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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To minimize or move engine vibrations to a different rpm range, try this:
Put a Jack under the engine.
Loosen up the engine mounts (4 bolts).
Use the Jack to move the engine up, down, back or front. (The radial play in the engine mounts are just a few tenth of a mm.)
Lubricate the nuts, and re torque to 44Nm rear and 44Nm front.

When I got the idea to try this I started by moving the engine in the highest
position. I noticed reduced vibrations below 4000 rpm and increased above.
I then tried the lowest position and got the best result, a minor increase below 3500 rpm compared to the highest position but smoothest overall.

With lubrication of the nuts there is a greater clamping force, so the torque value is not wasted by friction at the nuts.

I also made small adjustments to the handlebar by moving it sideways to the right 1mm, and moving the clutch and brake lever holders from being tight to the switch controls to approx. 5mm space.

I now have a much smoother bike, with a clear left mirror at legal speeds

The vibrations will also change:
When the heat from the engine is transferred to the frame.
When fuel is consumed from full to empty.
Rider weight.
Passenger weight.
Baggage weight and/or location.
And so on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks!

Yes, I might have a sensitive butt...and hands...and feet.
If you reposition the engine (and/or) other parts, you will notice you are sensitive too.
And by the way, get rid of the axial play (if any) by shimming, before tightening the bolts.

Here´s more "food"
If a bike is taken apart and than put back together again, it will have a change in "personality".
Most racers have a favorite car/bike out of a teams "identically" cars/bikes, why?
With fewer parts there will be less difference, but never the same.
With smaller tolerances there will also be less difference, but again never the same.
 

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Hi svanne

There's certainly merit to the type of procedure you describe.

When I sold Suzuki's, service bulletins were often released for models with vibration issues. Typically they concentrated on torques and tightening sequences on the engine and muffler mounts. I recall the GS1150 particularly benefiting from this procedure.

The devil is in the details
 

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If a bike is taken apart and than put back together again, it will have a change in "personality".
This has also been my experience, it always seems like the bike is "tighter" after rebuilding. I can't explain it exactly, but after working on a bike and getting to know it you begin to pick up the nuances of the bike and notice the subtle changes. I find it fascinating that we are so "sensitive" to these sutble changes.

I have also found that after I have spent time working on a bike that I begin to trust it more and begin the process of ongoing tweaking as a part of the maintenance and enjoyment of the bike.

I have been able to pass some of this down to my grandchildren. There is nothing more magical than to see a young pups eyes light up after working on a motor for a couple of days, reinstalling it and getting it started again... it is a wonderful bonding moment and brings me instantly back to my own childhood, working on bikes and snowmobiles in my father's shop.

Thanks Svannie for bringing back those wonderful thoughts, It has made my day!

Cheers,
 
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