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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This thread should probably be a sticky. I've probably missed a few things. I'm posting this thread mainly for those who have not yet attempted to work on their bike. Posting here to help people avoid having to hunt for this info. Some is obvious but posting anyway.

Mandatory tools required for motorcycle ownership
  • obtain a service manual, not to be confused with owners manual, for your bike, downloadable in PDF form from this site or available from other members. For the uninitiated it tells you what to do and how to do it like a recipe book as well as providing settings and other technical information
  • watch as many YouTube how to videos that you can tolerate on a maintenance subject that interests you.
  • cable lube tool or other DIY alternative
  • 3/8 inch head Metric socket set with 1/2 head adapters, reach extenders, etc.
  • 1/2 inch head "extra long" socket bar (provides extra leverage over and above what shorter handled socket handle can provide to help remove tight bolts and do other tasks that require extra force on a socket) (aka breaker bar or telescoping socket handle)
  • Metric Allan keys (preferably T handle, or L shape and not fold out as they are easier to work with)
  • 27mm socket to remove or loosen rear axle (too large to be part of standard socket set)
  • chain brush to clean chain
  • Phillips (+ head) and slot (- head) screw drivers in small and medium sizes
  • rear spool type pit stand to hold bike upright and elevated for cleaning and service. Also needed are 8mm (for 2015 or later 650 model bikes) or 10mm (for 2007-2014 650 model bikes) swing arm spools (cheap on eBay)
  • needle nose pliers
  • oil filter wrench
  • razor blade/box opener
  • vice grips
  • retrieval magnet
  • metric wrench set
Tools for electrical work
  • digital VOM meter
  • high wattage soldering iron
  • wire stripper, not to be confused with wire cutter (see picture)
  • razor blade/box opener or wire cutter
  • quality electrical tape
  • 12V battery charger
Supplies
  • kerosene or diesel fuel in spray bottle for chain cleaning OR WD40. DO NOT clean chain with harsh solvents like gasoline or brake cleaner as it will destroy rubber O rings that seal in grease and shorten life of chain.
  • blue loctite, to keep bolts from vibrating loose
  • shop towels
  • oil/fluid collection pan, funnel, oil filter wrench, old laundry detergent bottles or similar for old fluid collection
  • tub of general purpose grease
  • chain lube - dry type (non fling off) such as Motul, Dupont Chain Saver, etc. makes less mess
  • WD-40
  • grease/dirt removing solvent like brake cleaner (do not use solvent on chain)
  • water based degreasers should be avoided UNLESS they are non corrosive/aluminum safe, check label before using
Optional
  • front triple tree lift stand (with (27mm ????) adapter for Versys to elevate front wheel
  • 14mm Allan key to remove front axle
  • propane torch to warm bolts with loctite on them or get your bent part red hot before hammering it back into shape
  • heat gun to warm bolts to melt loctite and allow removal and remove stickers. also handy with heat shrink tubing
  • torque wrench
  • strap on LED head light / work light - the kind that looks goofy and straps to your forehead
 

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+magnet

(I like to take off a speaker's toroidal magnet from a trashed tv or radio or else)
It's to magnetize your allen keys or screwdrivers momentarily, and perhaps hover the ground to find that elusive bolt or nut...

it also minimizes the rattling in the toolbox as all sockets and bits are held in place.
 

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8mm Allen for use in between the chain and sprocket when re-tightening the axle nut after adjusting the chain.

Cheap calipers to measure chain slack. You can get a digital one from Harbor Freight for $20 that will measure in MM and SAE. Pro tip if you are on the paddock stand 38mm slack will hit you just about 30mm when it is on the side stand as it should be measured per the factory spec. Will also allow you to find the tight spot in your chain because you can rotate the tire freely.
 

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Tools for Valve shim/ vacuum sync

I borrowed this post from my How To thread.

Tools that you should have; telescopic swivel magnet( one that you can fix the final angle of the magnet), something to pickup a small watch or hearing aid battery as that is about the size of the shim.

A breaker bar, this is used to hold the crankshaft in the exact position.


Carbide 200 to 300 grit sand paper.A precision micrometer, best go with digital unless you are familiar using a precision one that measures to 0.0001 mm. A inch pound torque wrench 1/4 inch drive.



If you are working on a MK-3 a set of obstruction wrenches / S wrenches for the cam chain tensioner ( 12 mm either S or Half moon box).


Feeler gauges Go / No Go , as in the photo.



For a 2015 the air box has a single allenhead cap screw fastening both throttle bodies to the airbox, a long 3mm allen wrench makes it easy to remove.


For those wondering, that small piece of wood was my door passage set template for holesawing, I drilled a 5/16 by 0.125 depth hole on the center of the narrow side, this became my sanding block were I placed on top of my shim , better than sanding my fingernails, and easier.


I copied from another thread;What you'll need:
  • A sheet of paper listing the individual exhaust valve measurement and individual intake measurements, also have a spot for the shim measurement as measured when removed , you then either subtract or add what you need to reach spec, by listing the final measurement of the shim, you have a future reference , last would be the final shim measurement for each valve ,after you torqued everything and installed the cam chain tensioner.
    Or You can print the PDF at the bottom of the page.
  • telescopic magnet
  • inch pound torque wrench
  • 12 mm obstruction / half moon wrench if this is a 2015 650ABS for the cam chain tensioner
  • 1/2 inch breaker bar
  • small piece of 2X4 , drill a shallow 0.125 " hole 5/16 or 19/64 in diameter, on the 1 1/2 inch side, this is used as a sanding block for the shim , easier than trying to hold the shim with your fingers, unless you need your finger nails sanded too
  • a second piece of wood or other flat surface to place the carbide paper on, for sanding
  • A good metric socket set
  • Metric wrench set
  • Metric allen wrench set
  • Assembly Lube
  • Loctite
  • Anti-Seize
  • Rags
  • Assembly Lube
  • Metric Feeler Gauges, my preference is Go No Go
  • Zip Ties
  • Metric Micrometer
  • Shim kit or sandpaper
  • Manometer for performing throttle body vacuum sync

 

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I would suggest that you buy a set of JIS bits, rather than using a Philips which does NOT properly fit.
I'll second that. JIS bits are light years ahead of Philips. Just ask your frequently removed Philips head screws and they'll tell you. :wink2:
 

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what about tools you always keep under your seat/on the bike ?!?!?
I carry a 12v compressor c/w tubeless repair bits (SLIME?), and a spare clutch cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As others have mentioned a 12v or other air compressor is pretty much essential. I use a 12v unit I purchased with a built in pressure gauge of of Amazon. The reason is that motorcycle tires do not seem to maintain pressure like car tires and having the EXACT pressure makes a big difference in handling. Too much and the bike feels skittish cornering hard and harsh over bumps and too little and it feels imprecise. I always seem to loose a few psi every week, not sure why. If your not topping off your tires on a weekly basis the tires are probably low and wearing faster than they should.
 

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Based on the list of tools, you guys are good a open to a professional service center for the Versys's.:wink2:

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've never taken a motorcycle to a service center for maintenance in 10 years and I'm not a genius. Motorcycle maintenance is relatively easy with a service manual as a guide and the advice of a forum like this. Investing in tools is a lot cheaper than paying someone to maintain your bike and you'll be sure things get done right.
 

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I've never taken a motorcycle to a service center for maintenance in 10 years and I'm not a genius. Motorcycle maintenance is relatively easy with a service manual as a guide and the advice of a forum like this. Investing in tools is a lot cheaper than paying someone to maintain your bike and you'll be sure things get done right.
WELL SAID SIR:right:
 
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