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Discussion Starter #1
I saw this on another board and thought I'd share.

For Winter Riders Only
by William Girolamo

You know it’s cold out when it takes you longer to dress for the ride than it does to take the ride.

You know it’s cold out when you’d rather spend Sunday afternoon watching an old Jerry Lewis movie than riding your bike.

You know it’s cold out when it’s Saturday afternoon, you have nothing to do, your bike is out in the garage filthy, and you have no intention of going out to clean it.

You know it’s cold out when you have to heat a bucket of water up on the stove before going out to wash your bike.

You know it’s cold out when you have to come inside every five minutes to thaw out your hands while you are washing your bike.

You know it’s cold out when you want to lube your chain, but the lube won’t come out of the can.

You know it’s cold out when you can’t throw your leg over the saddle because you have too many layers of clothing on.

You know it’s cold out when your electric starter sounds like a Waring blender trying to mix a cup full of cement.

You know it’s cold out when you can fully appreciate the fact that you were able to start your machine before the battery went dead.

You know it’s cold out when you pull in the clutch, shift into first, and the bike jumps forward three feet.

You know it’s cold out when your boots are so thick that you can’t fit your foot under the shift lever to upshift.

You know it’s really cold out when the feeling in your hands and feet is just a fond memory.

You know it’s really cold out when your hands develop an intimate relationship with the hotter parts of your engine at every stop light.

You know it’s really cold out when 40 MPH brings on Excedrin headache number 13.

You know it’s extremely cold out when you’re coming to a stop light and you have to concentrate really hard on getting your feet off the pegs and onto the ground.

You know it’s extremely cold out when the light turns green, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

You know it’s extremely cold out when you envy the guy sitting in the car next to you.

You know it’s extremely cold out when for a fleeting instant you feel that four wheels are in fact better than two.

You know it’s incredibly cold out when you’ve been riding for a good two hours, glance at your watch and realize that it’s only been twenty minutes.

You know it’s incredibly cold out when every biker on the road waves to every other biker, regardless of brand or displacement.

You know it’s incredibly cold out when you want to wave to the other biker but you can’t separate your hand from the grip.

You know it’s incredibly cold out when a ride consists of short runs between coffee shops.

You know it’s incredibly cold out when you’re trying not to breathe because your breath keeps fogging up your face shield.

You know it’s unbelievably cold out when you decide that a windshield and fairing are the greatest accessories ever designed for a motorcycle.

You know it’s unbelievably cold out when your ride is over and you’ve got to get someone to come out and help you pry your fingers loose from the handle bars.

You know it’s unbearably cold out when you want to shoot anyone who so much as mentions the word winter with anything other than a tone of disgust in his voice.

You know it’s ridiculously cold out when that miserable, uncomfortable, torturous, ass-freezing ride was the high point of your week and you can’t wait for a chance to get out there again and freeze your buns off.
 

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Forgot to take off my glasse & open the face shield before walking into the house after a 15 deg ride. Shield frosted & froze to the helmet almost instantly.
 

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None of the "washing" stuff applies to me, I don't wash in the winter.
My commute is 25 minutes, it does take me nearly that long to get dressed and undressed every day.
I know of only one other guy around me that rides all year, all weather, he rides some kind of cruiser and wears military camo Gortex coveralls. We've passed each other going opposite directions many a day. I've wanted to turn around, chase him down and shake his hand, I probably will someday.
My hat's off to the scooter guys. I see a lot of scooters on the roads long after most motorcycles are on battery chargers.
I would like to add another line to the list.
You know it's cold when you get off the bike and ice crumbles off your gloves. I've had that happen twice on my way to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Freddy I stole it like I posted! ;)

Worst ride that I ever did was in Indy. My heated gear died about 25 miles from home...it was 15. I was on my Buell and there was no windshield at all and I swear I had to ride across Siberia to get home. I was shaking so bad I could hardly get the key in the door at home.

BUT I learned, I will NEVER trust heated gear again...I ALWAYS take extra gear in the bags and the little "Heat Packs" in case that heated junk take's a dump on me! :eek:
 

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I got hypothermia while (inflatable) kayaking the Grande Ronde River in N.E. Oregon a very log time ago..and once when my car broke down in Montana during a snow storm...It's not a lot of fun...I've got heated gear..NEVER again...

:cheers:
 

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I got hypothermia while (inflatable) kayaking the Grande Ronde River in N.E. Oregon a very log time ago..and once when my car broke down in Montana during a snow storm...It's not a lot of fun...I've got heated gear..NEVER again...

:cheers:
Lost count of incidents while diving...the stage just before you doze off is kind of interesting. Re-warming can also prove fatal.
 

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been hypothermic before from a bad fishing trip - when you are so cold that you stop shivering and are struggling not to fall asleep... danger zone. sat in my truck with the heat blasting for a good 30 minutes before I started shivering again.
 

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Back in the 70,s,, i was leaving work one nite and got cought by an ice storm &*%#
i road the bus to and from work for the rest of the week.
Try jumping in to a hot bath after that kind of a ride ---- PIN`s and NEEDLES
Now I am a wossie,, i check with NOAH weather before my ride
 

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Hot water and hypothermia are a bad mix.
Your body reduces blood flow the the extremites in order to keep the heat in your core.
When you warm up too quickly all that cold blood moves to the core & brain...next stop is cardiac arrrest. Hypothermic victims should be warmed slowly. Then you're just slightly itchy for a while. My wife is surprised every time I make it through another winter without something falling off.
 
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