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RIP. maybe we should have ground metal strip or a chain on the bike to earth the current.
From everything I've read about this incident, the loss of control and crash caused his death, not the lightning strike directly.

This seems to match other lightning strike incidents on motorcycles. Usually, the rider survives the strike and recovers as long as they don't crash.
 

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Back in high school a fellow student went to take his bike home and got hit by lightning. He said it skipped off the ground and hit his helmet. I think it went the other way, helmet to ground. His body was insulated from ground by the tires so it skipped off. It had not started raining yet when it happened. It turned his rebel flag metal flake helmet into a flat gray, aluminum color.
 

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Tire Rubber Conductive

Back in high school a fellow student went to take his bike home and got hit by lightning. He said it skipped off the ground and hit his helmet. I think it went the other way, helmet to ground. His body was insulated from ground by the tires so it skipped off. It had not started raining yet when it happened. It turned his rebel flag metal flake helmet into a flat gray, aluminum color.
FYI all tires have some carbon black in them which is highly conductive, there is good reason for this, static electricity, imagine getting out of your car and getting a jolt, same goes for a motorcycle. If you have ever seen a Van de Graaff generator , you will know that if you become charged and point at someone they will receive a charge. In the case of a lightning strike, you are at the charge of the earth and the highest point towards the opposite charge, at one time there was a map from Environment Canada, showing strikes to earth and discharges from earth, now they show danger areas.Environment Canada gives advice on their site.
https://weather.gc.ca/lightning/index_e.html?id=NAT#mapTop

Also worldwide;
https://www.lightningmaps.org/?lang=en#y=25.591;x=22.2168;z=3;t=3;m=oss;r=0;s=0;o=0;b=;n=0;d=2;dl=2;dc=0;ts=0;
 

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Back in high school a fellow student went to take his bike home and got hit by lightning. He said it skipped off the ground and hit his helmet. I think it went the other way, helmet to ground. His body was insulated from ground by the tires so it skipped off. It had not started raining yet when it happened. It turned his rebel flag metal flake helmet into a flat gray, aluminum color.
It could have come from the ground.
 

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When I lived in Florida I have had lightning strike within 50 feet on numerous occasions.

One time I was sitting on my helmet in an alcove waiting for the storm to pass and it hit the nearest telephone pole and rung my ears.

My Brother in Law was killed about 10 years ago when he and my sister were struck while walking in a park.

I take lightning storms very seriously.
 

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On my first ride to Alaska back in '04 (on my Bandit 1200S) a BIG thunderstorm happened when we were heading NW from Grande Prairie, Alberta. There was NO place to stop, so we motored along, watching lightning strikes hitting BOTH sides of the road.

PRETTY scary!

:eek:
 

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The news always likes to say you have a better chance of getting struck by lightning than winning the lottery. I think that's pretty obvious to anyone who has ever been outside in a lightning storm. I feel for his family.
 
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