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I know the traditional way to scrub-in new tires is to ride them for 100+ miles very carefully to get the mould release off them before hitting the corners too hard.

I read somewhere how to treat them for instant grip - was it sandpaper and white spirit? :feedback:

I have the new Angels in the garage and won't have them fitted till next weekend. :teetertooter:
 

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I have done that today Big, (new Pirelli Angels fitted) just did a semi quick run through my local national park. The angels make a hell of a difference to the oem Dunlops.
In all honestly tho the scrub in process was easy, just ride normally and don't go over gassing it through corners, they didn't flinch once even when i was cranked over a fair way.
I still have about 1/2 an inch of chicken strips on the back, and the front ones (the tread seem to go round the tire a fair way) probably over an inch left.
 

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100 miles is way more than needed. Just go out for a nice easy going ride, take left and right turns at a normal pace. 20 miles or so and the tires are fine.
 

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take it easy for the first few miles, dont ask to much of the tyres till you have got them properly warmed up.

that measn not accelerating or braking harshly
not really leaning in on the corners.

once they get to heat most of the crap should disappear.

although I'd agree 100 miles is probably overkill, but I wouldn't like to put my name to anything less..
after say 10..25 start loading the tyre a bit more, make certain you go for a longish ride, to put sustained heat into the tyre and you should be OK
 

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I wipe mine down with mineral spirits (white spirits?) after mounted to remove most of the mold release material. Then I bed the tires in as Healdem recommends.
 

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I just head out to a back road, check for any traffic, then ride in a weaving pattern for 20 minutes or so (push left bar, push right... like that!)
:goodidea:
 

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No mold release, no chemicals, no nothing. The tire is just too smooth to generate the normal levels of traction. You get traction from the mechanical friction the tire generates with the road. If it's smooth/cold/greasy you have less traction. So, you need to heat the tire so that the rubber can wear well, you need to generate some friction to wear the smooth stuff and you don't want to generate so much heat so that the oils that are in the rubber don't make their way to the surface and ruin the party (think track day tire look).

You'll find most manufacturers say in their literature that you need about 100 miles to achieve the right level of "scrubbing". After I figured out that new tires are ready to go race pace (OK, at my race pace ;)) after one lap, I tested this on my street bike. My tires are ready for normal riding after a quite ride up curvy local road from my house (total of 10 miles) of progressively leaning it in to the nice curves. I've done this in the rain too, BTW, no problems.

I suspect that if you are a smooth rider and keep in mind that you can't do any emergency maneuvers in the first 10 miles, no special loop is needed. Just ride the bike smoothly and let it lean in to the turns without pushing too hard. If you don't have a nice set of twisties near by to help with the scrubbing, just zigzag in your lane (start with small angles first, heat up the tires and start slowly increasing the countersteering force so that the angle gets steeper) after the few miles to heat the tires up should also do the trick.


Gustavo
 

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No mold release, no chemicals, no nothing. The tire is just too smooth to generate the normal levels of traction. You get traction from the mechanical friction the tire generates with the road. If it's smooth/cold/greasy you have less traction. So, you need to heat the tire so that the rubber can wear well, you need to generate some friction to wear the smooth stuff and you don't want to generate so much heat so that the oils that are in the rubber don't make their way to the surface and ruin the party (think track day tire look).

You'll find most manufacturers say in their literature that you need about 100 miles to achieve the right level of "scrubbing". After I figured out that new tires are ready to go race pace (OK, at my race pace ;)) after one lap, I tested this on my street bike. My tires are ready for normal riding after a quite ride up curvy local road from my house (total of 10 miles) of progressively leaning it in to the nice curves. I've done this in the rain too, BTW, no problems.

I suspect that if you are a smooth rider and keep in mind that you can't do any emergency maneuvers in the first 10 miles, no special loop is needed. Just ride the bike smoothly and let it lean in to the turns without pushing too hard. If you don't have a nice set of twisties near by to help with the scrubbing, just zigzag in your lane (start with small angles first, heat up the tires and start slowly increasing the countersteering force so that the angle gets steeper) after the few miles to heat the tires up should also do the trick.


Gustavo

Yep pretty much what I said/do...
 

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I agree with Gustavo that new tires are ready very quickly and there is no such thing anymore as mold release. However, I do believe some of the manufactures put a "preservative" on tires that takes a short period of time to wear off. I have seen folks at pace on the track by the second lap with new tires.
 

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My previous bike shop would rub new tyres down with disc brake cleaner fluid as they were being balanced. This removed the shiny look and left a dull surface that looked like it had already been ridden. They needed nothing further.

The mechanic's point of view was that he didn't want his customers to lose the bike at a roundabout before they got home.

I've moved to another city since then and I don't know what the local bloke will do when I need to replace tyres on the V.
 
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