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Are you trying to determine how much you will save by doing them yourself? Or are you willing to go somewhere else to get them done? If neither of these, then you are just asking for frustration. 4 cylinder bikes where the heads are buried under many other parts are some of the most expensive valve checks and adjustments.

After doing my Concours 1400 which felt like I was doing open heart surgery, I decided I was done with online 4 cylinder motorcycles.

If you are going to have the dealer or an indy shop do it, find one you trust.
 

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I will be farming it out to the Kawasaki dealership. Just curious as to cost to perform the service.
Everything varies based on where you live and the local economy. Richer areas can get away with charging more. High cost areas means they have to charge more to survive. Low cost and lower income areas are going to charge the least.

Telling you what my country dealer in Tennessee charges isn't going to help you if you are in Los Angeles. It will just make you pissed, but it is all relative because wages for the same occupation are higher in LA.

If you are really curious, ask your dealer what they charge for various bikes, and if they are a multi brand dealer what the intervals are. Yamaha has many of their bikes on 24,000-26,000 mile intervals
 

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2016 Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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I am not MotoAndy, but as one who does all his own work on bikes, I like his vids, quite good.

The other thing the OP can do is delay this valve check to a longer interval........ and while it's apart, intentionally and anally re-shim all valves to ~70% of max clearance and uniformly. Of course, one does a throttle body sync after that since sync will change with valve clearance changes. Bike will definitely run smoother and one can definitely extend the next interval to at least double. Likely no changes needed on the next one.
 

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I am not MotoAndy, but as one who does all his own work on bikes, I like his vids, quite good.

The other thing the OP can do is delay this valve check to a longer interval........ and while it's apart, intentionally and anally re-shim all valves to ~70% of max clearance and uniformly. Of course, one does a throttle body sync after that since sync will change with valve clearance changes. Bike will definitely run smoother and one can definitely extend the next interval to at least double. Likely no changes needed on the next one.
Is that right? I'm a new owner of a Versys (just passed 400 miles on the odometer), but on the Ninja 250, the valves always tightened on me. So you would have to set the clearance a little high, if you wanted the lengthen the interval.
 

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On the 650s they TIGHTEN, so I (along w/ other 'long-timers'), remove shims and sand them down to the required size to bring the clearances to the MAX end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On all bucket and shim valve trains, the clearances always get smaller not bigger.
In-between size Pro-X shims available at RockyMountainATV.
If they get looser you have wear problems somewhere in the valve system. As for tightening. How long have we been using unleaded fuel?? Seems like for the price we pay for these bikes, Kawasaki could spring for hardened valve seats.
 

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...Seems like for the price we pay for these bikes, Kawasaki could spring for hardened valve seats....
I believe you will find that they ARE hardened, otherwise you'd probably need to adjust them monthly.
 

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2016 Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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It's not likely valve seat wear, it's the valve heads doing their initial cupping especially the exhausts which run much hotter. Once settled in, should be able to re-shim and further changes should go at a much slower rate.
 

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Once settled in, should be able to re-shim and further changes should go at a much slower rate.
My 2009 Ninja 250 is much older, of course, but I still had to adjust the valves at close to 30K. I did my first adjustment at around 19K after I bought the bike at 13K. And I wasn't the first one, because there were aftermarket shims under some buckets.

At 30K, the valves were less out of spec than at 19K, but I still had to adjust, I think, 3 out of the 8 valves.
 

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2016 650 Versys, 2022 V85 Guzzi, 2017 V7III Guzzi, 2001 EV Guzzi 2016 V7II Guzzi
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It's all about how you drive it. That 250 is wound up all the time. A V1000 just idles along with most drivers. The 650 is inbetween. Manufacturers just have to assume the worst.
 

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My local dealership charges $140/hr for labor, plus shop supplies and gaskets. A few years ago, I checked quotes for a Valve Check on my GL-1800. That one was 4.5 hours plus materials. I’m guessing an Inline 4 like the V1000 is at least 5 hours minimum so I’m guessing $700 in labor plus parts and shop supplies…. $850 would be a good ball park number.

I plan to do my own if I keep my V1000. But I‘ll probably stretch that service interval just a bit… 15,000 interval seems too frequent, especially given that my bike rarely sees anything over 7000 on the tach. I don’t ride it like a hooligan, but I will hustle it through a good set of curves at a spirited pace :cool:
 
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