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My V is my first bike so I'm brand new to anything motorcycle related. I know that during the breakin period I was told to let the bike warm up completely before I took off. I would usually wait until it changed from the fast to slow idle, then I would take off.

Now that my break in period is done, how long do you usually wait for the bike to be warmed up? Do I need to wait for the fast idle to slow? Or if I start it up and then just put on my helmet and gloves and then hop on, is that enough time? I'm sure it probably differs when it's been sitting cold all night as opposed to sitting off for an hour during lunch, right?

So how long do you guys wait, if at all?
 

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My V is my first bike so I'm brand new to anything motorcycle related. I know that during the breakin period I was told to let the bike warm up completely before I took off. I would usually wait until it changed from the fast to slow idle, then I would take off.

Now that my break in period is done, how long do you usually wait for the bike to be warmed up? Do I need to wait for the fast idle to slow? Or if I start it up and then just put on my helmet and gloves and then hop on, is that enough time? I'm sure it probably differs when it's been sitting cold all night as opposed to sitting off for an hour during lunch, right?

So how long do you guys wait, if at all?
I let it warm up everytime, just seems like a good precaution.
 

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It's good to wait until idle drops to normal 1300 rpm before slamming it in gear. How long it takes depends on initial engine temperature, which is subject to ambient temperature... I did reduce fast idle rpm by rotating subthrottle sensor to its maximum counterclockwise position (it was already close), after fast idle rpm was raised by adjusting main throttle sensor output voltage up to to spec by rotating it about 0.5 mm counterclockwise.
 

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Usually start up then put helmet gloves on and don't take off until she comes off fast idle back to about 1300 rpm, mine when it drops back seem to drop well under the 1300 for a sec, almost think its going to stall then it idles normal
 

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My V is my first bike so I'm brand new to anything motorcycle related. I know that during the breakin period I was told to let the bike warm up completely before I took off.
Bad advice. I don't know where you got it, but it's an old wives tale. Maybe you misinterpreted what was said? Actually, considering that during break-in you are not supposed to be revving it much anyway, I can't see the point at all.

There is no need to wait for anything once the bike is started. It has an automatic idle speed adjustment, all you have to do is be mindful that when you close the throttle the bike is idling somewhere around 3K RPM so it wont slow down as much as it would under normal idle, so you have to remember to pull the clutch early to stop. The best way to warm up the bike is by allowing the engine to slowly come up to temperature. That happens much better if the bike is actually running and rolling, with good cooling, which you do not get while idling in place. No to mention that it wastes gas and produces needless emissions.

What I was thinking the advice could have been is not to rev the bike hard before it's warmed up, but as I mentioned above, since you probably were also advised not to rev past 4K RPM, it makes little sense. The reason you want to wait until the bike has warmed up to get into the higher rev range is that you want the oil to be up to temp and circulating well before you start stressing the engine.


Gustavo
 

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Every vehicle I have had, have always warmed up including my turbo diesel truck
That used to be the old conventional wisdom. I was told the same when I was a young man learning to drive/ride. Back then it was more an issue of carburation and the engine's ability to run when cold. With FI that is no longer the case and warm up is no longer needed or even desirable.

Gustavo
 

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I understand what your saying Gustavo but its hard to break a habit, my turbo diesel does need a short warm up and the bike I do not like to take when its cold and still reving higher as my driveway is 650 m of mostly gravel and going downhill, was in a hurry one day and it took off on me for a second, stood up and pretended was on my old DR 500
 

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Start bike, don gear (takes about a minute or 2), ride off but don't over-stress the engine in the first 5 minutes. It's fine to ride off before the bike is fully warm, as the actual riding will warm it up. But don't beat on the bike until fully warm (5 mins or so of riding).

In the old days warming up was necessary because the carbs needed it to operate properly. FI forgoes that need now before riding off.
 

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Bad advice. I don't know where you got it, but it's an old wives tale. Maybe you misinterpreted what was said?
Gustavo
Uh, 'don't know where you got it'??? How about the Owners Manual - page 46, Break-In, in my UK manual states, 'Do not start moving or race the engine immediately after starting it even if the engine is already warm. Run the engine for two or three minutes at idle speed to give the oil a chance to work up into all the engine parts'.

Still, perhaps you know better than the manufacturers...
 

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Engine components grow (expand) as they come up to temperature and as they do so the various clearances (Ring, Bearing, Valve, etc.) can change. I give it a couple of minutes for that to happen — and for the oil (even multi-weight) a minute or 2 longer if it has been sitting in winter temps.

It seems to me that the V drops out of fast-idle at a good time to start moving and then I’ll give it another minute or 2 before I get on it really hard.

PS,
For those of you who subscribe to MotoMan’s Engine Break-in Techniques (I do for the most part) note how often and emphatically he says to, “warm the engine up completely.”

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MotoMan’s Engine Break-in Techniques (I do for the most part) note how often and emphatically he says to, “warm the engine up completely.”

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That's because he expects the rider to stress the engine as soon as he/she gets moving, not take it easy the first 5 minutes.

When I ride the V, I start the bike, then put my helmet and gloves on, roll out of the garage and close the door. By then it's been running for 1-2 minutes already. Then I ride, making sure I take it easy for a few minutes; no hard acceleration, keep the revs low but not lugging it.
 

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My memory is pretty bad but I thought the owners manual said something like at least 2 minutes. Like most here have said, after helmet, gloves and closing the garage I ride off.
 

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Uh, 'don't know where you got it'??? How about the Owners Manual - page 46, Break-In, in my UK manual states, 'Do not start moving or race the engine immediately after starting it even if the engine is already warm. Run the engine for two or three minutes at idle speed to give the oil a chance to work up into all the engine parts'.
I just checked, very true that's what it says (it's never too late to start reading the manual, even after three years... :D). It also says that break-in should be done by limiting the load on the engine in the first 1000 miles, that it takes 100 miles to break in new tires and that you should shift from 5th to 6th at 34 MPH.

My take is that most of this is advice is aimed at new riders who don't know any better, you give them generic recommendations that won't get them in trouble and you avoid being liable for any mishaps they have. The reality is that if it took the oil 2-3 minutes to work it's way to all the engine parts your engine wouldn't last 10K miles because the wear each time you started it would be huge. The important part of their advice (which I read above in several posts) is not to race the engine when it's cold, but again, it's not warm enough to run it to red-line after 3 minutes of idling if you started with a cold engine (say first ride of the day).

Like everything else, you can take my advice/opinion (or other people's) on this with grain of salt. Do your own research and educate yourself on the subject. Read what different car/motorcycle sites say on this subject and decide what's the best course of action for your bikes.


Gustavo
 

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Speaking of warm up, since your new to street riding, remember to warm up your tires before getting to agressive in the corners. Really important in colder weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I just checked, very true that's what it says (it's never too late to start reading the manual, even after three years... :D). It also says that break-in should be done by limiting the load on the engine in the first 1000 miles, that it takes 100 miles to break in new tires and that you should shift from 5th to 6th at 34 MPH.

My take is that most of this is advice is aimed at new riders who don't know any better, you give them generic recommendations that won't get them in trouble and you avoid being liable for any mishaps they have. The reality is that if it took the oil 2-3 minutes to work it's way to all the engine parts your engine wouldn't last 10K miles because the wear each time you started it would be huge. The important part of their advice (which I read above in several posts) is not to race the engine when it's cold, but again, it's not warm enough to run it to red-line after 3 minutes of idling if you started with a cold engine (say first ride of the day).

Like everything else, you can take my advice/opinion (or other people's) on this with grain of salt. Do your own research and educate yourself on the subject. Read what different car/motorcycle sites say on this subject and decide what's the best course of action for your bikes.

Gustavo
That's exactly where I heard it, but I agree, the manual does seem to be very conservative in its directions. I don't know how I could drive the V in 6th gear going 35mph...that just doesn't seem right (nor fun) to me!

I'm on the short warm-up wagon. Start the bike, finish gearing up, roll off and take it easy for the first few miles.
This is what I have been doing since it passed the magic 1k mark. Seems to me that this (and the similar suggestions here) is the easiest most practical method to use.

Speaking of warm up, since your new to street riding, remember to warm up your tires before getting to agressive in the corners. Really important in colder weather.
Good advice. I've heard this before, but one thing I haven't heard is what is the point where you'd consider the tires warmed up? My commute to work in the mornings is only 10-15 minutes of side streets with a couple miles of freeway. Is this enough time? The freeway on ramps here are the righthand sweeping turn type which lend themselves to fun, but they are always within 5 minutes of me starting up the bike and leaving so I haven't really been "enjoying" them as much as I'd like to.
 

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Best way to warm up the engine is by riding it. You need the air passing through the motor to warm up all parts of the engine. Your fan probably won't be on.
 
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