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I don't know why more manufacturers don't go with a "common bolt size" approach... probably production costs. I'd love to only need one size socket. Of course that's probably too simplistic but the thought is a good one!
 

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Discussion Starter #182
I don't know why more manufacturers don't go with a "common bolt size" approach... probably production costs. I'd love to only need one size socket. Of course that's probably too simplistic but the thought is a good one!
just engineering decisions based on tensile and shear, so they can't standard size down, and don't want to standard size up. bike in the shop, you have all the tools for anything encountered, but traveling, you don't have that selection available. once the decision is made to produce a largely bolt-together front end instead of welded, then you might as well standardize fasteners, weld nuts being a bonus. as i've said, you're not likely to make a field fix on an all welded front, it's even tough to get one straightened out in a shop setting. with the bolt-together, i can pull it apart, beat the individual pieces straight on just about any flat surface, then bolt it back together and advance.

now i'm getting visions of pounding a pile of junk in shape on top of an abandoned railroad track out in BFE. either that or a flat rock, lordy, knock on wood.
 

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...either that or a flat rock, lordy, knock on wood.
I don't think you'll be able to straighten ANYTHING if you put it on a plank, to "...lordy, knock on wood...".

;)
 

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Discussion Starter #184
I don't think you'll be able to straighten ANYTHING if you put it on a plank, to "...lordy, knock on wood...".

;)
aha, now the picture becomes clear. as a child, you were the only one in the room who never understood a knock knock joke.

i could have said "any flat surface", but it doesn't translate well in spanglish for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #185
got a bunch of little pieces, time to fit and weld. this is the ignition switch mount, but a few other things bolt up also.

11 pieces, plus weld nuts. gets smoothed before paint, but i like to jump ahead with a few more parts before prep just to make sure there aren't additional changes. the OEM switch mount on the early generation of the ER6 bikes was part of the top clamp, and often partially buried under cables and harness. this mount raises the switch a couple inches so you can stab it with the key first try even with gloves on.

 

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Discussion Starter #190
seems like i've been planning to buy a TIG for a decade, finally ordered one last week, delivered in 5 days. picking up a bottle of argon tomorrow, my gas guy will do an exchange on one of my ar/co2 bottles. hope everything is ok inside the carton, you can see where some yahoo left a boot print on the face of the carton despite the up arrow.

you could spend days trying to figure out which inverter TIG to purchase, there are hundreds of different models, many different features, and the prices are thousands apart top to bottom. for these small bike parts, now the game is MIG to position tack, TIG to finish weld.
 

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Discussion Starter #192 (Edited)
Good idea. that area is always busy for me with my device charging station and getting my hands in there to go along with my eyes is a chore sometimes!.
agree, but even worse on the V649 rats because there's more wiring and nothing in the original routing, cables or harness. with the switch in the OEM top clamp location, the darn thing was buried, you actually had to move various things out of the way to get the key in there, worse in the dark. the switch assembly is an odd shape and doesn't drop through a round hole, so it requires a little finesse to create an acceptable mount to bolt it up.

for anyone looking at the OEM switch mounting in the OEM fork clamp from the underside, it appears that the switch is riveted to the top clamp, but these are just anti theft fasteners that can be carefully drilled out to separate the two pieces. when you've drilled the heads stop and separate the switch from the clamp, that leaves enough of the M6 shafts to grab with a pair of vicegrips with sharp jaws and wind out. these are set with a dab of red, don't booger things up.
 

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Discussion Starter #193
waiting on some of the bike stuff i've ordered, but shipping is so screwed up right now, maybe i'll see it, maybe i won't.

one particular USPS shipment i've been waiting for slipped off the tracking radar without explanation, then eventually was tracked after lengthy delay to a distribution center only 60 miles away, oh good, but then disappeared again. now the package pops up on tracking recently, it's been scanned at a new location 300 miles away. no scan since then, freakin' disappeared, it's like an animate being that doesn't want to be found and keeps escaping the system...one of them there sci-fi deals from the tube, the package got tiny little legs, or somethin', runs away and hides.

one shipment 3 weeks in transit, another 2 weeks on the road. nobody has a clue where these are at a given point in time, even though they're supposed to be scanned every time some sorter touches it. much grass, USPS, ya know those peeps with their hands out to get another 10 billion to cover their losses in 2020.
 

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Discussion Starter #194
i got a little out of sequence on the Cycra Probend/ProTaper 1 1/8" bars, should have clamped the bars in a vise and try-fitted the Cycra guards. i had been using the SE bars and never had an issue, but the fat style bars in this bend have a very short sweet spot between the bar riser and the first radius, and that means there's very little room to properly land the hand guard clamp. Cycra has several versions of guard mounts, but even the mounts with an offset didn't do the job. i could have tightened the clamps on the bar radius and made a connection, but i knew i wouldn't like the result.

to make things work, it looks like the bars need to be shortened slightly, then a small bend added to the Cycra backbones...in other words, bars are either removed and cut, or cut in place, and the Cycras get tweaked in the bender, oh well, shouldn't take long.

Cycra offset clamps.

 

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Discussion Starter #195
i recently added this positioner to the toolbox. guys that are involved with industrial control systems, robotics, or even RC toys would recognize this little tool, probably SOP for their work or hobby. i'm not working on any of that stuff, but i do end up rewiring both the front and back of the V649 bikes, no way around it with all the changes made. my connections are all soldered, been doing it that way since forever, so i'm not going to spend a word on the solder/crimp debate.

the fixture is adjustable XYZ, and the small clips hold the wires that get a soldered connection. the tool stands on the workbench, or can be clamped to the bike for making connections in place. these positioners are found cheap online.

 

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Discussion Starter #196 (Edited)
i'm beyond ready to try the new TIG, but decided i needed to get a little more organized in the shop. i looked at carts for the TIG, both manufactured and shop built, but didn't see much that would work. i did decide that i didn't want another cart, the MIG was already sitting on one of those. i had a spare cabinet in the shop, heavy duty, damn thing must weigh 3-400#, lets use the cabinet for both machines. changed out the light duty casters already mounted for a set of heavy duty commercial grade swivel casters that i had on hand. now to check the scrap pile for enough steel to start the fabrication, gotta get to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #197
the cabinet i'm modifying for my welding gear is a Knaack brand cabinet, a brand i've been using for some 50 odd years on construction jobs and shop environments. heavy duty commercial construction, the MSRP on these things is crazy, so locate a used Knaack if you need one. i didn't want to weld attachments directly to the cabinet, and a bolt/nut arrangement is inconvenient to get at if the drawers are installed...time to break out the rivnuts, both shear and pull out ratings fine for what i want to do.

there must be hundreds of rivnut installation tools available, but there are industry standards on the rivnuts themselves which guarantees that rivnuts will fit your choice in tool.

[IMG]


the cabinet gets a row of five 5/16" rivnuts top and bottom each end, should support all the junk i want to hang on there. i like swivel casters all the way around for things that get moved around the shop, so i swapped in a nice set of HD swivel casters i had on hand. good casters have a zerk for both the axle and bearing swivel, grease before install since it's a pain in the butt after you mount them.

 

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Discussion Starter #200
prepping the steel pieces that make up the sub assemblies for the cabinet, sized, then run through the drill press for dozens of 1/2" holes. i've said it before, there's a huge advantage in running twist drills at slow speeds, given that your drill press is not using coolant spray. slow mean cool, and cool means that your twist drills will last a long time. maybe 10X, maybe 20X or more vs running at higher RPM and hot. it's also safer, less crap flying all over your shop.

slow and cool, got a bite with a sharp twist drill and ran it right through the material, no chips, just twists.

[IMG]


first end panel tacked together on the table. takes way longer to set up than it does to tack, but if you want to have something when you're done, double check, then clamp the hell out of it to hold it in place.

[IMG]
 
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