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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Hello all. So for the initial 600 mile maintenance I saw the condition of bolts, nuts and fasteners requirement and thought to create a chart for myself so I wouldn't have to dig through the manual every time I wanted to check a critical bolt. To help out the community, especially new riders, I'd like to share it here. It does not replace the manual so if it is your first time doing this you may want to go find each page in the manual anyway. I tried to insert notes where I thought it was important but use at your own risk.

For the seasoned experts at working on the Versys maybe someone could check it over...some things like the front fender bolts I could not find specs so I guess it defaults to the page with unlisted torq specs. Another question...how the heck do you tighten the clutch bolt? I could get no socket in there.

Anyway, below is a link to a high res file. Feel free to share or print one for your garage.

High res file link:
https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/214426-manuals-workshop-owners-breakin-tightness-chart-torque.html


Also, I'm hoping to see how many people actually check all these bolts. I've done most but not all yet after 1500 miles. Let me know what you check.

 

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Nice; thanks. I try to go over my bikes once a year, checking every fastener I can find. Common issues on almost every bike I've owned are the exhaust collar bolts and the side stand pivot bolt, so those get checked every oil change.
 
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Hello all. So for the initial 600 mile maintenance I saw the condition of bolts, nuts and fasteners requirement and thought to create a chart for myself so I wouldn't have to dig through the manual every time I wanted to check a critical bolt. To help out the community, especially new riders, I'd like to share it here. It does not replace the manual so if it is your first time doing this you may want to go find each page in the manual anyway. I tried to insert notes where I thought it was important but use at your own risk.

For the seasoned experts at working on the Versys maybe someone could check it over...some things like the front fender bolts I could not find specs so I guess it defaults to the page with unlisted torq specs. Another question...how the heck do you tighten the clutch bolt? I could get no socket in there.

Anyway, below is a link to a high res file. Feel free to share or print one for your garage.

High res file link:
https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/214426-manuals-workshop-owners-breakin-tightness-chart-torque.html


Also, I'm hoping to see how many people actually check all these bolts. I've done most but not all yet after 1500 miles. Let me know what you check.

You will notice a link change, self explanatory:thumb::thumb::thumb:. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You're welcome guys.

Nice; thanks. I try to go over my bikes once a year, checking every fastener I can find. Common issues on almost every bike I've owned are the exhaust collar bolts and the side stand pivot bolt, so those get checked every oil change.
Thanks Doug. Have you done the swing arm pivot? That one looks hard to get to.
 

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Torquing

So as I actually get ready to use the handy chart I made I have a question. When checking bolts, do you have to loosen them all and retorque or just check torque and loosen and retighten IF you find it to be loose. Seems like a lot of opinions on the web. Not to beat a dead horse I just want to do it right.

https://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/checking-torque-already-tightened-bolts-553198.html
Torquing
I will give two examples, using car or truck wheel lugs. #1 you had your wife take her car in and had the snow tires swapped for the summer mounted tires and rims. You asked if they used a torques wrench and the answer from anyone would be I don't know unless it was a small garage and you could watch them. In this case, my experience is they use a impact wrench and torque is usually over the recommended, in a case like this I back off then re-torque myself, the reason being is the torque on the wheel is shared by all the wheel lugs, one that is torqued to a greater value than the others could either stretch or cause that stud to fail under severe braking or a skid.
#2 You installed the summer rims which are alloy and followed proper torque procedures ,a week after it is possible the hub-centric rims have seated slightly due to corrosion or oxide, in this case, go over all the wheel lugs with the proper final torque setting, no backing off required as any changes while mounted will not cause a over torque condition.

Anytime you are dealing with multiple bolts fasting a common device, such as a head of a cylinder, it is important to follow torque procedures and as a example when doing the valve shim, you are torquing inch pounds, you go cross pattern and work up to maximum torque in stages.Not full torque right from start.

When talking fasteners like the front brake calipers, bolts that share mounting either single or 2 bolts, I use blue loctite sparingly, I also use to a certain degree a lube torque chart which is lower torque. When doing these same bolts with no loctite, torque them once at proper torque, if after 10,000 KM it says to check, use your original setting. If you find them loose, pay attention, this may call for loctite.
Some fasteners like Volkswagen says to reach proper torque then 1/4 turn clockwise. Many of those bolts are one time use.

I hope that helps.
 

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My amateur opinion is a mix, much like onewizard.

Normally fasteners will loosen but not tighten, so in theory just hitting them with the torque wrench and tightening to spec is all you need to do. If properly torqued already, the wrench will click (or whatever yours does) without the bolt/nut moving. However, there are many reports of fasteners being overtorqued from the factory. Because of that I would loosen a bit and then tighten to spec any fastener that is critically important. Ones I wouldn't worry about are the ones that hold on plastic fairings, mirrors, foot pegs, etc.

Tbh I have not checked torque on fasteners I have not had reason to mess with.

Any kind of lube or lock-tite on the threads requires the torque be lower. So don't put those things on the threads before torquing unless the shop manual tells you to. If you want to lock-tite something that isn't called for in the manual, you will need to find the correct reduction in torque.

Use caution at the lower end of the range for your tool. e.g. if the lowest setting is 5, it will not be very accurate near that unless you have a really nice tool. There is one specific place this is really important on your Versys, which is the bolt that holds the rear brake lever on. It is an intentionally very soft bolt (don't really know why), with a very low torque. If you go above spec at all it will break off and you'll have to drill it out.

If you have to do a conversion of units, be very careful! Go slowly and double/triple check your conversion. Use a calculator or online tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks guys. I think I get it now. Fasteners are such a complex and interesting thing. Off to work on the bike!
 

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I'm kind of "anal" about torquing things, so I own FIVE torque wrenches in BC including two Snap-On ones, and THREE torque wrenches in AZ, ALL from Harbor-Freight (as are the two lower ones in the pic showing five - 1/4" and 3/8").
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm kind of "anal" about torquing things, so I own FIVE torque wrenches in BC including two Snap-On ones, and THREE torque wrenches in AZ, ALL from Harbor-Freight (as are the two lower ones in the pic showing five - 1/4" and 3/8").
Can never have too many tools. What do you do when going over your bike fasteddie? Loosen and then tighten or just retorque or some combo like we talked about above?
 

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...What do you do when going over your bike fasteddie? Loosen and then tighten or just retorque or some combo like we talked about above?
GENERALLY I don't re-do the fasteners, just 'do them' very carefully when I work on something, and I use blue Loctite in MOST of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
GENERALLY I don't re-do the fasteners, just 'do them' very carefully when I work on something, and I use blue Loctite in MOST of them.
Thanks Eddie.

Also, for any interested in this subject I will add some good articles here as I find them:

https://www.cycleworld.com/nutting-bolting-renewing-and-creating-luck-nick-ienatsch-tuesday

https://www.cycleworld.com/long-and-short-motorcycle-fasteners

https://www.cycleworld.com/2014/07/25/ask-kevin-if-i-lubricate-threads-or-use-a-threadlocker-should-i-reduce-the-tightening-torque
 
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