Kawasaki Versys Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently replaced my stock tyres to Michelin Anakee Adventure and the guy at the shop told me to have them at 34psi front 36psi rear for road use. For 2 year i was using 28psi front 32psi back as the manual says. What tyre pressure are you using and what is your opinion?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,919 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,451 Posts
Kawi pressure recommendations are generic. You may or may not do better with something different.

A rule of thumb is look for ~10% pressure rise when the tire warms up. Too low pressure will cause more temperature rise, and too hard will be a lower rise. That 10% is nothing scientific, but seems to be a generally accepted number based on widespread experience.

Too high will cause fast wear of the center of the tread, whereas low pressure can cause sidewall wear or cupping.

Your tire pressure gauge is not calibrated, so it could easily be 2psi wrong. Add in your riding style and how much weight loaded on your bike, and the variables get even messier.

Check the tire manufacturer's website to get another datapoint.

Shop mechanics have zero authority to advise something different than the bike or tire makers unless they can provide you with the basis for their advise.

I would start with the Kawi numbers and test ride it. Measure cold and hot pressures. Then bump up the pressure towards the higher end of the allowable range and test ride it again. Then try some pressures in between. You'll find a range where the feel is best, and where the temp rise is ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Use what feels good to YOU, not by someone else's recommendation. I know many riders that SWEAR by low 30's with the rear about +2 psi over the front. Through trial and error, with the specific tires that I use, I find that 35F and 38R feel best for ME.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
I go by what the manual says. And Michelin, Bridgestone, and Dunlop (and probably others) say for their tires, to use the pressure specified in the vehicle owners manual. So I figure Kawasaki, Michelin, Bridgestone, and Dunlop can't all be wrong. Now if you're running off road tires, and riding off road, then you'll need to go lower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
on my V650 I use this - no extra load than 33 front , rear 36 (manual say that). If I have about 30 kg load with me that 33 front and 39 rear. if is 50+kg load with me than 33 front and 42 rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I recently replaced my stock tyres to Michelin Anakee Adventure and the guy at the shop told me to have them at 34psi front 36psi rear for road use. For 2 year i was using 28psi front 32psi back as the manual says. What tyre pressure are you using and what is your opinion?
33f, 36r. I found the front just a tiny bit less stable during more aggressive riding in the mountains at 32.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I recently replaced my stock tyres to Michelin Anakee Adventure and the guy at the shop told me to have them at 34psi front 36psi rear for road use. For 2 year i was using 28psi front 32psi back as the manual says. What tyre pressure are you using and what is your opinion?
I run 28/34. Manual for Versys 2015 says 32/36 for Dunlop Sportmax or Pirelli Scorpion. I've always believed the standard setting is for ALL scenarios: cold, wet, pillion etc. And that it usually means the tyres feel very unresponsive and not optimal. I've found 28/34 fine and I get 16,000m from Michelins. 34/36 is going to feel like running on rocks and your cornering could be compromised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I recently replaced my stock tyres to Michelin Anakee Adventure and the guy at the shop told me to have them at 34psi front 36psi rear for road use. For 2 year i was using 28psi front 32psi back as the manual says. What tyre pressure are you using and what is your opinion?
I presume that the 300 is substantially lighter than the 650 so the pressures the manual says sounds good to me.

Also woheba, power output particularly while cornering can distort the back tyre too much
if the presure is too low... more power plus more weight = the need for higher pressure in
the rear tyre I reckon.

99.9% of the time I stick with the book pressure on all my bikes and it works for me...
especially for my Gen ll V650; it steers really well (on Michy Road4 front, Road5 back...
Cornering, I can get on the power real early and hard for fast exits with the standard pressures.
I live in Australia... so you need to think about different road surface temperatures too.

*If you know you're going to be hitting hard edges like rocks, gutters, etc at speed
extra psi will help protect the rims. Don't go above the manufacturers maximum recommendation of course.
Or reduce pressure for soft sand/sloppy mud.

Bottom line; unless there's extenuating* circumstances use the book pressures imho.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Traxxion Dynamics, a manufacturer of aftermarket Goldwing suspension parts, has a great utube on tire pressure. Although it is geared towards the Goldwing, the principle is universal. Basically, the tire has to have enough air in it to have a sufficiently stiff sidewall, but no more. The tire has greater contact area when the tire is not over inflated, and rides a lot better. He suggests a reduction in tire pressure on the Goldwing; 4 PSI less. Don't automatically believe more pressure is better.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Poldark

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
I run a couple of extra pounds over what the owners manual says, sometimes a little more depending on the bike, I alway have with most of my bikes. The manufacturers are usually a little conversative for liability reasons. You'll find most street bikes handle better with a little more pressure. Off road use, a little less pressure. As far as the Goldwings, I've had two over the last dozen years. Here's a buddy of mine and myself in the Smoky Mountains, we both run higher pressures. He's on his Goldwing, I'm on the Triumph Trophy, the bike shooting the video. About halfway through the video, after the tires were warm, we start pushing it. That blue Goldwing was his 5th or 6th one that he had owned, he could run the wheels off those bikes and I had a hard time at times keeping up.

 

·
Registered
2019 Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE
Joined
·
72 Posts
I run a couple of extra pounds over what the owners manual says, sometimes a little more depending on the bike, I alway have with most of my bikes. The manufacturers are usually a little conversative for liability reasons. You'll find most street bikes handle better with a little more pressure. Off road use, a little less pressure. As far as the Goldwings, I've had two over the last dozen years. Here's a buddy of mine and myself in the Smoky Mountains, we both run higher pressures. He's on his Goldwing, I'm on the Triumph Trophy, the bike shooting the video. About halfway through the video, after the tires were warm, we start pushing it. That blue Goldwing was his 5th or 6th one that he had owned, he could run the wheels off those bikes and I had a hard time at times keeping up.

Awesome clip, loved it (y)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,919 Posts
Here's a link to a thread on changing tube-type wheels to tubeless. Worked VERY WELL for me!

:cool:

 

·
Registered
Vx300 Don’t fear the Revs!
Joined
·
390 Posts
I recently replaced my stock tyres to Michelin Anakee Adventure and the guy at the shop told me to have them at 34psi front 36psi rear for road use. For 2 year i was using 28psi front 32psi back as the manual says. What tyre pressure are you using and what is your opinion?
How u liking the anakee adventure tires? I’m about due and have been eyeballing them
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,919 Posts
I have run 36psiF, 42psiR in ALL my motorcycle tires (knobbies as well!) since September 2008, and have ridden OVER 160,000 miles since then, at THOSE pressures.

(y)(y)

:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
Put a set of Michelin Road 5's on 4.5k mi. ago. Kept them right on 36/33. They are wearing badly on the cornering surfaces but the center is wearing a lot less. I only ride mountains no freeway or highway at all. It is changing my turn in to be a lot more abrupt. Suggestions?
 

·
Registered
2019 Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE
Joined
·
72 Posts
Put a set of Michelin Road 5's on 4.5k mi. ago. Kept them right on 36/33. They are wearing badly on the cornering surfaces but the center is wearing a lot less. I only ride mountains no freeway or highway at all. It is changing my turn in to be a lot more abrupt. Suggestions?
The road 5's are a are a duel compound tyre/tire, so they will appear to wear badly on the outer edges if riding a little spiritedly :whistle: but clean up when you're not too severe on the throttle.
I usually get around 12,000 K's/7,500 miles out of a rear on my V1K. I've also heard and seen Angel GT's are good in both grip and mileage.
This pic is of pilot road 4's I think but it's how my road 5's look if I'm pushing it.

181240
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top