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2018 Kawasaki Versys 300x TRex crash, skids, risers, O2 elim, 15T sprocket,Shinko 804/5, Led lights
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks all for helping in this task, ended up spending around $135. 2 ea. 8.2. mm valve stems, 5 goop tubes, 3 trips to tire shop and lunch. Hope this info will save you some time if you decide to do this conversion.
My first attempt at sealing the spokes was a failure since I applied a small amount of goop over the spoke and began to rotate the wheel causing the goop sag out of position. The result was a mounted front tire with air leaks on several spokes. After having tire removed I went back to removing all the dried goop using brake cleaner, wire brush and pick to start from scratch. The following photos will show how much goop i applied and allowed to set for 24hrs. I then added more to any questionable areas to create an entire band around each wheel. As you can see my rear tire had a puncture that had to be plugged when mounted.
182706
182707
182708
182709
 

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Good luck! Be sure to update wether it's thousands of miles with no issues or why did I do this to myself? I'll be interested to hear about it either way!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good luck! Be sure to update wether it's thousands of miles with no issues or why did I do this to myself? I'll be interested to hear about it either way!
So far has not been perfect,
182715
even with that much material applied I had 1 spoke with tiny air leak which I dealt with today. As you can see after riding the goop seeped into the spoke cavities and I refilled all of them just to be safe. I also used the same size valve stem, so a factory sized tube can always be used as backup. Will update soon.
 

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Sorry man.

If you haven't noticed, I commented on your original post, I generally believe this to be a bad idea haha. I'm gonna say it's probably 60/40 in my years of forum cruising with people who have success with this vs those that don't and that's not very good odds.

In the spirit of trying to help you succeed there is some sort of tape that people use that they put on top of the goop that is supposed to help. Might look into that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry man.

If you haven't noticed, I commented on your original post, I generally believe this to be a bad idea haha. I'm gonna say it's probably 60/40 in my years of forum cruising with people who have success with this vs those that don't and that's not very good odds.

In the spirit of trying to help you succeed there is some sort of tape that people use that they put on top of the goop that is supposed to help. Might look into that.
I did see your comment, that's why I replied to it. I thought about the tape too, but Kris and many others have had success with the goop stuff and I believe can make it work. Worst case would be HD tubes, but changing a tire out in the field or even in a garage is a pain. Thanks for advice.
 

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To be honest just gonna say it. I've never had a flat. I've bent rims, I've ridden rock, I've ridden sand, I've pulled over into horrible crash lanes, I own a hawk 250 Chinese dirt bike... I've never had a flat on anything with two wheels...

I think people hype themselves up over a problem made popular by the internet.

So let's normalize this...

People think about how common flats have been on their cars... But think of this, cars have 4 tires not 2 and your average car has what, let's be kind and say 100k miles after 5 years. Your average car also has a contact patch on each tire of again well be kind and say 6 inches (most of my cars would have been 8-12) while a bike has 2 at most. Motorcycles have 2 tires and have what an average of yet again let's be kind and say 15k miles after 5 years...

So your car has 6 times the amount of miles, is touching the ground with 2 times as many tires, that are at least 3 times as wide...

So 6 x 3 x 2 you are 36 times more likely to get a flat driving a car in your life than on a motorcycle.

In my driving life 20 years I have experienced 1 flat tire on my personal cars.

Multiply the number of years I have driven, by the number of flat tires I have had, by the associated motorcycle to car ratio of 36...

(20years/1flat) x 36 = 720 years/flat

Which means in 720 years of motorcycle riding I will have had the same probability of getting a flat as I have had in the last 20 years of my life driving cars.

That's a risk I am willing to take.

That's just my perspective, my theory...

1/36 motorcycle riders will get a flat some time in the next 20 years and be cussing my father's name.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To be honest just gonna say it. I've never had a flat. I've bent rims, I've ridden rock, I've ridden sand, I've pulled over into horrible crash lanes, I own a hawk 250 Chinese dirt bike... I've never had a flat on anything with two wheels...

I think people hype themselves up over a problem made popular by the internet.

So let's normalize this...

People think about how common flats have been on their cars... But think of this, cars have 4 tires not 2 and your average car has what, let's be kind and say 100k miles after 5 years. Your average car also has a contact patch on each tire of again well be kind and say 6 inches (most of my cars would have been 8-12) while a bike has 2 at most. Motorcycles have 2 tires and have what an average of yet again let's be kind and say 15k miles after 5 years...

So your car has 6 times the amount of miles, is touching the ground with 2 times as many tires, that are at least 3 times as wide...

So 6 x 3 x 2 you are 36 times more likely to get a flat driving a car in your life than on a motorcycle.

In my driving life 20 years I have experienced 1 flat tire on my personal cars.

Multiply the number of years I have driven, by the number of flat tires I have had, by the associated motorcycle to car ratio of 36...

(20years/1flat) x 36 = 720 years/flat

Which means in 720 years of motorcycle riding I will have had the same probability of getting a flat as I have had in the last 20 years of my life driving cars.

That's a risk I am willing to take.

That's just my perspective, my theory...

1/36 motorcycle riders will get a flat some time in the next 20 years and be cussing my father's name.
Your information sounds correct, must be an engineer or mathematically inclined. As I come from more of a 4x4 overlanding background, I see this conversion as more of a preventative precaution. If I planned on pavement only I would not bother with this project, but I purchased the 300x and have built it to cruise off road trails also.
 

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I wish there was a better solution out there I could steer you towards. There was a company called tubliss that was selling what seemed to be actual legit conversion kits but even those tend to have horrible reviews and forum tales attached to them they were hot stuff gearing up to sell kits for all sizes of wheels and tires but I think they found out something along the lines of, "their product is only really suited for dirt bikes" so I think they only sell 18/21. That's all anecdotal information I have heard from various sources over the years.

Again not recommending them but maybe worth looking into? If nothing else it's cool to read about.

I have seen the goop work for people as well generally if memory serves me correctly it's been about half dollar sized individual "dollops" on each spoke followed by the application of some sort of tape that I mentioned previously.


 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wish there was a better solution out there I could steer you towards. There was a company called tubliss that was selling what seemed to be actual legit conversion kits but even those tend to have horrible reviews and forum tales attached to them they were hot stuff gearing up to sell kits for all sizes of wheels and tires but I think they found out something along the lines of, "their product is only really suited for dirt bikes" so I think they only sell 18/21. That's all anecdotal information I have heard from various sources over the years.

Again not recommending them but maybe worth looking into? If nothing else it's cool to read about.

I have seen the goop work for people as well generally if memory serves me correctly it's been about half dollar sized individual "dollops" on each spoke followed by the application of some sort of tape that I mentioned previously.

Tubliss for dirtbikes only too bad seems like a great invention. Will mount the rear tire today, update later.
 

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To be honest just gonna say it. I've never had a flat. I've bent rims, I've ridden rock, I've ridden sand, I've pulled over into horrible crash lanes, I own a hawk 250 Chinese dirt bike... I've never had a flat on anything with two wheels...

I think people hype themselves up over a problem made popular by the internet.

So let's normalize this...

People think about how common flats have been on their cars... But think of this, cars have 4 tires not 2 and your average car has what, let's be kind and say 100k miles after 5 years. Your average car also has a contact patch on each tire of again well be kind and say 6 inches (most of my cars would have been 8-12) while a bike has 2 at most. Motorcycles have 2 tires and have what an average of yet again let's be kind and say 15k miles after 5 years...

So your car has 6 times the amount of miles, is touching the ground with 2 times as many tires, that are at least 3 times as wide...

So 6 x 3 x 2 you are 36 times more likely to get a flat driving a car in your life than on a motorcycle.

In my driving life 20 years I have experienced 1 flat tire on my personal cars.

Multiply the number of years I have driven, by the number of flat tires I have had, by the associated motorcycle to car ratio of 36...

(20years/1flat) x 36 = 720 years/flat

Which means in 720 years of motorcycle riding I will have had the same probability of getting a flat as I have had in the last 20 years of my life driving cars.

That's a risk I am willing to take.

That's just my perspective, my theory...

1/36 motorcycle riders will get a flat some time in the next 20 years and be cussing my father's name.
You have been lucky. I’ve had 5 which works out to one every 35,000 miles. This includes one on my 300X with 33,000 miles on it. I have also helped 4 other fellow riders fix one on the road. This is much more than on 4 wheels. Put 517,000 miles on my Honda truck with one flat.
 

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Wow that's some bad luck. Must be the highway I guess with those kinds of miles I try my best never to get on the highway whenever possible.

I would love to be able to have the piece of mind that all I had to carry/do was jam a plug into it if the time came. I wish there was a solid repeatable method to do what Bal is attempting.

I'd also love to stop purchasing tubes with tire changes.
 

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Wow that's some bad luck. Must be the highway I guess with those kinds of miles I try my best never to get on the highway whenever possible.
Locations include Florida, Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Wisconsin. Whatever bike / tire type you ride you need to think ahead as to how you will deal with a flat. I had a chain fail in British Columbia more than 100 miles from nearest cell tower and over 300 miles from a shop that had a chain or even a connecting link. Had a link and tools. Fixed it and continued on road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You have been lucky. I’ve had 5 which works out to one every 35,000 miles. This includes one on my 300X with 33,000 miles on it. I have also helped 4 other fellow riders fix one on the road. This is much more than on 4 wheels. Put 517,000 miles on my Honda truck with one flat.
Fuzzy thanks for that input, that's exactly why I wanted to go ahead with this conversion. If you plan on running pavement would not recommend, but any real adventure you should.
 

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To add to the subject today I helped a Harley rider with a mail in his rear tire. I had ride on and a compressor. Ride on slowed the leak enough for him to go 30 miles home. Without my help he was waiting on the side of the road for a tow truck on rural Kentucky back road. He had tube tires.
 

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Remind me to carry a set of irons and a spare tube around you fuzzy you must be like a human magnet attracting all that metal haha.
 

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Remind me to carry a set of irons and a spare tube around you fuzzy you must be like a human magnet attracting all that metal haha.
I was on a group ride. (Harley rider not part of group, just came across him in a parking lot looking at his flat tire). We compared notes on the subject and my 35,000 miles between flats was close to experience of others in the group. We don’t ride major highways and seldom off pavement but twisty backroads like we and the Harley rider were in yesterday. His flat happens on KY160 known as the Dragon Slayer.

spen a little time over on ADV and read all the flat tire experience. If you think I’m unique your wrong.
 

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I got originally the idea of using goop from here:


ps. Bal, there is no need to put so much goop. around the spokes is enough. sometime less is working better than more. The guy in the links explained it really well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I got originally the idea of using goop from here:


ps. Bal, there is no need to put so much goop. around the spokes is enough. sometime less is working better than more. The guy in the links explained it really well.
Kris I did see alot of vids before working on mine and they used little goop, but it just did not work on mine until I added the amount you see in the pics I posted.
 

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When I did the wheels on my '04 KLR650, then wrote it up - I 'tuned' my spokes FIRST, then 'gooped' the spokes. I used quite a lot of 'goop', my thinking being that IF I had to tighten a spoke later, the large 'wad' of goop would STILL seal things.


http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DSN_KLR650/photos/album/138585568/pic/list

 
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