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"Ninja 650 compatibility" thread, c'mon man, where has everyone been?

i've been running cop motors, ie the ER6 sportbike motors, in the Versys for only about 10 years. for a fact, i've never bothered to run the OEM Versys motor, why bother when the cop motor outperforms in both HP and torque.

for those that say you wouldn't notice the difference between the two...nonsense.

2012 cop motor in Versys, makes the scooter scoot...
It looks very nice!!
 

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Discussion Starter #123
It looks very nice!!
thanks, it'll look even better fully commissioned.

once again, talk on this forum about plug and play spoke wheels for the Versys, have at it if you want to pay the price, not many did the first time around.

i like my cheap 17/19 spokes better, quality used wheel set originally for a DR650, now fitted on a Versys, easy work.
 

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Discussion Starter #124
in other forum news via the waybackthere machine...

the much scrambled, much edited, and ultimately locked thread found on this forum titled

Kawasaki ER-6C, that's C as in Custom

is closing in on 375,000 views, kinda surprising since my last post in there was in 2016.
 

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Having worked for a decade at a Japanese OEM HQ’d in SoCal, with quite a few LEO customers for their “cop” offerings, I was curious if there actually are LEO’s using Kawasaki twins but instead got an ancient movie reference. Well done.
 

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Discussion Starter #126
Having worked for a decade at a Japanese OEM HQ’d in SoCal, with quite a few LEO customers for their “cop” offerings, I was curious if there actually are LEO’s using Kawasaki twins but instead got an ancient movie reference. Well done.
ancient movie reference, hey, this is some serious stuff we're talking about here. ok, so ya just joined the forum, i shouldn't expect that you would be familiar with the "cop" motor reference i've been using in the forum basement for 10 years.

let's see if i can address your question. yes, there are 650 ptwin powered ER6 platform motos used as police bikes, including the Versys, in various countries, but not the USA. photos of Versys police bikes have been posted on this forum. i am not aware of any factory high performance engine upgrades for Versys motos upfitted for police use.

bottom line, "cop motor" is a term i have used, and continue to use to differentiate the higher performance sportbike motor from the de-tuned version of the same motor which is used in the Versys. all six of my custom ER6 motos have run cop motors. i think i had cop tires on one of those bikes too, didn't help, it got run over by a grain truck in western Montana on my way back from Deadhorse.
 

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Discussion Starter #128
THE KWIK MART KHRONICLES 97

The dinner special, two pieces of pie, and fully fueled at the Relais 381 pumps, it was only 80 miles south to the Riviere Rupert. I had slowed down to an easy cruise, just enjoying the day with plenty to look at. A dozen shades of green on the trees, a dozen shades of brown on the rocks. The Route du Nord intersection is on the left, I'll see you tomorrow. The Rupert is just ten miles farther south.

I suppose the wayside there is not for camping, but I wanted to camp at this particular spot. This is the site of the old 1200 meter Cree portage around a small falls and a long series of rapids, and had been used for centuries, more likely thousands of years. At this same time last season I had been on the Albany River across James Bay to the west, mapping the traditional Cree portages found there along the established trade routes. With most of the water diverted now, you might wonder what all the fuss was about. Before the diversion this section was considered unrunnable even with modern river craft, forget anything with a hull made from bark or skin. Many had tried, many had died trying.



Two men were sitting on top of a picnic table towards the front, so I went over to ask them if they thought it would be ok to camp. The older of the two was a bulky hard muscled 5'10", and covered with elaborate black ink tats, including neck and shaved head. My impression was that this is one freakin' dangerous dude, nothing fake about him, and he had that little amused half smile that only a real deal tough guy can achieve. If he hadn't shaved, you might not notice that ragged scar that ran from ear to chin along his jaw bone. If whatever had cut him had been a fraction lower, he wouldn't be sittin' in the sun on that table. They spoke little English, but understood what I was asking. In halting English, the tat man finally said "In Quebec we are free, we do what we want, you can stay". In the time that guy sat at the table up front, a number of cars pulled in. Nobody got out, nobody stared, nobody lingered.

I ran the bike down the footpath and set up camp at the back near the river. The ground was solid exposed rock and I had to find some boulders to hold the tent down, no chance to drive a stake. So there I was as the sun went down, ready to sleep on the same rocks where the ancients had walked for so many years. I had visions.
 

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THE KWIK MART KHRONICLES 97

The dinner special, two pieces of pie, and fully fueled at the Relais 381 pumps, it was only 80 miles south to the Riviere Rupert. I had slowed down to an easy cruise, just enjoying the day with plenty to look at. A dozen shades of green on the trees, a dozen shades of brown on the rocks. The Route du Nord intersection is on the left, I'll see you tomorrow. The Rupert is just ten miles farther south.

I suppose the wayside there is not for camping, but I wanted to camp at this particular spot. This is the site of the old 1200 meter Cree portage around a small falls and a long series of rapids, and had been used for centuries, more likely thousands of years. At this same time last season I had been on the Albany River across James Bay to the west, mapping the traditional Cree portages found there along the established trade routes. With most of the water diverted now, you might wonder what all the fuss was about. Before the diversion this section was considered unrunnable even with modern river craft, forget anything with a hull made from bark or skin. Many had tried, many had died trying.



Two men were sitting on top of a picnic table towards the front, so I went over to ask them if they thought it would be ok to camp. The older of the two was a bulky hard muscled 5'10", and covered with elaborate black ink tats, including neck and shaved head. My impression was that this is one freakin' dangerous dude, nothing fake about him, and he had that little amused half smile that only a real deal tough guy can achieve. If he hadn't shaved, you might not notice that ragged scar that ran from ear to chin along his jaw bone. If whatever had cut him had been a fraction lower, he wouldn't be sittin' in the sun on that table. They spoke little English, but understood what I was asking. In halting English, the tat man finally said "In Quebec we are free, we do what we want, you can stay". In the time that guy sat at the table up front, a number of cars pulled in. Nobody got out, nobody stared, nobody lingered.

I ran the bike down the footpath and set up camp at the back near the river. The ground was solid exposed rock and I had to find some boulders to hold the tent down, no chance to drive a stake. So there I was as the sun went down, ready to sleep on the same rocks where the ancients had walked for so many years. I had visions.
Cool place to travel and explore. I went up there about 10 years ago. Did the photo of the bike "in James Bay(low tide). The boat and snowmobile livery is interesting to see. Camped one night in Radisson at the campground there.

I was on a Concours 1000 so not much off the pavement stuff.

At the Relais 381 stop, do they still have the note on the gas pump(s) that says not self service, wait for the gas boy? I got a good chuckle from that.

I was more than a bit annoyed that the info boards at the various pull outs were only in French and Cree, but it is Quebec.

All in all, a very nice trip. Met some nice folks.

Safe travels and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #130
Cool place to travel and explore...
yes it is, for us anyway, while others consider that black spruce country a complete bore, nothing to see. besides the Baie James and Trans Taiga, they're thinking of extending the road north another 250km. that new road would draw me back up there.

my gasboy...



she spoke zero english, but was able to communicate her wish to barter a tutorial in French for a tutorial in English, she already had some English For Dummies type textbooks. my French is beyond hope, she had no idea what a poor bargain she was proposing.

i also camped at Radisson, nice spot, with the only other occupant being an old guy from Montreal in a big motorhome who wanted to know all about my trip. he laughed when i told him about missing my turn north on 309 due to insane road construction, getting lost, then seeking assistance...

Just then, a BMW pulls in and parks right in front of me. A woman steps out, soft leather briefcase in hand, and…man-o-man was she gorgeous, welcome to Quebec. She goes into an office, but only five minutes later she’s back out and walking to her car. Hmmm, what are the chances that she can give this lost Yank some directions? I didn’t think it would be appropriate to yell, so when she was looking at me I waved my Quebec road map a little. I could see a split second of indecision, but then she walked right over.

She started addressing me in French from a distance of ten feet. I don’t know enough French to say much of anything, and by the time she was three feet from me, I couldn’t speak English either. She was doing her best with limited English to explain to me where I needed to go to catch that road north. Me, I was just doing a little pointing and trying not to stare. Ok, we’re set, I thank her, and she leaves with a smile and a little wave. Only certain women can do that wave, but she was one.

I did learn a few things from her and I was very grateful. I found out where I was and how to get to where I needed to go. Secondly, I found out that it was not necessary for a beautiful business woman in Quebec to wear undergarments of any kind, and that a lack of undergarments did not preclude wearing semi sheer clothing. I was in a foreign country and these kinds of cultural distinctions were important to know. Thirdly, I found out that if the molecules from a beautiful Quebec woman’s perfume happened to land on your riding gear, they are guaranteed to stay stuck there for about 24 hours.


he went on to say that Montreal had the most beautiful women in the world, don't know for sure, those women in Quebec City looked great too.

i rode out to Pointe Longue, crossing the Centrale La Grande-1 dam, didn't go into Chisasibi. lots of freight canoes at that landing also. i used that exact style of boat in northern Manitoba a few years earlier.

i did ride the Trans Taiga out to Caniapiscau, the farthest you can get from any town in North America, 745km. from Mirage Outfitters to Relais 381 is the longest distance between reliable fuel in all of NA, 517 km.

adventure on the Trans Taiga...

I hadn’t seen any vehicles yet, but as I continued west, graders had worked the road yesterday and I could see some tire tracks. I had adopted the practice of using the banking in the corners just like everyone else when I had a sight line through the curve. This kept me out of the deep gravel on top and usually there was a well worn line down low, sometimes two.

I was riding comfortably at 50 and downshifted to 5th for a little compression braking as I rapidly approached a sweeping left hand curve. There was moderate banking here with deep gravel thrown up the banking and covering the whole west bound lane. I dropped down and picked a line on the upper track in the east bound side, ran over a patch of marbles, drifted a little lower, and rode right into a deep sand hole saturated by the recent rain.

The front wheel dropped into the hole and the bars were nearly ripped from my hands. I was on the gas instantly, the front end lifted, the rear end came around left, and I roared up out of that sand like I was attached to a bungie cord. Now I’m crossed up right, shooting up the banking at a shallow angle, and in real trouble. My entire world was inside a little circle centered on the bike where the action was going by in high def clarity. Everything outside that circle was a complete blur.

Off the gas a fraction of a second, the bike straightened up, but I’m in the marbles on top of the banking and about to run off the road. Stab the shifter into 4th without the clutch, lean left, and now the rear is coming around right in a spray of loose gravel. I can’t believe I’m up. Still at 40 going down the banking at an angle, now I’m going to run off into the trees at the inside of the curve, not in control yet. I muscled the bike back around right, stabbed the shifter again, and on the gas in 3rd when I find another sand hole down low. The bike snapped upright and instead of another lowside, I almost highside. I wanted to be going right and ended up coming around left, still on the gas, that engine was howling.

I was moving too fast to catch the upper east bound track, but landed in the hard lower track, upright, straight, and coasting. My heart had stopped beating. I had forgotten how to breathe. My throat felt like sandpaper, I know I was yelling something on that roller coaster, don’t ask me exactly what. It was all over in some very long seconds.

I never stopped. If I hadn’t been dazed, I might have. At a quarter mile I was fidgeting around in the seat trying to get comfortable again, and at the half mile mark I was back in 6th and rollin’ west at 50. There was nothing else to do. I had been riding at a deliberate pace, not slow, but not nutso fast either. I couldn’t think of anything to change. Being in 5th sure helped me power out of that first hole, and not for the first time, but 4th gear was the one that saved my ass. From that curve forward, I thought of 4th as my “get me the **** outta here” gear, and would need it again on the gravel ahead.


regarding info signs, the Cree are not friendly with French speaking Quebec, and as a result, speak English. they don't want French on those signs either.
 

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Good stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #133
the 2019 Versys didn't make the finish line in 2019, it was buried under a pile of junk in the back of the shop. now it's 2020, better finish it up, some rides planned...besides, that KLX700 is on the horizon, and the V649 ain't going to play second fiddle.

the front end is fabricated, just needs installation, and then the 100 other little things to put it on the street, no big deal.

 

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Discussion Starter #134
bam, and just like that we're back in business after months of having this thread locked by...well, it's a very sad and unfortunate story in the history of the forum. anyway, the perp has faded away, thank goodness, and now the forum is showing some vitality again with increased inmate participation, always a good sign.

search is still a bit of a jumble, so if any questions arise about these bike builds, you can always ask directly right here

time to get this moto completed, if i'm not careful it will be the 2021 Versys, not the 2019 Versys. many constraints on my shop time for the last year and a half.
 

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Discussion Starter #139
THE KWIK MART KHRONICLES 98

Fuel required, and up pops a sign for another Loves, this time with an attached Subway, perfect. I needed the bread that was wrapped around one of them footlongs to soak up all the lard I ate for breakfast, just a comforting theory, but it better work quick, that morning biscuit was about to go through me faster than flippin' fatback an' greens.

While pumping the fuel, I noticed a little sign that said 20% biodiesel, who knew, might explain the poor fuel economy from the last tank of Loves, even if the exhaust didn't smell like deep-fried chicken. I talked briefly with a guy interested in the bike, "That's a dual use isn't it?". See, even the general public knows about this stuff, but then he had a Minnesota plate on the car, and those folks are supposed to know just about everything.

Into Subway, I was halfway through my order when a guy walked up, geeeeez, the mouth breather dude invaded my personal space, even the gal taking my order was shaking her head, suppressing a laugh. The guy was wearing a designer wife beater, way too short and way too tight nylon running shorts showcasing the junk, and mandles. The thing that looked like it was glued to his noggin might have been a blond porcupine, long dead. Don't forget the cologne, pour a few drops of that stuff on one of them fire ant mounds they got around here and it would kill every one of them suckers stone dead.


Oh boy, welcome to Texas. Gimme some room buddy, and as I rolled my shoulders around some, no subtlety, he jumped back five feet. When his turn, the guy placed a duplicate of my order, and I do mean exactly and precisely the same. I think I'll eat my sub at the truck, outta nut case range, give him time to head back to the salon.

The weather was perfect for the parade of yoga pants marching around, the national uniform that bans boredom from the casually observant, and if ever there was ever a fashion trend, it was to make sure the thong was color coordinated. I'm happy to report that these Texas gals were very current in that regard, including the one that was washing the windshield on sugah daddy's new Corvette, daddy himself looking on with approval. She was something, for sure, didn't mind doing a little looking on myself as she stretched herself across the front of that car. I was thinking, damn big Brembos on that thing, looks kinda sulky, or something like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #140
ok, time to pause my commemorative spoon collection activities, it was a Wuhan respite anyway, and get back in the moto game.

shop relocated, and while the organization effort seems unending, i've finally carved out enough room for the lift, plus a little space for actual work...whew. i'm still burdened by too much junk, and it's junk of the worst kind...takes up way too much space, is too potentially useful to throw away, and there's no market to sell it. don't get me started, i'll whine about this crap all day.

while the shop organization was on going, i decided to change up my welders, i had the time and didn't need a welder for awhile. i'd already sold 3 mig welders and two stick welders, mostly blue, and was left with my 30y/o Millermatic mig, and new Hobart 140. lots of welders out there, prices all over the place. i decided to replace both remaining migs with a single new mig machine, and promptly sold the Miller for more than i paid for it on sale 3 decades ago, can't complain. this sale completely funded a new Hobart210 MVP with Hobart spool gun which i'll set up for aluminum. still have my Hobart140, like new, perfect 115V welder, $375 for anyone interested in eastern Virginia.

got the new Hobart, the first job was to fix my welding table which is a Knaack folding work bench. ok, so it's not a proper industrial welding table, but i've been using it for welding projects for decades. i had two of these, sold one. in the old shop, the tables were stationary, never moved, but now with limited space the table needs to roll.

got to add casters, not tiny ones either. my spec is 4" minimum, all swivel w/locks for shop use, and these would raise the working surface 6" above the optimum 36" height, can't have that. the casters can't increase the bench footprint either, space is tight.

solution, whip up some custom caster mounts that point inboard...now i'm ready to roll, literally.

 
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