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Discussion Starter #1
Fellow members,
I am new to motorcycling and to my Versys (which I bought sight unseen from a dealer). It is a 2013 and had approximately 8000 mile upon me purchasing it. I have put a little more than 1000 miles on it an it seems to run just fine. The dealer claims that they did an oil change but that was about it. I tried to track down the previous owner for any records but no luck. In the next month I will be taking it in for the first time to a "motorcycle mechanic" to have some new tires put on and a back sprocket.

Do you forum members have any advice as to anything that I might want to get checked or inspected for peace of mind considering the unknown past. Valves?

I plan on an DIY oil change and if any signs of fishiness appear then that would change the check up.

Thanks in advance. I love this place. I could waste my whole workday here.
 

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1. replace both sprockets and chain in a 'set',
2. always tip your mechanic: he will ALWAYS remember you.
 

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I have read on this forum about replacing the 44t with a 46t. Sounds like a modification I would like and enjoy.
Gotcha. My personal opinion would be to ride the bike for a while first, then make the gearing change.

A) Larger rear sprocket will make the bike quicker; as a new rider on a new bike, I'm not sure why you would want that.

B) If you make this change later on -like after a year of riding it- you will really notice the difference and appreciate it much more.

C) Why spend the money if you don't have to?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Gotcha. My personal opinion would be to ride the bike for a while first, then make the gearing change.

A) Larger rear sprocket will make the bike quicker; as a new rider on a new bike, I'm not sure why you would want that.

B) If you make this change later on -like after a year of riding it- you will really notice the difference and appreciate it much more.

C) Why spend the money if you don't have to?
Thanks. I have put about 1200 -1400 miles on the bike myself. I think that I would like a "longer" gear to get through intersections in first (without feeling I have to shift to second in the intersection) and to lower the RPMs a bit for interstate riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
1. replace both sprockets and chain in a 'set',
2. always tip your mechanic: he will ALWAYS remember you.
In regards to buying and replacing sprockets & chain as a set, is that so that the wear would be more "even" throughout the components of the drive train and would all be replaced at the same time in the future?
 

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I think you have that backwards. Stock tooth count on the
rear is 46. Many replace with 44 to give taller gears (lower rpms in any given gear), which is what you said you want. A bigger than stock rear sprocket produces higher rpms in any given gear, or shorter gearing.

And agree it's best to change both sprockets and the chain as a set. They all break in together. Replacement of one of the components can cause the new component to wear quicker.
 

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In regards to buying and replacing sprockets & chain as a set, is that so that the wear would be more "even" throughout the components of the drive train and would all be replaced at the same time in the future?
Mal-wear spreads like a cancer. It's a lot of force on the drive train. Mixed components at best will wear all components faster and breaks the chain while driving at worst: do you feel lucky (esp. for a heavy hiker)? The time and labor justifies doing all at once unless maybe you are a full time mechanic with nothing better to do. AND then the Vs. 650 has a chain size smaller for the hp this bike delivers. I'd like a chain size larger, but I'm not going to re-engineer a masterpiece designed motorcycle.
 

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Yep. I had that backwards regarding the teeth. Sorry.
I wouldn't do anything to gear count. It will set your eyeballs back in your head, and you don't want to give up top end since it is already geared down to midrange boosted power. Cagers will eat you up on the expressway if you don't have your top end power, what's left after the midrange cam. ymmv
 

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do the 44t sprocket for sure. You read about it's uses, and seem to want it. A tamer first gear for slow speeds... Do it, I did and love it!

I would have the brake fluid bled, look at the air filter.. Most of the things I would inspect, you can do! Tire condition, brake condition, coolant level, air filter, suspension adjustments for your weight/preference....

Otherwise, just ride it, and refer to the maintenance schedule in the owners manual.
 

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In regards to buying and replacing sprockets & chain as a set, is that so that the wear would be more "even" throughout the components of the drive train and would all be replaced at the same time in the future?
I think it's because he has stock in those component makers. ;)
 

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If you have taler gearing, no doubt, you will get taller tickets and more of them. The Kawasaki engineers are pretty good and did an excellent job on th Vs. 650. It was made for heavy hikers like you, me, and Joe.

:censored:Your gears are not going to match up any more, and you will have dead spots in your throttle range in different gears which is unsafe on expressways around here. There are so many more useful things to do on the bike for safety and comfort, why would you want to overall degrade an award winning drive-train performance? It was 'made' for us heavy guys! Good luck!

 

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Your gears are not going to match up any more, and you will have dead spots in your throttle range in different gears which is unsafe on expressways around here.
what do you mean won't match up anymore? I also haven't noticed any flat spots or anything. In fact, throttle response, or rather final drive is smoother overall IME. It's all good either way, just a matter of preference!
 

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1. replace both sprockets and chain in a 'set',
2. always tip your mechanic: he will ALWAYS remember you.
That's harder to do now than it used to be. Most places have service writers in between you and the techs.
Dude! No wonder, if I saw you walking back towards my labor revenue producers, I'd drop either a steel cage or a 1/4" steel stranded cable net on top of you too. You are one scary looking creature!

 
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