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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I picked up my 2015 V650 a few weeks ago, the PO had the side cases installed with the high ends of the cases installed to the front of the bike, as in the first photo. The more I looked at them this way, the more they reminded me of the western shows I watched on tv as a kid in the 50's, when the gunslingers had their pistols in the holsters with the grips pointed forward so they would draw cross body-yes, I realize I'm aging myself.
I wondered what it would be like to swap the cases left to right-or if it was even possible. I googled for images and found someone (an owner) who had swapped the cases, so I checked, and yes, they are not labeled left or right, and yes each case will fit on either side of the bike. I tried them 'swapped', as in the second photo and took a few steps back, and I cannot decide which way they should go. One way they go with the slope of the seat, and the other way they go with the slope of the bodywork.
So the question remains, is there a right or wrong way to install them? Just sitting back with a beer waiting to see what you all say...
Wheel Tire Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive lighting
Wheel Tire Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive fuel system
 

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When I picked up my 2015 V650 a few weeks ago, the PO had the side cases installed with the high ends of the cases installed to the front of the bike, as in the first photo. The more I looked at them this way, the more they reminded me of the western shows I watched on tv as a kid in the 50's, when the gunslingers had their pistols in the holsters with the grips pointed forward so they would draw cross body-yes, I realize I'm aging myself.
I wondered what it would be like to swap the cases left to right-or if it was even possible. I googled for images and found someone (an owner) who had swapped the cases, so I checked, and yes, they are not labeled left or right, and yes each case will fit on either side of the bike. I tried them 'swapped', as in the second photo and took a few steps back, and I cannot decide which way they should go. One way they go with the slope of the seat, and the other way they go with the slope of the bodywork.
So the question remains, is there a right or wrong way to install them? Just sitting back with a beer waiting to see what you all say... View attachment 191542 View attachment 191543

If you carry a passenger, the second way.

Otherwise, whichever way you find more visually appealing. Or one one way and the other the opposite way and see who notices.

If you ride the same route often you can experiment with fuel economy to see if there is an aerodynamic difference.
 

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2017 Kawasaki Versys-x 300 (non ABS)
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If you carry a passenger, the second way.

Otherwise, whichever way you find more visually appealing. Or one one way and the other the opposite way and see who notices.

If you ride the same route often you can experiment with fuel economy to see if there is an aerodynamic difference.
Exactly what he said. Low/short end forward if you carry a passenger. Much easier for my wife to get on the bike that way.

Happy riding!

JT
 

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I've used the same set of Givi E22 Mono-Key cases for years, interchangeably on both my V-Strom 650, and the Versys-X 300. Regarding aerodynamics, if you compared their profile (roughly) to the shape of a raindrop, which way does a raindrop fall? The fat end first, the "trailing" end is the skinny part.
I've tried them both ways, and I prefer their looks with the larger end forward.

I pretty much ride solo these days, but I can see the point of reversing them to make it easier for a passenger.

FYI, here is the only stock photo of these cases from Givi, but it shows them with the large end facing forward, on a Ducati Scrambler:
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire


Here are photos of my (now departed) V-Strom, and the Versys:
Cloud Tire Sky Wheel Vehicle

Tire Wheel Plant Vehicle Fuel tank


FYI, the little "Givi" logo on the sides got knocked off in various scrapes/tip-overs, long ago, but I don't think their placement was any kind of indicator as to the direction that the cases should face.
Just, whatever looks best to the owner!

(LOL, if you'd bought a pair of E-21 cases, we wouldn't be having this conversation! ;) )
 

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At sub-sonic speeds there is no aerodynamic difference. Except in terms of interference or preconditioning, meaning do they tend to direct air towards or away from other areas that are high or low drag? The spinning rear wheel is high drag, and the area around the license plate would tend to be turbulent. Proper air redirection could reduce drag, and I would guess the tall end forward would be better.

Keep in mind your legs are in front of the luggage, slowing the air hitting the front of the box.

But I would also guess it is inconsequential in terms of mpg which way you mount the boxes. Unless you're racing or doing sustained cruise at maximum possible speed.
 

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We had this discussion here a few years ago. Do whatever looks better to you. When I had E-22s on mine, I preferred them this direction.

 

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For me, the science is the juice. The Underlying Form of a design should be guided by that. Has to be based on what's the most efficient for it to appeal to me. Kind of like Biomimicry where we humans copy some crazy looking feature of an animal because it turns out nature had the right design for the job and it doesn't look weird anymore. In this case the drag coefficient so the top surface tilting downwards into the wind. But each their own. I like the look of the Versys 650 gen 3 but Im not sure that the "face" is based in science!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great discussion, even better than I expected. I tend to favor function over form, so I plan on leaving the side cases with the low end of the covers forward to (hopefully) reduce the chance of scuffing them with my boot getting on or off the bike.

Also, I was wrong when I referred to them as Monolock cases. I have since learned all GIVI side cases are Monokey. The Monolock system is reserved for top boxes for small cycles and scooters.
 

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If I remember correctly, the ideal shape aerodynamically is the tear drop with the big end forward. If you look at an airplane wing the fat end is forward. Of course you can put the small end forward so that at speed it would give you down force on the rear wheel for increased traction.
 
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The drag of the case in isolation will be the same in either direction at subsonic speeds, at least as a good approximation. The wake is the primary component of blunt body drag, so the taller end at the back causes a larger wake (think suction) and thus greater drag. There is some drag at the front of the blunt body as air hits it.

Picture a flat plate in the wind. Air hits the front like the blunt bow of a boat in water. Behind the flat plate is turbulent low pressure, "suction". Now picture a cone, like an Apollo space capsule. At subsonic speeds it is lower drag blunt end forward rather than pointy end forward because of the "suction" behind it with the pointy end forward.

But we are at seriously subsonic speeds, so the difference in direction is very small.

The cases, though, are attached to the bike which also has a rider on it. As a system, the back of the bike has a large turbulent "suction". Reducing it will reduce drag. Tapering the back end helps, which means short end of luggage at the back. How the rider affects the airflow will play into it.

But, at normal highway speeds I don't believe the difference in mpg would be measurable. A small change to the windshield or rider position is likely to make a much bigger difference.
 

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The drag of the case in isolation will be the same in either direction at subsonic speeds, at least as a good approximation. The wake is the primary component of blunt body drag, so the taller end at the back causes a larger wake (think suction) and thus greater drag. There is some drag at the front of the blunt body as air hits it.

Picture a flat plate in the wind. Air hits the front like the blunt bow of a boat in water. Behind the flat plate is turbulent low pressure, "suction". Now picture a cone, like an Apollo space capsule. At subsonic speeds it is lower drag blunt end forward rather than pointy end forward because of the "suction" behind it with the pointy end forward.

But we are at seriously subsonic speeds, so the difference in direction is very small.

The cases, though, are attached to the bike which also has a rider on it. As a system, the back of the bike has a large turbulent "suction". Reducing it will reduce drag. Tapering the back end helps, which means short end of luggage at the back. How the rider affects the airflow will play into it.

But, at normal highway speeds I don't believe the difference in mpg would be measurable. A small change to the windshield or rider position is likely to make a much bigger difference.
Like my V-Nose Trailer. I tell people it is just for extra storage and interior length. I would need to add those flaps behind the trailer like seen on some semi-trailers to help a little at highway speeds. I get the same MPG whether I am pulling the trailer empty or with 1000 lbs of bikes and gear aboard.
 

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Im over my head here but I was thinking like this?
View attachment 191607
From the pointy top of the roof to the back is all detached turbulent flow, which is very high drag. Behind the vertical rear end there is an area of high suction, also very high drag. That isn't a fast design!

If you picture the cross section of a wing on a slow airplane, the leading edge is rounded and a bit fat, whereas the trailing edge is quite thin and sharp. The thickest part of the wing is pretty far forward. The idea is to keep the air adhered to the surface, moving smoothly. When this happens the largest portion of drag is friction. The air flows smoothly over the wing and off of the sharp trailing edge with negligible turbulence. (When the wing is developing lift, the air off the trailing edge is moving downwards, which contributes drag as a function of creating lift).

Race cars have a large rear wing to get massive downforce on the rear wheels in order to get better traction. It causes drag but the traction is worth it. If you ignore the wing and look at the rest of the rear end you'll see they work hard to create smooth flow around the rear end without turbulence or suction.
 

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If I remember correctly, the ideal shape aerodynamically is the tear drop with the big end forward. If you look at an airplane wing the fat end is forward. Of course you can put the small end forward so that at speed it would give you down force on the rear wheel for increased traction.
Don't know about you guys but I was just trying to be funny. Have fun!
 

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If I remember correctly, the ideal shape aerodynamically is the tear drop with the big end forward. If you look at an airplane wing the fat end is forward. Of course you can put the small end forward so that at speed it would give you down force on the rear wheel for increased traction.
Ha ha, yea kind of like putting a rear trunk lid spoiler on a Honda Civic. :ROFLMAO: Soooo much more traction!
 

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9-year veteran of the Air Force (F-111 crew chief) weighing in. The purpose of the curved/teardrop cross-section of the leading edge of an aircraft wing is to create lift via the Bernoulli Principle, which holds that faster moving air creates less pressure than slower moving air. The air traveling over the curved wing surface moves faster than the air flowing over the flatter surface beneath, creating lift as the higher-pressure air pushes the wing upwards. The standard quickie way to illustrate this is to exhale forcefully between two suspended parallel sheets of paper, which will suck together as a result. #TheMoreYouKnow :^)
 
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