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Discussion Starter #1
http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/121402-valve-shim-check-valve-timing-valve-adjustment.html
Since this Photo Bucket posting thing I think I will attempt to post my method which is very similar to Fasteddie. One caution is make sure you are careful with the timing chain. My method requires absolutely no movement of the crankshaft after you get the measurements.

This is also something I recommend and related to the valve shim, throttle body sync buy about 3.5 feet of vacuum line, if a MK-1 or MK-2 get 1/8 or 3.2mm reinforced fuel vapor /vacuum line
for the 2015 FYI the capped vacuum line fittings have changed to 6 mm , I was able to buy 7/32 line at Parts Source and extended and capped off the lines at my Denali Compressor, so I can do a throttle body sync next time in 10 minutes,





( time to warm up and get all the test equipment hooked up). For clarity, it is almost impossible to get at the capped vacuum ports on the MK-3, even more impossible to get the caps back on. So I installed those lines permanently while doing the valve shim.
You will notice my last photo showing the other end of the vacuum lines and the throttle bodies removed with clean rags in the intake. Yellow is cylinder # 2 and red is #1
[

This is related to vacuum sync and the final process after the valve shim:

So after reading the posts about TPS and vacuum hose mod I decided to do this on my 2015 650 ABS, I only need to cut one wire tie , remove my stainless plugs from the vacuum lines and insert one of my vacuum couplings to each line, less than two minutes,


then hook up my Carbtune Pro vacuum gauges. I used a 1/4 X 1 1/2 hex head stainless bolt and cut the threads off to plug each line, filed a bit of a taper at the end of the bolts for easier insertion. Permanently install this were the capped off ports were, save the caps, tape them on the lines if you wish. I used coloured tape to identify #1 and #2 cylinder, red is 1 and yellow #2 ( taken from a electrician stand point of 3 phase, red, black / yellow, blue) I discovered that the valve shim is directly related to vacuum sync. Being able to check vacuum sync 10,000 miles later without taking things apart is a huge advantage, if the sync is off, good chance you have a tight valve, if it is bang on what you measured when completing the valve shim , chances are good that valves are OK at this 10,000 mile check.


The manual says section 2 pg 17 that spec at 1350 RPM is 284mmHg plus or minus 10mm, my gauges read in cmHg, so the range of spec is 27.4cmHg to 29.4cmHg, My gauge showed a balanced 28 cmHg, could be I was off on RPM a bit. To convert to inches , 1 inch = 2.5 cm or 1cm = 0.4 inches.I used the 28 cmHg as a baseline, and it was the same reading on my 07.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Optional Fuel Extension Line

For those looking at making a fuel extension line rather than buying the Kawasaki ( I don't recommend buying the Kawasaki , as you really need to make a 8mm / 5/16 Bundy adapter as shown, Be Aware, the manual says to remove the fuel line at the throttle bodies, if you own a 2015 or better, plan on doing lots of cursing before and after, I didn't make that adapter because I had nothing better to do) A alternative is in a new thread here: https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/13-member-only-group-rides-other-topics/219641-will-i-need-fuel-line-extension-synchronize-throttles-mk3.html March 2019

This is the optional fuel extension line, worth every penny, and changed to male / female using two 5/16 bung to 3/8 hose adapters for a additional $8 , plus a short piece of nylon 3/8 fuel line for free.
This is two 3/8 fuel line to 5/16 bung , joined with some free 3/8 nylon gas line, to convert the Kawasaki fuel extension line--as their line is designed to go directly onto the throttle bodies what a PITA I figured why remove more stuff---


You will notice I have the fuel line connected to the throttle bodies as that was before I was able to make the conversion , also note the original fuel line from the T.B. is above the rubber cover

I found this pre-made extension on Amazon , not sure about the male end having sufficient room for the retaining clip to engage.https://www.amazon.ca/Quick-release-fuel-line-coupling/dp/B00EU87V1Y





FYI I already have my bung adapter installed in this photo, I found a complete China one, with male/ female , that was 6 months ago, If I find it I will add it to this thread.


In this series of photos the fuel pump connector, mounting bracket and the extension line in operation, using the fuel extension line connected to the fuel line from the T.B. what a huge difference ( Male bung one end , female the other, I saw a fuel line on Ebay from China with this configuration for about the same price as the Kawasaki line, minus the cost of the two 5/16 bung adapters and 3/8 nylon fuel line), , note the foot peg seen directly below the table, connected on the shift lever side of bike.



Note I have Vaseline, which is a reminder, USE it on the bung adapter, yes initially I tried connecting to the throttle bodies and that was my original vac sync, I thought I was going to break something getting the fuel line off the T.B. Vaseline makes a huge difference. After I decided there needs to be a better way, hence the male conversion bung adapter



I am powering the fuel pump using the connector, removed from the frame.


I included pictures of the connector as it is not obvious as to releasing it.Photo shows the fuel pump release and push connector towards the back of the bike, photo shows the mounting tab.





fuel line to show clip position for removal, identical on all years except the 2015 has a steel bung, previous models were plastic



Take photos , easy to look back later
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Tools Required/ Vacuum Sync,External Vacuum Lines Added

Tools that you should have; telescopic swivel magnet( one that you can fix the final angle of the magnet), something to pickup a small watch or hearing aid battery as that is about the size of the shim.

A breaker bar, this is used to hold the crankshaft in the exact position.


Carbide 200 to 300 grit sand paper.A precision micrometer, best go with digital unless you are familiar using a precision one that measures to 0.0001 mm. A inch pound torque wrench 1/4 inch drive.



If you are working on a MK-3 a set of obstruction wrenches / S wrenches for the cam chain tensioner ( 12 mm either S or Half moon box).


Feeler gauges Go / No Go , as in the photo.



For a 2015 the air box has a single allenhead cap screw fastening both throttle bodies to the airbox, a long 3mm allen wrench makes it easy to remove.


For those wondering, that small piece of wood was my door passage set template for holesawing, I drilled a 5/16 by 0.125 depth hole on the center of the narrow side, this became my sanding block were I placed on top of my shim , better than sanding my fingernails, and easier.


I copied from another thread;What you'll need:
  • A sheet of paper listing the individual exhaust valve measurement and individual intake measurements, also have a spot for the shim measurement as measured when removed , you then either subtract or add what you need to reach spec, by listing the final measurement of the shim, you have a future reference , last would be the final shim measurement for each valve ,after you torqued everything and installed the cam chain tensioner.
    Or You can print the PDF at the bottom of the page.
  • telescopic magnet
  • inch pound torque wrench
  • 12 mm obstruction / half moon wrench if this is a 2015 650ABS for the cam chain tensioner
  • 1/2 inch breaker bar
  • small piece of 2X4 , drill a shallow 0.125 " hole 5/16 or 19/64 in diameter, on the 1 1/2 inch side, this is used as a sanding block for the shim , easier than trying to hold the shim with your fingers, unless you need your finger nails sanded too
  • a second piece of wood or other flat surface to place the carbide paper on, for sanding
  • A good metric socket set
  • Metric wrench set
  • Metric allen wrench set
  • Assembly Lube
  • Loctite
  • Anti-Seize
  • Rags
  • Assembly Lube
  • Metric Feeler Gauges, my preference is Go No Go
  • Zip Ties
  • Metric Micrometer
  • Shim kit or sandpaper
  • Manometer for performing throttle body vacuum sync

    This photo and second taken Feb.10, 2017



Please note March 2019
questions about idle speed using motorcycle tach as not recommended by the manual what I found was exceeding 1350 RPM the vacuum increased drastically, what I was looking for was a balanced reading, the service manual for the 2015 650 ABS page 2-16 and 2-17 states that at idle speed the vacuum should be 37.9 KPA or 284 mmHg plus or minus 10 mmHg , the carbtune pro reads in cmHg so 284 mmHg = 28.4 cmHg so the range using the carbtune pro is 27.4 to 29.4 cmHg , notice my gauges at just better than 28 cmHg and balanced


I have this in my album and am not sure if this was after my valve shim or was the 2007 , looks like I need to do another test. Added this on April 27, 2019.


For those that have never done this, I lost the original PDF form from a member that posted years ago, I have now modified and added to my liking and posted the PDF for those that wish to print it out.

Another member donated the other one
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Tank / Air Box Removal

My suggestion is to get the bike on a set of stands, make sure everything is stable. Have a camera handy, and paper and pen to take notes and your manual for torque values and references.I am giving my step by step for my 2015 650 ABS , I am posting areas where the manual was lacking and some verification's with photos.
Before the plastic is off, check your owners manual this shows how to remove the push rivets and the plastic, some really good photos.
Your seat needs to be removed.


You will need to draw the fuel line through the rubber, FYI I used a 3/16 slot screwdriver to release the fuel clip.Also a FYI, I used a dollar store siphon to drain my full fuel tank, as it is heavy and awkward, left about 1 gallon in the tank .
You should be in section 3 Fuel system
The tank sits on two rubber mounts at the front frame of the bike, the mounting for the seat and tank are combined , those two bolts need to come out, pull the tank towards the rear of the bike, also support the front by grabbing the front center of the tank. I propped the tank up with a short 2X4 while I pulled the fuel pump wiring through the rubber gasket, note which side of the frame the wire harness is on/comes through, the wrong side will cause the tank to sever the cable
Take photos , easy to look back later[/B

Also go to page 3-114 and 3-115 , some poor pictures of how to loosen the air box, also a photo of the air switching valve hose, in section 5-12 engine top end it says to remove the air suction valve , I did that strictly for inspection as my bike was new, then re installed it. Take photos, easy to look back later when you forget

Be aware my air box was extremely tight, wire harness and throttle cables were jammed against it. Speaking of throttle cables, you need to remove as per the manual, each person has their own way. also take note of how the rubber covering is, Take photos, easy to look back later when you forgetthe throttle and sub throttle sensors need to be unplugged as my method and Eddies uses the removal of the throttle bodies, plugs are gray and black, matching sockets.


Take note of the routing of these lines, also make sure none of them are pinched or plugged, found the clear one from the air box kinked from the factory. Below is intake air pressure sensor , vacuum line removed

The TPS and sub throttle connectors come off, notice the colour of each, this makes it easier to release the allen screw for the air box

The only picture I have handy to show the underside of the tank, have a couple pieces of 2X4 handy to rest the tank on as the fuel bung and pump are lower than the tank

This is the tank vent, sounds like a motor running at times, which is normal, here I have the clip released to pull the vent hose off the white vent


Notice the red piece is in the released position, the opposite side has a slot for releasing this with a flat 3/16 slot screwdriver, use Vaseline on the bung when installing, as it requires some gentle twisting and pulling to get off the tank, much easier after Vaseline.


Left side of fuel tank tank vent hose, remove the hose from the bottom of the white plastic piece, also remove the hose to the IAP sensor ( check the manual, as my notes don't say this)
Remove the tank and seat bracket, note the photo of the fuel line release clip red colour, a small slot screwdriver, note the Vaseline, apply a liberal amount on the bung of the fuel tank, it will make attaching and removal much easier next time Also release the fuel pump connector, this will be removed and pulled up through the rubber cover. Take photos, easy to look back later when you forget

FYI have a shallow tray or can to catch about 3 oz of fuel that will come out of the bung, expect the same on the fuel line--later we will be removing the fuel line from the throttle bodies and applying Vaseline there also. FYI the original set up for vacuum sync using the optional fuel extension line attaches to the throttle bodies, what a PITA, thus the conversion to male / female extension, no need to diddle around the throttle bodies. I propped up the tank using a 3/4 plywood piece while releasing the fuel line,work the connecter off the bung using gentle force and twisting side to side.

Go to page 3-109 to 3-115 of the service manual

You will need to draw the fuel line through the rubber, FYI I used a 3/16 slot screwdriver to release the fuel clip.Also a FYI, I used a dollar store siphon to drain my full fuel tank, as it is heavy and awkward, left about 1 gallon in the tank .The tank sits on two rubber mounts at the front frame of the bike, pull the tank towards the rear of the bike, also support the front by grabbing the front center of the tank. I propped the tank up with a short 2X4 while I pulled the fuel pump wiring through the rubber gasket, note which side of the frame the wire harness is on
Take photos , easy to look back later[/B
Be aware my air box was extremely tight, wire harness and throttle cables were jammed against it. Speaking of throttle cables, you need to remove as per the manual, each person has their own way. also take note of how the rubber covering is, Take photos, easy to look back later when you forgetthe throttle and sub throttle sensors need to be unplugged as my method and Eddies uses the removal of the throttle bodies, plugs are gray and black, matching sockets.

You need a really long 3mm allen wrench to release the air box clamp, look in the manual, this is just to the right of the sub throttle sensor, a good 5 turns, releases both clamps. Page 3-114 to 3-116



I took my air box apart , for pictures of the filter, the pictures above are a side and bottom view showing the single allen head socket screw
top of airbox removed for filter change only, if filter is good, you remove the complete airbox loosening the single allen head screw about 5 turns and pulling up and back.


Removing the airbox requires special attention,as to hose routing, one is to the crank case, which requires releasing a spring clip, also all the connectors are specific to their location, except for the stick coils, pay attention, they are colour coded, put a piece of tape on say cylinder 2 and make a note of it and take a photo .
FYI eventually the valve cover comes off, there is a special rubber deflector for the fan, I chose to pry out the two plastic rivets and used wire ties later to re attach it.I included the last 2 photos showing my removal of the plastic rivets for the fan deflector.Just to the left of the needle nose pliers is the air switching valve / suction valve pg 5-12



FYI the air box comes out as a complete unit,
the coloured tape is areas where my wire harness was tight and I added 125 LB black wire ties

the coloured tape is areas where my wire harness was tight and I added 125 LB black wire ties


I included the last photo as this was unnecessary to take the screws out of the air box unless a filter change was needed. That also means all those screws stay intact. Pull the air box back and up on a 45' angle. Make sure you are at 5-12 of the service manual, the air suction valve needs to be removed, be careful, pay attention to orientation of parts, place in a clean container, yes I like Folgers coffee cans. In fact I have all the hardware/ parts in containers specific to the stages of removal. So after the air box I started a new container.

I have included the photos that applied to my 2015, the wire harness was so tight against the air box, I couldn't get it out without prying the air box out, both right and left sides particularly the left rear as the air box travels back and up. You will see 100 pound black wire ties in these locations, and later you will see where I added a total of 6 wire ties, using coloured tape. The air box went back in a lot smoother than it came out.
Last photo shows the throttle and clutch cables tied back, to make valve cover easier to remove, using a shock cord, same one as for the breaker bar, you will see a round hook at the throttle / clutch cables, pulling back, so both my hands were free to pull the valve cover off, same for the air box.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Valve Cover / Throttle Body Removal

Go to page 3-112 to 3-115 , Whatever you do, make sure you identify #1 cylinder stick coil wiring before you remove things, the wire is colour coded but much easier to put tape on #1, then you know.


showing the throttle body, and associated connectors. Eddie has documented this in his post, and I agree, it makes it much easier to work on the valves / removing the valve cover, by pulling the Throttle bodies,
Below is my vacuum lines that are permanently brought out, and I had just disconnected them so I could remove the TB, this first picture you can see the vacuum barb to the left of the red vac line.Your TB will have rubber caps on these vacuum barbs.

Edited 2019;
Please Note: California models and others have a tee so extending and capping lines is not possible look in the service manual 2-16
See also post 22 of this thread





Throttle cables disconnected, others do it at the handlebars , to each their own





FYI they are held in place by some clamps around the rubber intake,you see a gear type clamp around the rubber ring for each cylinder, yes , loosen those and pull up on a 45' angle, all the plugs are idiot proof, and the wire ties are releasable look closely unless you feel like replacing them, as they were made to reuse .Notice the green wire going to the engine ground, this is a good time to clean and put some copper anti-size or dielectric grease on the engine ground. This is the connection to the negative battery terminal and also the negative feed for the starter motor.








place clean rags in these openings to keep out dirt. Also several wire ties are removable with a release on them, again all wiring and plugs are colour coded. I posted in post #1 the last photo of the throttle bodies removed with my external vacuum lines for syncing, you will notice the rubber boots with stainless clamp for each throttle body, clean cloths are in these inlets, make sure you remove all rags when reassembly, some people have forgotten, yup, doesn't run very good.

This photo shows #2 stick coil slightly raised,some twisting and pulling is required to get these out, as I have stated later, use dielectric grease sparingly as I directed below. Be carefull not to complete a path from top to bottom as this is high voltage , the shortest path or lowest resistance to ground is what happens, once you get tracking, you produce carbon, which is a good conductor.



Please note March 2019
questions about idle speed using motorcycle tach as not recommended by the manual what I found was exceeding 1350 RPM the vacuum increased drastically, what I was looking for was a balanced reading, the service manual for the 2015 650 ABS page 2-16 and 2-17 states that at idle speed the vacuum should be 37.9 KPA or 284 mmHg plus or minus 10 mmHg , the carbtune pro reads in cmHg so 284 mmHg = 28.4 cmHg so the range using the carbtune pro is 27.4 to 29.4 cmHg , notice my gauges at just better than 28 cmHg and balanced






last is with both stick coils removed. FYI I used dielectric grease on the very end of the boot and also the very top of the rubber seal around the stick coil, FYI the grease at the end is to aid in the boot completely covering the spark plug and ease of insertion and removal. You do not want grease anywhere else as high voltage tracking could occur and stick coil failure. The grease around the upper part is to act as a moisture barrier.

Note FYI to do with installing the valve cover,and removing the valve cover there are metal washers that fit in the hole for the spark plugs, the taper faces down, these can fall inside the engine when removing the valve cover.If possible remove the valve cover and work the gasket off the cover, before removing it, be cautious as the washers are stuck to the gasket strictly by oil, they could easily fall into the engine or down inside the bike and go unnoticed. If difficulty in removing the gasket, just make sure you lift and travel to the left of the motor, be aware of these washers and remove them, I had cylinder #2 fall into the area around cylinder 1 intake valve. After turning the valve cover over it became apparent what happened and where they go.



Take photos, easy to look back later when you forget
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Valve cover Off/Correct Valve Timing / Text/Key to doing it right

Follow the manual section 2 page 26 engine top end. A additional tool I used is a 1/2 inch breaker bar, used to position the camshaft for measuring clearances.
At this point all the stick coils and spark plugs have been removed , the cam chain tensioner is still intact , and you have your feeler gauge and micrometer ready.Note the intake cam cap bottom right bolt is almost out, the cam caps are honed in for their location, intake must go back on intake, hence doing all the intake then putting back together finger tight on the bolts. FYI , the bolts for the cam caps cam chain bearings etc. need to be placed in a dry container, when reassembly make sure there is no oil on the threads, as all torque is dry torque, if you get oil on the threads, buy a can of brake cleaner spray

Have paper orSee the bottom of post #3 Valve Shim Spec Form (1).pdf This is handy, print out several, use one as a working copy then use the second to copy all your readings, later to file for reference. I say two, because I made mistakes the first time and white out wasn't a option, looks neater than scratching out mistakes.




FYI it is assumed you have followed the manual before this starting point,under 2-26 valve clearance check, removing the stick coils and spark plugs, and this should also be the last thing you do after verifying all your work to correct valve shim clearance is correct , before installing the spark plugs due to the fact you don't want any compression hindering the precise movement necessary to measure these clearances.


Take your time , get it straight in your head, mark your manual. Page 2-26 valve clearance check. The text and accompanying photo are incorrect for 2/T i.e. 2 over T. Take some time and X out the 2/T on page 2-26, this could cause all kinds of grief if your cam chain came off as 2/T ( 2 over T not 2 backslash T )is your position for cam shaft timing marks as described in section 5-22 seeing is believing .

The 1/T text and photo are correct on this 2-26 page. Turn next to page 5-22, but book mark this 2-26 page, pg 5-22 says ; turn the crankshaft clockwise until the 2/T mark line A on the timing rotor is aligned with the notch B in the edge of the timing inspection hole C in the clutch cover , top photo . It continues with * If the clutch cover is removed, -------------until the mark 1/T mark line , notice the second photo A points to 1IT which is correct.

1/T is position for #1 cylinder Using the Go no Go feeler gauges, you should be checking the clearances and recording them using my PDF document
2/T is position for #2 cylinder Using the Go no Go feeler gauges, you should be checking the clearances and recording them using my PDF document

This is of utmost importance,
see bottom photo page 5-22, with the 2/T ( 2 over T ) mark in the inspection hole, note the photo ,the one with the breaker bar

this is your final position before you pull the cam cap bolts and start the valve shim corrections if they are needed ( so far with 2 Versys, My 07 at 24,000 KM and my 2015 at 11,000 KM, both had tight out of spec exhaust valves) .

This is the intake camshaft sprocket with wire tie in correct position to prevent skipping a tooth and averting a cam chain timing problem. At the camshaft timing position 2 I T , 2 over T you should see a white paint mark on the left intake cam sprocket IN and a white mark on the exhaust cam sprocket EX, this should line up with the top of your cylinder head casting.


I used my breaker bar and a bungee cord to hold this position, tied to my foot peg. Below is the exhaust camshaft sprocket at the 2/T timing position, 2 over T , not backslash
Note on the right side of this exhaust sprocket, very edge of casting you can see what appears to be a blue paint mark ( actually white) that is the timing mark



Now that this is clear as to position, you should have marked down each dimension for intake valves 1 to 4 and exhaust valves 1 to 4. My advice is to do the maximum clearance, even if the intake are in spec. Example, intake spec. at 0.15 to 0.21mm, all my valves when done were 0.21mm, all my exhaust were 0.31mm. when complete my throttle body sync vacuum was exactly balanced, just like factory!!

At this time you can then remove the cam chain tensioner if you are doing adjustments to the shims,the breaker bar is holding the camshaft in the 2/T position, 2 Over T.

I found a obstruction wrench makes it easy to remove this bolt ( 12mm).

FYI FastEddie mentioned difficulty in installing the cam chain tensioner, mark the side of the tensioner facing out before removing as it is possible to install backwards, also note that the ratchet mechanism needs to be released before installing, check the manual. I will discuss this further but the breaker bar is key to a easy valve shim Also install two wire ties one on the intake cam sprocket and one on the exhaust cam sprocket, this prevents making a mistake on the cam chain.Several good photos in https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/121402-valve-shim-check-valve-timing-valve-adjustment.html




this is the position for checking #1 cylinder valve clearance
2/T ( 2 backslash T ) is timing position for measuring #2 cylinder valves



------
page 2-26 periodic maint. B shows the incorrect symbol of 2/T I created some confusion as once you finish measuring, rotate crankshaft until you have 2 over T 2/T
this photo I have included shows the correct marking as to 2/T, 2 over T not backslash, which is clarified in the manual on 5-22 of the manual and again this should be the final position. This photo / position, is also key to cam chain timing marks which I will describe later on reinstall directions.
, this also shows the breaker bar

holding the cam shaft in the final position ,before taking anything further apart and the final position after putting everything back together as to cam cap bolts, and the cam chain tensioner ,exhaust sprocket with wire tie on cam chain also shown is shock cord holding breaker bar, this is the final position before taking the cam chain tensioner out and proceeding to remove cam cap of either intake or exhaust cam shaft, you should also be following the manual.
FYI it is assumed you have followed the manual before this starting point, removing the stick coils and spark plugs, and this should also be the last thing you do after verifying all your work to correct valve shim clearance is correct and before you cut the wire ties and reinstall the cam chain tensioner.

For ease of photography I did the exhaust side with photos but the intake had already been done first, as you will have chain slack on the intake camshaft after removing the cam chain tensioner. So here is the exhaust camshaft photos:


I should point out that the photo shown has the shim in place, waiting for the bucket, usually the shim and bucket come out as one, which is also why you should use a strong magnet, also don't take the magnet off with the bucket pointing down, for obvious reasons, ask me how I know this****Okay, luckily I had cleaned the garage floor, looking for something shiny and small, about the size of a carpenter ant. Actually I dropped it sanding it, but thought at this point we all could use some entertainment here:grin2:

Here is a photo of me pulling 2A exhaust valve ( see my PDF form post #3)


Here is 2A exhaust valve with the bucket removed


Here is 2B exhaust valve being pulled with 2A already back in place

photos of the bucket and the shim inside, held in place by the magnet
FYI the shim gets installed into the top of the valve stem using the magnet, and a wood kabob stick or long screwdriver , I don't trust a pair of needle nose pliers, you drop it it is gone!! I got pretty good at it, placed with the magnet then slid the magnet sideways, same with the bucket, try and hold the bucket off center using the magnet, as it is possible to have the magnet pull the shim back out when placing the bucket, I aligned the bucket so it was going in straight, then slide the magnet sideways, letting the bucket drop the final distance ( it doesn't really drop as the oil slows things down)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Start Of Valve Clearance Check / C/W photos

Several things I couldn't explain in post 8 due to a limit of text and photos.

On the 2015, as I said all shims were just spec or tight. I did all my shims so that my exhaust were all 0.31mm and intake all 0.21mm when done. Since you are on the intake side first, the cam chain has slack in it due to the removal of the cam tensioner.

I started on the intake cam side, did one valve at a time, when done I installed it then went on to the next valve, when all four intake shims and buckets were back in I installed the cam caps and bolts, tightened by hand then followed the tightening procedure in the manual.

BELOW IS THE REASON WHY I WAS ABLE TO INSERT MY CAM CHAIN TENSIONER BY HAND , REAL EASY.
*******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Now a very important thing, follow the same procedure doing the exhaust, however you will need slack on the front side of the exhaust sprocket, this is key why in the end, I had no problems getting my cam chain tensioner back in after I had reset it ( please read the manual on reset cam chain tensioner and note the photo / note on caution about reinserting without resetting). What I did is take my breaker bar and rotate about 5 degrees counter clockwise, this moves slack chain towards the exhaust cam sprocket, you can then store the cam shaft forward with a piece of wood like I did.


When you have completed your exhaust, follow my previous procedure and tighten all cam cap bolts as per manual.
The next key to success is , holding the exhaust cam sprocket, using your breaker bar, rotate clockwise 5',
to the point that, this moves the slack chain towards the intake camshaft and camshaft chain tensioner :thumb::thumb::thumb: :huh:




You should also note the position of the exhaust and intake sprocket timing marks, Note this photo is 2 over T


If you have a match which you should, next step , besides following the manual , would be to insert the reset cam chain tensioner, this should go in real easy with one hand and be easily hand tightened at least 2 turns. As to torque, the 2015 is almost impossible to use a torque wrench on, so you will need to use your own judgement when tightening this, most fasteners I found were over torqued from the factory.
*********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
At this point all the bolts fastening the cam caps should be checked again for torque value as per the manual, using the method described in the manual, several people have used a value of 60% on all bolts, then 80% and finally 100% as per spec in the manual. FYI all parts in reference to the cam caps are precision machined with very little free play,removing or installing these caps requires that things go in and come out squarely,easily and no forcing anything, also the caps are specific to their location, another reason to do the intake first and complete it, then the exhaust.



The manual says to rotate the engine several revolutions using the breaker bar or ratchet
At this point you should be recording your final measurements on the PDF sheet for future reference. Another FYI there are charts/ tables for finding the correct shim, this is confusing and not practical. What I and others did was take the measurement , say I measured the exhaust valve cylinder #2 valve 2B, it was 0.21mm which is out of spec, range is 0.22mm to 0.31mm, my final value would be 0.31mm-0.21mm= 0.10 mm to remove to get that clearance.

Again follow the manual and you should be able to check your work and measure your final values at 1It cylinder 1 and and 2/T cylinder 2
Record your final measurements on that PDF sheet and keep for future reference , if everything is spec, then time to install the valve cover and the reverse of taking the bike apart.

Note FYI to do with installing the valve cover, there are metal washers that fit in the hole for the spark plugs, the taper faces down, these can fall inside the engine when removing the valve cover. I found the best method of installing the valve cover was to place the rubber gasket into the valve cover rather than on top of the cylinder head, and placing the washers on the spark plug holes taper down. Before you tighten the valve cover bolts, make sure the rubber gasket around the plugs isn't protruding in the opening for the plugs. Also the right side of the gasket, the two semi circles, the manual says to use a sealing agent, I used a very small amount of silicone, and I mean small, as my gasket was a tight fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Valve Shim Complete/ Valve Cover On/ Vacuum Sync.

Photos and text to come later
I have 95% of my photos, my original posting of photos were lost due to deleting one post, the way the forum works is :

Under user CP click on it;
you will see in the column on the left near the bottom Miscellaneous;
below that is :Event Reminders & Attachments
clicking Attachments will show all JPEG photos, key to this working is You need to have posted it and left the thread, otherwise it is never saved. My advice if you are uploading numerous photos like I was; click save after say 30 minutes, check your user CP Attachments, they should all be there ,Then go back and Edit your post, Go Advanced--click Manage attachments and continue uploading.

I thought I would share this as I lost about 80 photos and the time in uploading.:mad::eek: It is all good now, part of the learning curve being a Mod, luckily it was my post and not a members
:thanx:

A little update, Thanks to Gigitt
I have learned something new and improved, posting inline photos, in that process I realized this site was lacking in capacity for members since the PhotoBucket demise, so I pulled a work order. Capacity is now 10 times larger for members ( 1000) and 20 times for mods (2000), if at any time this isn't sufficient , it can be increased. I deleted my jpeg photos and went inline. Once this thread is complete I will unstick it. Also the storing of inline photos happens to be in user CP, follow the link below to see how http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/8-verticalscope-forum-support-help-kawasakiversys-com/133602-how-post-inline-pictures-into-threads-no-photobucket.html
 

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Here's a little toy to help with the math of it all:

https://www.crfsonly.com/calculators/crf450-valve-shim-calc.php

Iff'n you don't feel like sanding things down there are shim kits avalable for about $70-80. The one I bought had 47 sizes, three each. The brand name is Hot Cams. They come in .05 increments.

HTH.
 

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I used this site to do my shim calculations. It is very comprehensive:
Triumph Universal Valve Shim Calculator Tool

I also found a Australian place that manufactures shims and has them in 0.02 sizes.
Most of the kits you find and I think OEM shims are all 0.05 or 0.025 sized

When I did my shims in 2014 on my 2012 Versys, I set mine as close to the upper/loose limit as this will allow for a longer wear interval.

For us Ozzies, the Australian site I bought my shims at is: Flat Shims
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A More Detailed Explanation

I've been using regular feeler gauges since the very early sixties.
I guess it's time to get up to date.

This explanation found on the net permitted me to see the usefulness of these go no go gauges.

"The stepped or go/no-go feeler gauge is more convenient to use in many cases than the common or flat blade type gauge. The blades of the stepped feeler gauge are of two thicknesses.
If the desired clearance is 0.011 inch, select the blade labeled ".010 - .012." One-half inch of the tip of a 0.012-inch blade is ground to a thickness of 0.010 inch.
If the 0.010-inch tip will enter the opening, but the blade stops when it reaches the 0.012-inch area, the clearance is between 0.010 inch and 0.012 inch or very close to the measurement desired, 0.011 inch."


Thanks for the tip! I'll be shopping.
Like I said, someone will explain it better!!

:thanx::thumb::thumb::thumb:
 

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Thought I would post this for anyone contemplating doing this. I learned a few things along the way I wanted to pass on and to also thank those on this forum who gave me good advice.

The process itself is reasonably well documented in the manual but there are a few things that might help in no particular order....

  • it's relatively easy to do yourself if you have a some basic mechanical skills, patience, and own a socket set and other basic tools
  • you need an environment to work where you can set aside the bike with the valve cover off for a few days while you order in new shims. I covered my engine with a lint free rag for this.
  • buy a roll of tear resistant, lint free shop towels instead of using paper towel
  • clean the top of the engine first and nearby areas with WD-40 or brake cleaner to prevent contaminates from entering the engine when you open it up
  • fill up the spark holes after removing the plugs with bunched up shop towel so you don't drop bolts or other parts into the cylinder, this will ruin your entire day. I did this twice however the holes where blocked so there were no issues. You don't need to remove plugs however you may want to check or change them. Removing or loosening them makes it easier to rotate the engine by hand.
  • use twisted wire to hold up the cam chain when you remove the cams. Dropping it into the unreachable deep recesses of the engine will ruin your entire day.
  • be extremely careful not to scratch the cam buckets when removing them with tools like needle nose plyers
  • put some grease or oil on cam bearings when reassembling them
  • make 100% sure cam timing is correct and rotate engine twice with rachet after cams are bolted in position and tensioner reinstalled, to ensure there is no obstruction with valves. Count out cam chain links multiple times (32) between cams as pictures in the manual are not precise on this.
  • try to set the valves clearances near the top of the range as they will elongate over time
  • measure everything multiple times until you see a pattern of consistency
  • purchase a device to measure shim thickness online or at Princess Auto/Harbor Freight for < $20. Any oil or dirt on shim will impact measurement
  • purchasing a shim kit ahead of time only makes sense if you are doing multiple bikes
  • put each shim and bucket into a labeled (Intake 1a, Exhaust 2b, etc.) zip lock sandwich bag so you don't get them mixed up. Cylinder 1 is on left of bike
  • it can be helpful to have two people when reinstalling cams but is not mandatory.
  • clean dry and then oil the air filter when putting stuff back together
  • do a throttle body sync after putting the engine back together as a valve clearance adjustment may throw this off although mine was bang on after this and required no adjustment
  • Removing the center bolt of the cam chain tensioner does not release the cam chain tensioner. You will need to remove the cam chain tensioner entirely with the two small bolts before removing cams from their mounts. Leave the center bolt alone for removal. Remove center bolt and spring only after it is removed from the engine and reset it by pushing it fully back fully into itself while pressing the ratchet release. Install back on bike without center bolt and spring with tensioner reset. Only install the spring and center bolt after cams are bolted in place and the tensioner is mounted on bike.
  • it should be fine to reuse the engine valve cover gasket unless you already have oil leaks. It will however be handy to have some RTV sealant on hand to use where directed by the manual during reassembly.
  • the intake and exhaust cams are different but are marked. the gears on the end are identical. no need to remove gears from the cams shafts as the manual suggests
  • I put everything back together only to discover the radiator shroud plate that attaches to the valve cover was still sitting under a paper towel on the workbench. Don't do this.
have on hand....
  • work light plus flashlight/light from phone
  • roll of shop towels
  • clean area on workbench or table to lay out removed parts plus old muffin tin or other to hold removed parts, maybe put down clean cardboard on workbench first
  • 8 zip lock bags with marker
  • measurement device for measuring valve shims accurately down to one, one ten thousands of a meter (eg. digital caliper) (accurate to at least + or minus 0.005mm
  • 2ft of wire
  • RTV sealant
  • metric feeler gauge
  • pen and paper
  • bolt/part retrieval magnet on arm to reach hard to retrieve dropped bolts and washers
 

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[*]be extremely careful not to scratch the cam buckets when removing them with tools like needle nose pliers
I SUGGEST that you remove the buckets w/ a magnet - the shims will stick TOO! (That way NO scatches!) I use one of those 'telescoping' magnets for this job.
 

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[*]try to set the valves clearances near the top of the range as they will elongate over time
I believe that you mean that the valve clearances will TIGHTEN over time, so always set the valves to the LOOSE end of their range.
 

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[*]it can be helpful to have two people when reinstalling cams but is not mandatory.
In the (several) times I've "done" my valves, I've NEVER removed the cams. I secure the chain to the cam-sprockets w/ zip-ties (so they CAN'T 'slip' a tooth or two...), then just lift up on the LEFT end to get the buckets out w/ my magnet.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Friction / Torque/ Dry / Wet/ wear surface

1. Be careful. I've NEVER had to replace any of 'em.

2. Just checked my '15 SERVICE MANUAL - it says "...Cylinder head cover bolt washers should be metal side up...". I've "done" valves on my three V650s many times, and have just done what the MANUAL says to do, and that's on TWO GEN 1s as well as the Gen 3.

:goodluck:
The reason for metal up, is the head of the bolt creates friction, the rubber could be easily damaged while turning the head of the bolt, if the washer were to bind on the valve cover. With the rubber side down against the valve cover, tow things occur, one the washer acts as a seal, prevents the washer from turning while torquing and allows some expansion when the motor heats up, I guess that is 3.Proper torque at ambient temperature, also keep in mind, whendoing the valve shim check, keep all bolts in a separate container, oil free , this applies to the casting threads as well, oil free, I have used brake cleaner to remove traces of oil. Many never consider the original assembly of the motor, the oil was added after assembly, all bolts were oil free
Wet torque ( as in lubed threads) is about 60 % that of dry torque, so very easy to strip aluminum threads if you aren't careful . https://www.antiseize.com/PDFs/torque_specifications.pdf

Lubed torque value https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/torque-lubrication-effects-d_1693.html
 
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