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Discussion Starter #1
Saw this one posted here and there.

Without question the best chain lube performance testing I have seen.

Might even cause a few to reconsider their chain maintenance protocol.

 

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Unfortunately, it has quite unfair tests.

In particular, a chain wax will certainly fling off (like he did) if you don't let it dry. It's designed to penetrate on application.
Once dry, chain wax beats by far any liquid lubes essentially because it turns into a kind of grease.

I use chain wax for many things, from door hinges to caliper sliding pins.
 

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Once dry, chain wax beats by far any liquid lubes essentially because it turns into a kind of grease.
I used chain wax for years but ultimately it did not prevent surface rust on the side plates of my chain, plus it always 'looked' dry.

I have gone back to the tried-and-true 80-90w gear oil. The same lube the manual says to use, as do every manufacturer's manual I've seen. Yes, it is a bit messy but it works well and is cheap to use. I don't worry about a bit of oil flung onto the wheel rim- a quick wipe with a rag and WD-40 will clean it off if one is anal about having a clean machine. I'm not: I'm more concerned with mechanical fitness than appearance.

And, Ed, please don't get started on WD-40 as a chain lube- I've tried it and am not interested, thanks.
 

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I used chain wax for years but ultimately it did not prevent surface rust on the side plates of my chain, plus it always 'looked' dry.
That's because you didn't wipe the chain with a rag after application to uniformly coat a shiny chain.
Besides, I've never had a single sign of rust on plates for any of the 10 chains I've owned and replaced.
Perhaps you don't put enough.

I'm using a cardboard between the muffler and chain to catch the mist. This board shows well the consistency and effectiveness of the chain wax.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think the primary take away from this test is the nature of how "O" and "X" rings work on your chain. They do not require lubrication and if they ever do it's because they are worn out. Worn out rings allow the grease on the pins to escape then in short order your chain is reduced to toast.

In the video he identifies the actual role of chain lube: Corrosion prevention and lubrication of the center rollers. Neither of these two will be the culprit that kills your chain. Stretch and frozen pins will deal it the fatal blow.
 

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If I replaced a chain because of a torn ring or kink, they would have lasted 10`000km or less...!!

I trust ONLY how long the links stretched (side play, uneven stretch and rear sprocket slack)

my stats:
road: around 26-32 thousands km
offroad: around 20-24 thousands km.
 

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totally agree with the chain wax theory. I use it and love it. It even smells good when you get a slight mist on the muffler... I also use it on my bicycle chain, extending the live considerably. Good video from Fortnine, even though I don't always agree 100% with all the conclusions. Cheers!
 

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I stopped using special chain oils several years ago. I buy the cheapest walmart auto transmission oil ($3.99) and use a brash to cover my chain with it every 500 miles. It's been 15k miles and the chain didn't need even an adjustment.
 

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That's because you didn't wipe the chain with a rag after application to uniformly coat a shiny chain.

I'm using cardboard between the muffler and chain to catch the mist. This board shows well the consistency and effectiveness of the chain wax.
Where did I say that I didn't wipe it after applying?
 

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New to the group, and I see a fair amount of posts about chains, wear, oiling, replacing etc... How does one know if a chain is in need of replacement? Is there a standard test or method used to determine this? I bought an 08 a few months ago with 12k on it but I have no idea of its history. I've done oil, battery, stator but nothing else yet.

TIA
 

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New to the group, and I see a fair amount of posts about chains, wear, oiling, replacing etc... How does one know if a chain is in need of replacement? Is there a standard test or method used to determine this? I bought an 08 a few months ago with 12k on it but I have no idea of its history. I've done oil, battery, stator but nothing else yet.

TIA


The factory service manual has a section for the driveline. It includes inspections and servicing.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
New to the group, and I see a fair amount of posts about chains, wear, oiling, replacing etc... How does one know if a chain is in need of replacement? Is there a standard test or method used to determine this? I bought an 08 a few months ago with 12k on it but I have no idea of its history. I've done oil, battery, stator but nothing else yet.

TIA
This will answer your questions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=6&v=3mf6qRY0Syo
 
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