the performance, if it's perfectly symmetrical? I just don't see how it matters. But, I'm willing to be persuaded. :)
 

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The wheel and rotors assembly can be reversed without any problem, as long as the tire is rotating in the proper direction... So if the tire is installed backwards on the rim, just install the wheel in reversed rotation.
 

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Weird, my wheel and tyre are mounted the right way, but the tyre appears to go the wrong way. The groves appear to channel the water into the middle of the tyre with no-where for it to go.

 

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Brake pads have a wear pattern to the disc they run on. Rotating the wheel will run the disc with the opposite side brake pads. Most of the time is works ok, sometimes you may experience lesser braking efficientcy untill the pads bed themselves in again.
 

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I noticed the other day that the tread pattern on the front looks backward from what you would think would channel water outward. The rear tire is opposite. After looking online, this seems to be the norm. There must be some physics going on here that I can't wrap my head around.


OEM Rear





OEM Front
 
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