Kawasaki Versys Forum banner
21 - 32 of 32 Posts

Registered
2022, Kawasaki, Versys 650
Joined
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
should be ok ..i had a a set of piug bars on the mk 3 and they went straight on the mk4 no issues at all


The second is exactly mine, only without central stand but with lower saddle, original top case 47l and side luggage 2x27l, plus SW-Motech's skid plate, plus Vsysto's cameras. I don't post the photo here 'cause 've added thick grey foam (tube thermal isolation) to the handle guards and the engine sliders and my brother-in-law says being becoming a spectacle myself ! (these days I'm doing slow manoeuvre drills, trying to acquire the Japanese technique for U-turns, so falls are in order...)
The front PUIG bars are also incompatible with the original fog lights (did buy and return), but I see there a nice alternative (the European configuration 'Grand Tourer' has them already). Kawasaki's own GPS plate is just impractical, forcing to look down and lose sight of the road...
 

Registered
Joined
55 Posts
sound like you having fun there antonias ..i wonder what japaniese u turns are

if you have trouble with a turn maby its better to take a step back and start over
i have done literally thousands of tests for people it used to be my job .. and over the years the u turn on the mod 1 part has been one of the more challenging things for people

the tequnique is to get the revs busy .. slip /ride the clutch and as soon as u balence hoild it with the rear brake ..imgine you had one finger on the brake to hold the speed if you need to press hard you have too much clutch ..its a busy engine and fine clutch a bit like when u reverse a car in tight place if that makes sense..the clutch sheould never ever be fully engaged when turning

best progression is to get this sorted out in a straight line so that when u flex the brake a little more either way you slow down and speed up jogging pace walking pace and maby under that when you get used to it ..rock steady throttle fine clutch and dismiss any thoughts that the speed of the turn is controled with your right hand ..it does nothing ..your right foot controls the speed
a lot of lads /lases get this sorted and then sometimes they hold on a bit tight so when you turn to the right the throttle drops away and to the left it comes on ...sit on the bike stationaly and hold 2500revs lock to lock its not a easy asit sounds .. keep your fingers loose and you will find its the palm of your hand thats doing the most to control it .. you can ride along in a straight line and hold throttle with just your little finger ..point being you dont need to hold tight too tight it causes problems when the lock is used .involentary movement on the throttle even a few mm is not desirable so be aware of that ..a steady throttle gives a steady turn ..steady throttle fine clutch and right foot only to hold the pace
once you have got it sorted in a straight line ..mark a 30ft turn and then go round in a ark ..make sure the throttle stays rock steady and the rear brake does hold the bike back ..right foot only to control speed /turn ..bit by bit reduce the turn as your confidence buils ..steer rather than lean the slower the turn the least amount of lean you need there is a counterbalence tqunique but this is the best starting point and id leave that alone for now .at the end of the turn ride the bike out two three bike lengths and stop straight with your rear brake only
always set off with your right foot up so you have instant access to the brake as soon as you balence hold the speed with your right foot
best way to start mastering the turns is to get control in a straight line first ..take a bit of practice but its really the only way to control it properly ..wont matter if your facing uphill downhill or with big cambers as each turn is the same with busy revs and the rear brake
eventually you will be able to do them blindfold
the advanced lads are asked to do twelve walking pace turns in 18 feet 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th ..6th5th4th3rd2nd first and then stop with the cltch becoming finer and finer and the touch on the brake being in grams rather than pounds ..thats not for now of course but its where it can go and it has no other use after third other than a disipline excersise
once your ok with u turns move on to figure of 8s where the lock changes concentrate on zero throttle movment both ways
may be a good call finding a instructor and paying for a few sessions ..even use there bikes ..probly for the price of a set of engine bars you will turn without needeng any after your done
so many lads have never had lessons and you watch em feet dangling down and fingers over the front brake not sayin thats you but its so common its untrue
..i could easily sort your turning out in one . afternoon for nowt if you lived nearer ....get control in straight line then long easy turns you can abandon and tighten them up ..car park start at 7 bays and aim for two in the end ......keep well
 

Registered
2022, Kawasaki, Versys 650
Joined
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
sound like you having fun there antonias ..i wonder what japaniese u turns are

if you have trouble with a turn maby its better to take a step back and start over
i have done literally thousands of tests for people it used to be my job .. and over the years the u turn on the mod 1 part has been one of the more challenging things for people

the tequnique is to get the revs busy .. slip /ride the clutch and as soon as u balence hoild it with the rear brake ..imgine you had one finger on the brake to hold the speed if you need to press hard you have too much clutch ..its a busy engine and fine clutch a bit like when u reverse a car in tight place if that makes sense..the clutch sheould never ever be fully engaged when turning

best progression is to get this sorted out in a straight line so that when u flex the brake a little more either way you slow down and speed up jogging pace walking pace and maby under that when you get used to it ..rock steady throttle fine clutch and dismiss any thoughts that the speed of the turn is controled with your right hand ..it does nothing ..your right foot controls the speed
a lot of lads /lases get this sorted and then sometimes they hold on a bit tight so when you turn to the right the throttle drops away and to the left it comes on ...sit on the bike stationaly and hold 2500revs lock to lock its not a easy asit sounds .. keep your fingers loose and you will find its the palm of your hand thats doing the most to control it .. you can ride along in a straight line and hold throttle with just your little finger ..point being you dont need to hold tight too tight it causes problems when the lock is used .involentary movement on the throttle even a few mm is not desirable so be aware of that ..a steady throttle gives a steady turn ..steady throttle fine clutch and right foot only to hold the pace
once you have got it sorted in a straight line ..mark a 30ft turn and then go round in a ark ..make sure the throttle stays rock steady and the rear brake does hold the bike back ..right foot only to control speed /turn ..bit by bit reduce the turn as your confidence buils ..steer rather than lean the slower the turn the least amount of lean you need there is a counterbalence tqunique but this is the best starting point and id leave that alone for now .at the end of the turn ride the bike out two three bike lengths and stop straight with your rear brake only
always set off with your right foot up so you have instant access to the brake as soon as you balence hold the speed with your right foot
best way to start mastering the turns is to get control in a straight line first ..take a bit of practice but its really the only way to control it properly ..wont matter if your facing uphill downhill or with big cambers as each turn is the same with busy revs and the rear brake
eventually you will be able to do them blindfold
the advanced lads are asked to do twelve walking pace turns in 18 feet 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th ..6th5th4th3rd2nd first and then stop with the cltch becoming finer and finer and the touch on the brake being in grams rather than pounds ..thats not for now of course but its where it can go and it has no other use after third other than a disipline excersise
once your ok with u turns move on to figure of 8s where the lock changes concentrate on zero throttle movment both ways
may be a good call finding a instructor and paying for a few sessions ..even use there bikes ..probly for the price of a set of engine bars you will turn without needeng any after your done
so many lads have never had lessons and you watch em feet dangling down and fingers over the front brake not sayin thats you but its so common its untrue
..i could easily sort your turning out in one . afternoon for nowt if you lived nearer ....get control in straight line then long easy turns you can abandon and tighten them up ..car park start at 7 bays and aim for two in the end ......keep well
Thanks mate, I meant motogymkhana-style.
My ambition is achieving it quickly within a very narrow road like this:

What you write is true and it is easier by setting KTRC to 2. With KTRC 1 and first gear, I see trouble ;-)
The Japanese technique won't use the clutch much, it is rear brake and throttle.
Another variation, but for racing mostly (which I don't intend to execute!) is to front brake while approaching the corner, then rear brake while turning.
And I think gear no less than 2nd as I unexpectedly found myself in the neutral zone and God knows why I didn't fall :)
I will go out later to repeat along with your hints (if it doesn't snow, although over here it drops more salt than snow, heaven forbid...)

rgds
AK
 

Registered
Joined
55 Posts
yer quite a good skill but relys totally on getting right and carrying speed ..not really good for somone who is struggling ..not good with a with a passenger and full luggage ..
id say its not really what you want to be starting out with as if it goes wrong it goes proper wrong any mistake with the thottle will not end well if you dont use the clutch ....start with the slow riding straight get used to the rear brake ..take that into shallow turns dont use kerbs use lines /parking bays ..give yourself some breathing space run off space to allow errors ...keep well
 

Registered
2022, Kawasaki, Versys 650
Joined
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
yer quite a good skill but relys totally on getting right and carrying speed ..not really good for somone who is struggling ..not good with a with a passenger and full luggage ..
id say its not really what you want to be starting out with as if it goes wrong it goes proper wrong any mistake with the thottle will not end well if you dont use the clutch ....start with the slow riding straight get used to the rear brake ..take that into shallow turns dont use kerbs use lines /parking bays ..give yourself some breathing space run off space to allow errors ...keep well
Tnx, slow ones I can, I want the fast ;)
 

Registered
Joined
137 Posts
@antonis Good news, the T-Rex crash bar fits the 2023. I installed it last night, together with the luggage guard. It seems like a good product. The crash bar has a slider on it, which looks a bit goofy, but I'm sure it's effective. If we were all about looks, we probably wouldn't have bought a Versys in the first place, haha!

I emailed T-Rex about it, and I sent them a bunch of photos with some installation tips. So I think they will probably update the website soon to reflect that the products fit the 2023 model.

If you (or anybody) do buy them: when you are installing the crash bar, for a while you may think it will not clear the exhaust pipe. This is not true. Keep every bolt very loose. Once you put the left and right sides together, zip tie a 1/8" plywood piece between the crash bar and the exhaust pipe to keep the distance during installation. When you cut the zip tie after the installation, the spacer will slide out easily.

Use a torque wrench. The bolt must be tighter than you think, but you don't want to strip them.
 

Registered
2022, Kawasaki, Versys 650
Joined
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
@antonis Good news, the T-Rex crash bar fits the 2023. I installed it last night, together with the luggage guard. It seems like a good product. The crash bar has a slider on it, which looks a bit goofy, but I'm sure it's effective. If we were all about looks, we probably wouldn't have bought a Versys in the first place, haha!

I emailed T-Rex about it, and I sent them a bunch of photos with some installation tips. So I think they will probably update the website soon to reflect that the products fit the 2023 model.

If you (or anybody) do buy them: when you are installing the crash bar, for a while you may think it will not clear te exhaust pipe. This is not true. Keep every bolt very loose. Once you put the left and right sides together, zip tie a 1/8" plywood piece between the crash bar and the exhaust pipe to keep the distance during installation. When you cut the zip tie after the installation, the spacer will slide out easily.

Use a torque wrench. The bolt must be tighter than you think, but you don't want to strip them.
Thanks mate, just thinking yesterday to send you a note, but you're quick. So, conclusion, since 2023 and 2022 have SAME part no. I feel confident of ordering it (specifically the luggage one, since the original fog lights forced me to buy the original engine sliders...). Will you post the pictures somewhere pls?
:)
PS Just a little word: versys looks very nice, though perhaps not suitable to old farts like me (64) but still, flawless finish, not?
 

Registered
Joined
137 Posts
Thanks mate, just thinking yesterday to send you a note, but you're quick. So, conclusion, since 2023 and 2022 have SAME part no. I feel confident of ordering it (specifically the luggage one, since the original fog lights forced me to buy the original engine sliders...). Will you post the pictures somewhere pls?
:)
PS Just a little word: versys looks very nice, though perhaps not suitable to old farts like me (64) but still, flawless finish, not?
Photos for limited time.

I think the Versys is not the ugliest bike, but I really like the slick sports bike look, which the Versys isn't. At the age 47, I may be too young to appreciate the good looks of the Versys. :)
 

Registered
2022, Kawasaki, Versys 650
Joined
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Photos for limited time.

I think the Versys is not the ugliest bike, but I really like the slick sports bike look, which the Versys isn't. At the age 47, I may be too young to appreciate the good looks of the Versys. :)
Thanks for the pictures, I appreciate. I initially wanted a classic one (Norton looks) but once I got the market situation last fall (no planning, no deliveries, no price forecast, nothing) I just picked up the one fit to my specs (versatility, acceleration, rich accessories and m+s tires) from the already available ones.
I don't regret.

Enjoy it.馃弽
 

Registered
2022, Kawasaki, Versys 650
Joined
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Hello friends,

I had the opportunity to literally test custom-made crash bars from a French (Paris-based) supplier. Here is an example for Versys: CRASH CAGES VERSYS 2015-2023 (though it is in French you may use Google translation if needed).
I followed a course on the Japanese technique of maneuverability (Anti Pilote de Ligne Droite 鈥 Nous proposons des stages moto) where falling down is bound to happen. By testing the full-lock technique with a cbr600r with usual market crash bars, I hurted my kneecap and also had to put effort to escape from underneath the bike (it goes without saying that I wore a complete protection jacket and trousers). I afterwards went on training with the cbr500r that was equipped with the custom bars from the supplier above. That protection kept the bike so far from the ground, that it also saved my knees from the strong impact, apart from leaving enough room to quickly get up and lift the bike.
Of course these bars are meant for competition (no damage to the bike) and not for showing off, but this is exactly my cup of tee (no damage, I am not competitive at all :giggle:)

cheers
Antonis
 

Registered
Joined
137 Posts
Hello friends,

I had the opportunity to literally test custom-made crash bars from a French (Paris-based) supplier. Here is an example for Versys: CRASH CAGES VERSYS 2015-2023 (though it is in French you may use Google translation if needed).
I followed a course on the Japanese technique of maneuverability (Anti Pilote de Ligne Droite 鈥 Nous proposons des stages moto) where falling down is bound to happen. By testing the full-lock technique with a cbr600r with usual market crash bars, I hurted my kneecap and also had to put effort to escape from underneath the bike (it goes without saying that I wore a complete protection jacket and trousers). I afterwards went on training with the cbr500r that was equipped with the custom bars from the supplier above. That protection kept the bike so far from the ground, that it also saved my knees from the strong impact, apart from leaving enough room to quickly get up and lift the bike.
Of course these bars are meant for competition (no damage to the bike) and not for showing off, but this is exactly my cup of tee (no damage, I am not competitive at all :giggle:)

cheers
Antonis
Wow these protrude really far out! I'm glad you are happy with it, but I wouldn't want one. The look is one thing, but also, if you have a higher speed accident (say 40 km/h or above), the protruding rods have a tendency to dig into the dirt or a pothole, an catapult the bike, increasing the damage.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top