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:feedback:I have been reading several threads on tires. My question is do the tires that come with the versys are they really that bad? Do they wear out that quickly or is it just that people don't like them and perfer to put on something else? If they are bad,what are people doing?
 

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My opinion, they are not that bad, oem dunlops rear wore out on me in 8000km, replaced with pirelli strada which also wore out in 8000km 300+ km on the strada was used on track pushing very hard, currently just under a 1000km on pirelli angels on rear.

Did not have any real problems on the dunlops and was more disapointed on the strada's as they slipped on me at end and wore funny.
 

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They aren't that bad, people really just prefer something else.

Some people want a tire that is really sticky and soft, some people want a tire that is going to last a long time, some people want a tire with an aggressive tread, and some people want a tire that is really low cost. This tire is kinda in the middle on all accounts, and in trying to satisfy everyone, it ends up satisfying no one.

It's a great starter tire, after you use it up you'll figure out what you want out of a tire and buy accordingly. Or if it turns out you like it, you'll buy it again.
 

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Stockers are fine in most cases. No bike manufacturer can afford to choose poorly and stay in business. They select the tire they feel will provide reasonable levels of safety, comfort and tread life.

Ride them, assess them, change later if you want. Keep in mind, others ride in a different environment than you, or in a different manner or style than you do.

Lots of good choices out there. Hard to goof up.

It's a really personal thing.

V-Zee
 

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dulops ok in the dry no trust in the wet
I love my RoadSmarts by Dunlop in the rain, and all other conditions for that matter.
 

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Got 12K km from the oem tires. Not that bad for me. The Roadsmarts provide much better handling overall. Have not try the roadsmarts in wet weather yet.
 

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My bike came with the Roadsmarts. The front had a short lifespan and the rear was twitchy. I have some Michelin PR2s in the shop ready to be mounted.
 

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Kawasaki contracts with Dunlop for a universal tire to put on the bikes as they assemble them. You can't actually buy that exact tire as an aftermarket, however Dunlop offers the ROADSMART sport touring radial and it gets very good reports from those that want a general use tire.

The problem with the stocker is that it tends to get squared off pretty fast if you do much super-slab. Some of the more advanced tires out there have a multi-compound construction where they put harder rubber in the center and softer on the shoulders for corning. They get high marks from performance riders that have to do a lot of slab work.

Canyon carvers want more of a sportbike tire - they are softer, stickier, and have a more pronounced profile to provide a bigger patch leaned way over.

Riders that experience wet pavement will choose something targeted at that medium. Some are better than others.

Touring and adventure type riders that will see some off-pavement want something with a better grip on dirt, even going as far as a dual-sport knobby type tire.

It's best to stick to the standard size tire as that's what fits on the rims best and will provide the best handling on-road.

Each brand has tread styles that target specific uses, and mostly they are all pretty good tires or they get a bad reputation and people won't buy them.

And yes, price wise they are all over the board, but generally it's about $250-$300 for new tires. Some may be a little less and some a little more. Most riders want 4-6K miles out of their tires, some want more, some will live with less for specialized applications.

The neat thing about the Versys is that it gets used with many different riding styles and terrains and there are tires to help you do your favorite better.
 

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They aren't that bad, people really just prefer something else.

Some people want a tire that is really sticky and soft, some people want a tire that is going to last a long time
I replaced the stock tires after they wore out with tires that stick better, have better feel and feedback, and last longer. The stock tires aren't horrible or a safety risk, but tire technology has moved on, and it's easy to find a sport touring tire that outperforms the 221s in almost every way.
 

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Kawasaki contracts with Dunlop for a universal tire to put on the bikes as they assemble them. You can't actually buy that exact tire as an aftermarket
Sure you can. Off the Kawasaki website:

Pt # 41009-0128, Dunlop D221FA (front)
Pt # 41009-0129, Dunlop D221G (rear)
 

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Sure you can. Off the Kawasaki website:

Pt # 41009-0128, Dunlop D221FA (front)
Pt # 41009-0129, Dunlop D221G (rear)
Hey, I hadn't thought of that, you're right! I wonder if the parts depots even carry them.

But why would one want to pay $375 for a set of crappy oem tires when you could get much better tires for about $100 less?
 
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Garbage! - shouldn't be on a novice type bike IMO. Passable in warm/dry climates, although could still lock the front in a straight line and on standard brakes. - crap elsewhere/In the wet, I lost all confidence after endless tucks, just riding sensibly, and junked at earliest opportunity.
 

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Hey, I hadn't thought of that, you're right! I wonder if the parts depots even carry them.

But why would one want to pay $375 for a set of crappy oem tires when you could get much better tires for about $100 less?
I don't know why one would do that either....I purchased Michelin's myself!
 

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The D221s are definitely outdated technology, so that's why everyone switches to something else. Or newer Dunlops. Personally, I don't think the D221s are awful, just less than optimal.

Tires are definitely a matter of personal opinion.
 

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As others have said the Bike leaves Kawasaki with Dunlop D221's, however if you are buying new most dealers (well several in the UK) have been willing to change the tyres to whatever you prefer for somewhere in the region of £50..100, depending on your negotiating skill
 
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