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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve got a 2016 v650 with oxford heated grips and an oem lighter plug I use to charge an iPhone. On a recent 280 mile trip I found after each stop my starter was sounding weaker and weaker. By the time I got home, barely enough juice to start. I put it back in the Optimate and it passed all the tests. I hooked up a multimeter and I get normal readings (12.4 at battery terms when stopped, 13.4 at idle, won’t go over 14.2 when revving.) Is it possible that these two accessories are drawing down faster than the system can recharge? I hope not because I was hoping to add some auxiliary lights as well!
 

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10AMP HR Battery

I’ve got a 2016 v650 with oxford heated grips and an oem lighter plug I use to charge an iPhone. On a recent 280 mile trip I found after each stop my starter was sounding weaker and weaker. By the time I got home, barely enough juice to start. I put it back in the Optimate and it passed all the tests. I hooked up a multimeter and I get normal readings (12.4 at battery terms when stopped, 13.4 at idle, won’t go over 14.2 when revving.) Is it possible that these two accessories are drawing down faster than the system can recharge? I hope not because I was hoping to add some auxiliary lights as well!
I would suggest getting your battery load tested once fully charged, you don't mention how many starts, the sustained RPM ( I assume most of your riding would be at or above 4000 RPM ) . Are you riding with the high beam on? Any additional lighting? Idle RPM should be 1350 to 1400 RPM, ( load testing is a must by a battery load tester), use a good digital voltmeter after you get confirmation that your battery is OK. At 1350 to 1400 RPM voltage should be 14 to 14.5 volts ( after warm up , off fast idle), if it isn't, try raising idle by 50 RPM, note change if any, report back here.

You may have charging problems, before I go there I want to hear back from you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Update and apologies for some incorrect figures. After 24 hours on the optimate the battery is fully recharged and reads 12.8v with engine off. 14.2 at idle and at 300” it’s around 14.8. The bike starts but it’s definitely doing the slow and hesitant crank that I usually associate with a dying battery. The is a 2016 bike with 6000 miles so I would be unhappy if the battery was dead at this point, but I may take it to my dealer and see what they can do under warranty. If I do get a new battery, I’ve heard that there are some really good lithium ion batteries out there that perform well and weigh less. Anyone using these and have feedback?
 

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lithium batteries

Update and apologies for some incorrect figures. After 24 hours on the optimate the battery is fully recharged and reads 12.8v with engine off. 14.2 at idle and at 300” it’s around 14.8. The bike starts but it’s definitely doing the slow and hesitant crank that I usually associate with a dying battery. The is a 2016 bike with 6000 miles so I would be unhappy if the battery was dead at this point, but I may take it to my dealer and see what they can do under warranty. If I do get a new battery, I’ve heard that there are some really good lithium ion batteries out there that perform well and weigh less. Anyone using these and have feedback?
See my post #11 --As to batteries, I use the original Yuasa AGM battery, usually get 5 to 6 years out it. Weight isn't a concern, if it was I wouldn't have the Trekker cases and Givi Top box.>:)
https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/170-technical-discussion-v-650/117074-lithium-ion-batteries.html?highlight=amp+hour+lithium
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I’m starting a new thread as a follow on to this one from last week

https://www.kawasakiversys.com/#/topics/217037

After replacing my battery with a new one, my problem remains. When I crank the starter, it cranks very slowly, just like it would if the battery was running down. It will generally start but it isn’t confidence inspiring. My old Ducati ST2 had this problem and there was a well known problem underspec’d wiring, as explained in this quote

“Condition: Bike is difficult to start, starts slow or not at all, sometimes fouls plugs. Takes multiple attempts to get it started. Rider has low confidence of bike starting.

The Cause: Underspec wire size plus brass or steel terminals throughout the starter circuit have created chokepoints to the current flow. Starter motor receives less current than it requires which necessitates long cranking times. The excess cranking depletes battery voltage below that required by the ignition system to start the bike. Multiple cranking events eventually allow the chemical reaction in the battery to create enough current to start the bike but battery is damaged by long discharge cycles.

The Bandaid Install new or larger battery - bike starts well until excess resistance in starter circuit degrades new battery.

The Solution Install a HICAP high current starter circuit that has the least possible resistance to current flow
* HICAP - outboards and replaces the OEM starting circuit that is riddled with chokepoints that impede current flow.
* * Pays for itself in reduced battery consumption and reduced starting system wear.”

Does anyone think I could have a similar issue? If so, what would be the procedure to test this?
 

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High Jacked Thread

I’m starting a new thread as a follow on to this one from last week

https://www.kawasakiversys.com/#/topics/217037

After replacing my battery with a new one, my problem remains. When I crank the starter, it cranks very slowly, just like it would if the battery was running down. It will generally start but it isn’t confidence inspiring. My old Ducati ST2 had this problem and there was a well known problem underspec’d wiring, as explained in this quote

“Condition: Bike is difficult to start, starts slow or not at all, sometimes fouls plugs. Takes multiple attempts to get it started. Rider has low confidence of bike starting.

The Cause: Underspec wire size plus brass or steel terminals throughout the starter circuit have created chokepoints to the current flow. Starter motor receives less current than it requires which necessitates long cranking times. The excess cranking depletes battery voltage below that required by the ignition system to start the bike. Multiple cranking events eventually allow the chemical reaction in the battery to create enough current to start the bike but battery is damaged by long discharge cycles.

The Bandaid Install new or larger battery - bike starts well until excess resistance in starter circuit degrades new battery.

The Solution Install a HICAP high current starter circuit that has the least possible resistance to current flow
* HICAP - outboards and replaces the OEM starting circuit that is riddled with chokepoints that impede current flow.
* * Pays for itself in reduced battery consumption and reduced starting system wear.”

Does anyone think I could have a similar issue? If so, what would be the procedure to test this?
I have copied some of your original posts from the other thread, I realize the thread was derailed so lets try again. You have a new battery, please state what you have, is it the AGM Yuasa ?

So the next step is fun, one of two things, I very much doubt it is the starter, first place I would put my money is the engine ground, extremely difficult to get at on the MK-3, ABS is in the way, so is the frame, believe it or not, the easiest access is doing a valve shim check with the throttle bodies removed ( don't think you want to do that. Access is from the clutch actuator side of the bike, with the plastic removed.

You really need to remove the bolt and clean away any oxide, as the starter uses the aluminum casting for the negative power, on my 07 I found heavy aluminum oxide under this connection, which happens to be the negative wire from the battery to engine aluminum ground connection.

Another simple test would be to connect a voltmeter across the starter solenoid , it will read battery voltage with the meter across the solenoid contacts, observe the voltage while the starter is engaged, it should read around 0.2 to 0.5 VDC, if you read above 1 volt your relay ( solenoid) is shot. This last test would be the simplest. Also I mentioned previously about checking engine grounds and frame grounds, on the MK-3 they are numerous, I recall something like 9 frame grounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey that’s really good info! I pulled off the plastic til I got to the solenoid. Unplugged, steel worked and reattached all the contacts. Tried to run your test but I can’t see the voltmeter reading when trying to start because it starts up so fast I can’t register it. I think I had a loosening connection.
 
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