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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today I fainally got the courage needed to perform the procedure that service would not do. They do not wish to temper with the TPS because the service manual strictly says that it has been perfectly adjusted at the factory.
But, as I was crazy with the engine stuttering after decelerating and riding at idle throttle and than accelerating, after the vacuum mod and the airbox pipes shortening, I proceeded with the TPS adjustment.
I wasn't concerned about the warranty because I don't give a damn about it anymore - simply I started to hate my bike. I was very well considering selling it today. After some trouble with the unscrewing the TPS screw i started the bike and started playing with the TPS position. Like someone told at the forum, i turned the TPS counterclockwise and the engine started to rev a bit more at idle. After giving it full throttle it didn't pop out that much like before. I turned the TPS just a bit more than a millimeter and tightened it back. I took the bike for a test ride and it seemed to have a bit more power at the low and mid rev range. It also came up to 10000 revs more quickly. I will ride it with this setting for a few days to check engine behavior and to test the fuel consumption. I will get back to the forum with the results in a few days.

P.S. do not try to unscrew the TPS screw if you do not have a tight torx screwdriver because you can easily damage the screw! do not try to turn the TPS clockwise because the engine starts to pop immediately.

P.P.S. sorry if i made some typing mistakes, i do not have time to spell check the text.
 

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My TPS output voltage was a bit low, and I adjusted it by rotating it counterclockwise to increase output voltage. This adds fuel and increases ignition timing advance from idle to mid throttle openings. I then just had to back off the secondary throttle sensor to maximum counterclockwise position (it was already close), to reduce cold fast idle back to normal. Warmed up idle should be set to 1300 rpm.
 

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When I rode my bike for 3 weeks on the California coast, it had an abrupt closed-open transition, in addition to a frequent backfire. It also started to idle like a Harley, whereupon I knew I had to do something. Rotated the TPS counter-clockwise barely a mm, which solved the problem. When I came back to my home elevation of 6,200 ft, it ran sluggish and felt rich at full throttle, so I adjusted back to the specified voltage. It has none of the backfire, etc. problems at this elevation at the stock position. I have no other engine mods.
I highly recomment the factory TPS adapter to check voltage. It's pretty cheap from the dealer, and will prevent you from breaking TPS pins or shorting it out. If you damage the TPS, you will have to buy the whole throttle body--TPS is not sold seperately!
Interestingly, as opposed to Invader's bike, my fast idle didn't increase at all with adjustment, and I didn't have to touch the secondary.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
idle engine speed reved up just a little bit, and the cold engine start sound easier. it revs up to 2000 cold, and warmed up idle is at about 1200-1300 rpm. i did not tempered with the subthrottle sensor yet, and if the fuel consuption is right i will not adjust it.
the vacuum mod stays at the bike - i love the impact on less deceleration while engine braking
 

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Hmm - this sounds interesting. I too have the symtpons you talk about bad_ri.

I am unfamiliar with this. I see your picture of the TPS sensor. Here you just simply unscrewed it, and moved it counterclockwise about a mm?

What does the subthrottle sensor do? (if it is moved)
 

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All my similar problems went away when I installed the PC-V and autotune. The fuel map is richened up enough to eliminate the notchy throttle and it smooths out the throttle response completely.
 

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The T25 torx fit mine better, the 27 was slightly too large to go in. The 25 felt a bit loose but turned the screw without slipping.

The Dynojet route is the real solution to all fuel mapping shortcomings, obviously.
TPS adjustment is free, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Hmm - this sounds interesting. I too have the symtpons you talk about bad_ri.

I am unfamiliar with this. I see your picture of the TPS sensor. Here you just simply unscrewed it, and moved it counterclockwise about a mm?

What does the subthrottle sensor do? (if it is moved)
t25 was slipping so i used t27 thorax and a slight gentle push with a light hammer to get it in the screw.

i just didn't move the subthrottle yet because i want to check out the fuel consuption and the engine behavior like this.
the tps sensor was moved just over a milimeter and it was enough to make engine throttle response whole a lot better. it dose not surge anymore, does not pop, cough, stutter.... seems to me that it has a bit more power in low revs. i can cruise around the town in 6th gear at a speed of 60km/h and still get decent acceleration in 6th gear.


and i didn't wast to spend any money extra because i have paid a lot already for extra stuff on my bike - that's the reason i don't want the power commander or something like that. i bought a brand new bike that worked perfectly the first 3000km. then it starded stuttering and after 12000km the service didn't want to temper with the tps, so i did it myself. now the bike is throttle resposive like it was the first day.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
When I rode my bike for 3 weeks on the California coast, it had an abrupt closed-open transition, in addition to a frequent backfire. It also started to idle like a Harley, whereupon I knew I had to do something. Rotated the TPS counter-clockwise barely a mm, which solved the problem. When I came back to my home elevation of 6,200 ft, it ran sluggish and felt rich at full throttle, so I adjusted back to the specified voltage. It has none of the backfire, etc. problems at this elevation at the stock position. I have no other engine mods.
I highly recomment the factory TPS adapter to check voltage. It's pretty cheap from the dealer, and will prevent you from breaking TPS pins or shorting it out. If you damage the TPS, you will have to buy the whole throttle body--TPS is not sold seperately!
Interestingly, as opposed to Invader's bike, my fast idle didn't increase at all with adjustment, and I didn't have to touch the secondary.
we cannot buy the harness connector - it is not sold as a spare part or anything else in my country (or anywhere in europe i suppose)
the problem you got with elevation at 6200ft won't have the effect on european models because we have a O2 sensor in the exhaust which helps the ECU to figure out how much fuel to add in the air/fuel mixture.
 

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Kawasaki part # 57001-1538 throttle sensor harness connector should be available from your dealer. $15.96 from http://www.cheapcycleparts.com/Street.aspx I made my own adapter with some 0.032" solid wire and modified flat female connectors.

The throttle sensors can be removed. They're just not available seperately from Kawasaki. The number on the main throttle sensor can't be read without removing it. http://www.keihin-corp.co.jp/english/products/4wheel/index.shtml

Invisabiker had tried tuning the main throttle sensor by ear like Airlock99 of UK Versys forum did, by finding the best response at 2800 rpm where it used to stumble. With his significant adjustment, he had to back off the secondary sensor to bring fast idle down from 4000 rpm. http://www.versys.co.uk/index.php?option=com_smf&Itemid=45&topic=4157.msg47678#msg47678

My main throttle sensor output voltage was a bit low... Before starting engine and with ignition on, check main throttle sensor input voltage and maximum output voltage. Input voltage can vary, which affects output voltage reading. Mine was either 4.76 V or 4.99 V (spec: 4.75~5.25 V). With input at 4.99 V, I set maximum throttle output to 4.22 V (spec: 4.2~4.4 V) by turning main throttle sensor counterclockwise, to have idle position setting at 1.031 V, and within standard 1.005~1.035 V (after engine is warmed up, with idle set at 1300 rpm). This gave me a 4.04 V output at max throttle with an input of 4.76 V... My main throttle sensor was rotated very slightly, judging from the green marking dot on the front of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Sorry, bad_ri... You can completely remove your post if you like, by clicking on 'Edit', 'Delete', then select 'Delete Message' in 'Deletion Options'.
ok - i was in a hurry, didn't see the option... it doesn't matter, let it stay, it's nice to chit-chat a bit.
 

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ok - i was in a hurry, didn't see the option... it doesn't matter, let it stay, it's nice to chit-chat a bit.
:) Yes it is, buddy...


What does the subthrottle sensor do? (if it is moved)
As mentioned in post #3, rotating it counterclockwise adds fuel and increases ignition timing advance at low to mid throttle openings... My main throttle sensor was rotated counterclockwise by almost half a millimeter only to have output voltage within spec. It's still very nearly centered with the green reference mark in front of it. This was enough to cure the lean stumble and exhaust pop at around 2800 rpm.
 

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Invisabiker had tried tuning the main throttle sensor by ear like Airlock99 of UK Versys forum did, by finding the best response at 2800 rpm where it used to stumble. With his significant adjustment, he had to back off the secondary sensor to bring fast idle down from 4000 rpm. http://www.versys.co.uk/index.php?option=com_smf&Itemid=45&topic=4157.msg47678#msg47678

My main throttle sensor output voltage was a bit low... Before starting engine and with ignition on, check main throttle sensor input voltage and maximum output voltage. Input voltage can vary, which affects output voltage reading. Mine was either 4.76 V or 4.99 V (spec: 4.75~5.25 V). With input at 4.99 V, I set maximum throttle output to 4.22 V (spec: 4.2~4.4 V) by turning main throttle sensor counterclockwise, to have idle position setting at 1.031 V, and within standard 1.005~1.035 V (after engine is warmed up, with idle set at 1300 rpm). This gave me a 4.04 V output at max throttle with an input of 4.76 V... My main throttle sensor was rotated very slightly, judging from the green marking dot on the front of it.
Dude - this is exactly what was going on with me, 2800 stumble, http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4758

Thanks for another link on the story, I am going to do this Saturday :thumb:
 

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:clap: Just have a good look at that green reference mark in from of main (lower) throttle sensor first, and note which angle you're viewing it from to have part of the mark on TPS centered with other part of the mark on TB. Crack the torx screw loose and give it as little counterclock rotation as possible, so that's it's hard to see any shift in at at all, tighten screw then try it out. You can then rotate secondary (upper) throttle sensor also counterclockwise to reduce cold fast idle rpm. Mine was already close to maximum counterclockwise position. It's now rotated as far as it can go, and my fast idle is at 2000 rpm. :thumb:
 
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