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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see these discussions, but everyone has their own definition of ATGATT.

I personally wear different levels of ATGATT, depending on circumstances, while others wear full armored leathers, race gloves, tall armored boots, air bag vest, and FF helmet of the highest rating every time they ride.

My minimal ATGATT consists of modular helmet, armored mesh jacket, mesh gloves with leather palms, Kevlar jeans without armor, and over the ankle motorcycle boots.

My minimal Adventure ATGATT consists of the above, but better gloves, and rugged 12" adventure boots with ankle and shin armor.

My max ATGATT is either full race leathers, or one piece Cordura suit with all the armor including hip armor.

What do you consider your minimum ATGATT?
 

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It means sitting at a nice dinner with my girlfriend's parents with sweaty knees and hips from pads underneath Covec-reinforced jeans that I haven't washed since I bought them.💁‍♂️

I always wear gloves, a padded jacket, and reinforced jeans with at minimum knee pads. If it rains, a hi-vis (though not padded) snowmobiling jacket and waterproof overpants. For city riding I wear high-top sneakers (that at minimum shouldn't fly off if I go flying) unless I expect to be pushing the bike on twisties, when I'll wear big Alpine boots.

There's a Youtuber named Squid Tips that does a great breakdown/counterargument to the ATGATT mentality that I enjoyed watching, despite being someone who can't justify not wearing moderate protection despite the inconvenience. I personally don't see the point in shaming squiddy riders for not wearing gear, it's just a personal choice, albiet one that often directly corellates to one's awareness of their own mortality.
 

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Minimum - helmet, back protector + gloves.

Maximum - helmet + back protector + jacket + jeans + gloves + boots

Only missing in my equipmet are moto boots, I use now 6 inch Timberland waterproof boots (tested on 250km in rain, 100% dry foot).
It is hard to find size US14 motorbike boots here(I wish first to test are they fit to me, I don't wish to order 200$ boots without trying - but i will need to risk)
 

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I can't say that, as a rule, I'm ATGATT. I'm MTGMTT. With that in mind, in general, I wear (as seen in my avatar):
  • Full-face helmet
  • Jacket with shoulder and elbow armor and at least back padding
  • Gloves
  • Motorcycle-specific boots
For rides that are more than my commute, like a day trip or longer on the road, I am ATGATT:
  • Full-face helmet
  • Jacket with shoulder and elbow armor and at least back padding
  • Gloves
  • Riding pants
  • Motorcycle-specific boots
 

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Commuting
Head: Full-face helmet plus extra clear or tinted visor in the tank bag​
Hands: Either my regular Alpine Stars gloves or my waterproof Revit gloves in colder weather​
Upper Body: Motorcycle specific jacket with abrasion and impact protection on joints and back. Most times an all-season shell, or an Olympia mesh jacket in hot weather.​
Legs: Regular trousers​
Feet: Doc Martin lace-up boots (basically work boots)​


Rides
As above with the following change​
Legs: Motorcycle pants with knee and hip padding and abrasion protection.​
Notes
I unfortunately have some first-hand experience with crashing and sliding. What I have learned is pressure points (your joints) ARE the location of abrasion injuries. That is elbows, shoulders, knees, etc.. For that reason, your main source of abrasion protection is from the pads in your jacket or pants. I personally would not feel safe in a jacket without pads or where the pads easily shifted off the joints. I also think palm sliders on gloves are highly underrated. Your lower palms often strike first and if your hand then grips the road the force of the twist at speed can break your wrist, at least it did mine. High-quality gloves put plastic on the base of the palm or perhaps super fabric.​
 

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Minimum - Normal boots, jeans, full face helmet, armored textile or very heavy motorcycle specific leather jacket, real motorcycle gloves, backpack.

Maximum - Add kevlar lined jeans with pads removed can't stand the pads in the pants and firstgear boots.

If raining add firstgear thermo suit.

Quality Leather>Textile, pads or not. IMO.
 

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This triggered me to watch a bunch of crash videos one in particular a guy goes down at 90mph onto pavement tumbling with his z650 in a t-shirt and khakis his shoulder got hellacious road rash but everything else was fine his khakis had a small hole. He immediately stood up and picked his bike up injured but not really seriously... He walked to a nearby clinic and they turned him away and sent him to the hospital, they obviously didn't think it was that serious either.

Of course I believe in wearing riding gear but I think alot of people just like to buy expensive stuff and judge others for being underprotected. When really they just believe they need all this expensive gear because of good marketing from gear vendors. It's almost an artificial beliefe system that has been created "I think this jacket will protect me because ce pads" "I think back protector is required" "I won't ride without my $1400 aerostitch suit".

I think wear the gear that makes you comfortable, but I also think I've seen a hundred videos of pretty serious crashes where people were wearing normal jeans and walked away unscathed.

I have personally seen a guy go down at 80mph low side tumble on an old katana in jeans and a joe rocket CE jacket his flesh all over was untouched the jacket didn't even tear, minor abrasions, but he broke his collarbone in 7 places on the gas tank. That was a 400 dollar jacket didn't save his collar bone maybe we need built in collar bone protectors now? Not really, just making a point.

I also have a friend from high school who was sleeping in the passenger seat of a car with his seat belt on when the driver fell asleep at the wheel they went off the road and hit an embankment, the driver went through the windshield and was thrown from the car she broke her arm and was at school 2 days later. My friend in the seatbelt never walked again.

20 years ago I watched another friend go down passing me at 150mph on his bike I had the rev limiter in my old 924 from highschool pegged. He was wearing a t-shirt and shorts low sided and slid across the road on his back, the firemen that arrived with the paramedics said spinal fluid was on the road. He was fine overall it was nasty scars but we were drinking beers laughing a few weeks later.

Just my opinion I believe it's about 80 percent luck and 20 percent gear. The 20 percent I won't risk are my ankles, torso, hands, and head. So helmet, jacket, gloves, boots every time.
 

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My maximum is my minimum, just vented for summer. I don't wear any less for a different circumstance or because it is hot.
Helmet, ear plugs, neck gaitor, armored jacket, gloves, armored pants and full height boots and occasionally a kidney belt/lumbar support.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just my opinion I believe it's about 80 percent luck and 20 percent gear. The 20 percent I won't risk are my ankles, torso, hands, and head. So helmet, jacket, gloves, boots every time.
Not riding like an idiot goes a long way towards not crashing at all. :sneaky: ;)

There is another term I hear "You are pressing your luck".

When my Sister and Brother in Law were hit head on by a drug addled driver who crossed into their lane, no amount of gear would have prevented their injuries.
 

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Occasionally my rides are in traffic when I am going to to doing quotes etc for my job (as too expensive to take my truck), however most of my rides are long distance weekend rides, mountain terrain. Curvy unpredictable terrain, even though I may have ridden the route before.
I am always fully booted, minimum kevlar jeans with pads, kevlar jacket and pads, obvious gloves & helmet (I also wear 'go Kart' rib protectors as an ex go kart racer).
I have had several accidents that were not my fault, and several that were poor terrain & judgement on my part. A few trips in ambulance, a collision due to other driver falling asleep and veering into my lane which almost ended for the worst. If it were not for my alertness training and protective gear I would not be around anymore so my advise to everybody is gear up!! Be safe. Be alert & ride to the conditions and your capabilities and definitely do not compromise on your protection!!
 

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Well, there was this time back in '92...

I was living in a small town out west (the population was about 2500+), it was Saturday afternoon, and I had to drop into work and then see a friend on the other side of town (round trip about 7km, ok then 4.375 miles). It was winter, but a warm sunny day, so I put on my canvas ex-army jacket over shorts & a t-shirt and running shoes. I forgot my gloves, but not the full-face helmet.
I was nearly home... and there was this dumb dog that would run out and bark. Every time. An easy slow, swerve and pull away. Every time. But this time, this time there was another dog a couple of houses up. It was running flat out across the road to get me. And down we go!
There I was, sitting on the road, looking at my bike, which had slid up the road maybe 5 or 10 metres, and a dead dog 5 metres in the other direction. I was sitting there wondering what had happened - no pain, just confusion. I soon realised that I had crashed and that crashing can lead to injury, so I started to do an assessment. Left foot, lower leg, knee, upper leg and hip all good. Left hand has a big scrape at the heel. Left arm, shoulder & collar bone all good. Ribs fine, breathing ok. Head turned fine. Vision clear, hearing seemed ok. And the same down the other side - scrape on elbow, large scrape in heel of hand, hole on the inside of my knee (all skin was gone, able see the good stuff inside, but no blood) and down to my lower leg. Oh, it moves. It moves independently of my foot. FFFFFAAAARRRKKKKKK!
Anyway, while high as on the magic lolli, I got to watch the ambo run up the ramp at the hospital and say to the nurse in charge, "...male, late 20's, suspected broken tibia & fibula... and it's your husband".

I now wear the good gear everywhere! Especially boots (Sidi Adventure), knee guards (proper strap on double hinge MX ones) and gloves (with lots of leather and a hard plastic heel slider).

While the gear might be uncomfortable in the heat or walking around, it's nothing compared to what could happen.

NOTE: It's very hard to use crutches (and wipe your @r$e) when you have your hands bandaged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, there was this time back in '92...

I was living in a small town out west (the population was about 2500+), it was Saturday afternoon, and I had to drop into work and then see a friend on the other side of town (round trip about 7km, ok then 4.375 miles). It was winter, but a warm sunny day, so I put on my canvas ex-army jacket over shorts & a t-shirt and running shoes. I forgot my gloves, but not the full-face helmet.
I was nearly home... and there was this dumb dog that would run out and bark. Every time. An easy slow, swerve and pull away. Every time. But this time, this time there was another dog a couple of houses up. It was running flat out across the road to get me. And down we go!
There I was, sitting on the road, looking at my bike, which had slid up the road maybe 5 or 10 metres, and a dead dog 5 metres in the other direction. I was sitting there wondering what had happened - no pain, just confusion. I soon realised that I had crashed and that crashing can lead to injury, so I started to do an assessment. Left foot, lower leg, knee, upper leg and hip all good. Left hand has a big scrape at the heel. Left arm, shoulder & collar bone all good. Ribs fine, breathing ok. Head turned fine. Vision clear, hearing seemed ok. And the same down the other side - scrape on elbow, large scrape in heel of hand, hole on the inside of my knee (all skin was gone, able see the good stuff inside, but no blood) and down to my lower leg. Oh, it moves. It moves independently of my foot. FFFFFAAAARRRKKKKKK!
Anyway, while high as on the magic lolli, I got to watch the ambo run up the ramp at the hospital and say to the nurse in charge, "...male, late 20's, suspected broken tibia & fibula... and it's your husband".

I now wear the good gear everywhere! Especially boots (Sidi Adventure), knee guards (proper strap on double hinge MX ones) and gloves (with lots of leather and a hard plastic heel slider).

While the gear might be uncomfortable in the heat or walking around, it's nothing compared to what could happen.

NOTE: It's very hard to use crutches (and wipe your @r$e) when you have your hands bandaged.
Dogs are a PITA. Most other animals you might encounter on the road you can come to a stop and assess the situation. If you come to a stop around the dogs they may take a chunk out of your leg. But now after reading your experience I am going to risk coming to a stop. Better to have my gear in their teeth than go down. Thanks for sharing and hope you have no lasting issues from that experience. I know when the weather is changing from previous injuries.
 

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I was riding around exploring back roads up on the Chehalis river one day Oh look, here's a paved road in the middle of nowhere. Wonder if it gets down to the river. As I go I see the no-go sign, I'm on a First Nations access road and riding into their settlement. But I carried on.
Full on crazy reservation dogs every second house that like running after cars and going mental. No people to be seen, they're probably watching from inside and laughing at the dumb trespasser on a Versys. I've been bitten riding my bicycle before. No slowing down and the road dead ended of course. So back through the gauntlet I went. They were all ready for my return and saved their best for the rubber match!
 

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When my wife and I were in Thailand, we rented a small Honda to 'look-around' on. A dog ran out, barking, then bit my wife on the leg while I was trying to ride away from it. Thankfully - not too serious!
 

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Dogs are a PITA. Most other animals you might encounter on the road you can come to a stop and assess the situation. If you come to a stop around the dogs they may take a chunk out of your leg. But now after reading your experience I am going to risk coming to a stop. Better to have my gear in their teeth than go down. Thanks for sharing and hope you have no lasting issues from that experience. I know when the weather is changing from previous injuries.
Cheers TWA
I recall having the same thoughts about stopping - it was a "pig dog" in full flight (pig hunting with those short stocky dogs was a big thing out there) so I took a chance and lost.
Well, I can't tell if the weather is going to change...
 
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