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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the tallest gearing change anyone has made and the results, I have changed gearing on many of the bikes I have owned some turned out good a couple not so much, the largest change was around 25% after riding the VX3 I think with a reasonable lightweight rider this bike could pull that high gearing? It seems the one tooth up on the front is the most common change with positive results and a good start.
 

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Most 6 speed transmission motorcycles with stock gearing reach their top speed in 5th gear. That tells you a lot about the lack of power to overcome dynamic forces in 6th gear. If your goal is to cruise at a lower RPM knowing that it might not increase fuel economy and require multiple downshifts to pass, then go for it.

If your goal is a higher top speed, ain't gonna happen.

The 300X is designed to cruise at higher RPMs and lugging the engine can be worse for it than running at proper RPMs.

I would also measure the voltage output at the desired cruising RPM to ensure it is putting out enough to run the bike, charge the batter, and power any accessories you might want to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As an example, the 250 Virago/Vstar is geared way too low from the factory you can be in 5th gear by 35 mph, the most common mod is to change the gearing by 23% which is the largest front and smallest rear sprocket that will fit on the bike. Personal experience the top speed is nearly the same and gas mileage improves by up to 5 MPG. Mine averages 82 with a high of 96 low of 72, yes that is amazing! This bike has around 20 HP and almost no torque, a lot like the VX3. The VX3 has nearly double the HP though, So based on this experience along with a 250 Ninja, 250 Eliminators and several other bikes up to 1100cc i have found all of them can run taller gearing without problems. Lugging the small engines in not good, there is always a lower gear to shift into. It's a personal choice, some want lower gearing than stock. I am leaning toward a 15/40 combo, anyone running this combination?
 

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As an example, the 250 Virago/Vstar is geared way too low from the factory you can be in 5th gear by 35 mph, the most common mod is to change the gearing by 23% which is the largest front and smallest rear sprocket that will fit on the bike. Personal experience the top speed is nearly the same and gas mileage improves by up to 5 MPG. Mine averages 82 with a high of 96 low of 72, yes that is amazing! This bike has around 20 HP and almost no torque, a lot like the VX3. The VX3 has nearly double the HP though, So based on this experience along with a 250 Ninja, 250 Eliminators and several other bikes up to 1100cc i have found all of them can run taller gearing without problems. Lugging the small engines in not good, there is always a lower gear to shift into. It's a personal choice, some want lower gearing than stock. I am leaning toward a 15/40 combo, anyone running this combination?
It also depends on where you live and ride. Florida versus the North Carolina mountains is going to factor a lot into what gearing works for you.

I have a Van Van 200 and with the stock gearing I am in top (5th) gear at 35 mph, and top speed with me on the bike is 60 mph unless on flat terrain and then eventually will see 65 mph. Most of the hills around me have to be climbed at 30 mph in 3rd gear. Yet, some guys still change the gearing. To each their own.

Asking others if they run the combo you are interested in, without knowing where they ride and how much they weigh isn't going to give you the warm fuzzy you are looking for before spending the money. You obviously want to do it, so be the one who runs the experiment and report back. You obviously must be small in stature and lightweight based on the bikes you listed above so your results would definitely be different than mine. I couldn't even turn the handlebars to full lock when I tried to ride my niece's star 250, and my feet hung off the front of my nephew's star 650.
 

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It also depends on where you live and ride. Florida versus the North Carolina mountains is going to factor a lot into what gearing works for you.

I have a Van Van 200 and with the stock gearing I am in top (5th) gear at 35 mph, and top speed with me on the bike is 60 mph unless on flat terrain and then eventually will see 65 mph. Most of the hills around me have to be climbed at 30 mph in 3rd gear. Yet, some guys still change the gearing. To each their own.

Asking others if they run the combo you are interested in, without knowing where they ride and how much they weigh isn't going to give you the warm fuzzy you are looking for before spending the money. You obviously want to do it, so be the one who runs the experiment and report back. You obviously must be small in stature and lightweight based on the bikes you listed above so your results would definitely be different than mine. I couldn't even turn the handlebars to full lock when I tried to ride my niece's star 250, and my feet hung off the front of my nephew's star 650.
Wise words.

I always liked the idea of those Van Van's! Very neat bikes.
 
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What is the tallest gearing change anyone has made and the results, I have changed gearing on many of the bikes I have owned some turned out good a couple not so much, the largest change was around 25% after riding the VX3 I think with a reasonable lightweight rider this bike could pull that high gearing? It seems the one tooth up on the front is the most common change with positive results and a good start.
Driffer- the Versys X300 has three speed sensors ( front wheel, rear wheel and one on the countershaft ). If your X300 has the ABS which most do - there is a limit as to how much the gearing can change with out the dash board going a bit crazy - as in the Check Engine and ABS light, the gear indicator blanks out and two error codes are displayed. It's a mess to get that all cleared at a dealer or try to do it yourself with a button pushed. The limit is about 10% especially 2017 through about 2019 bikes. If you have a 2020/2021 your bike may allow most change. This is based on several X300 owners of different years. What this mean is you can change the front to a 15 tooth sprocket or change the back down to 43 tooth sprocket but NOT BOTH.
The front 15 tooth swap is the way to go as it is simpler and cheaper.
I explain this in great detail right here on this Kawasaki Versys.com forum.
Here is the direct link to the post that will help you decide what to do.
LINK: (2) Sources, cost and links for front 14 & 15 rubber bumpered and 43 & 46 rear sprockets | Kawasaki Versys Forum
Just scroll up. I went with the 15 tooth rubber bumpered sprocket and it is working out great.
My Youtube channel has a 2 part video that is hands on and will show you eveything including the sources and links as well. LINK: 2017 to 2021 Kawasaki Versys X300 changing to a JT Sprocket 15T rubber cushion (part 1 of 2) - YouTube
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dave, thanks for the link, I will check your channel. I am aware of the fault codes and the simper jumper wire mod to eliminate them. A 15 tooth alone will not be enough for me. I have always experimented with many changes and mods.

Twowheel, after riding for 51 years with many thousands of miles under my wheels and dozens of gearing changes I don't ever recall getting a warm fuzzy feeling about 2 metal sprockets, maybe you could explain that? You are correct, as I have learned, the environment you spend the most time in does make a difference on the mods you make.

I mentioned the smaller bikes because this is a small bike thread, if I were on a Drag Bike forum I would have referenced my former bike or the Norton forum the Nortons, or whatever the forum I was on at the time.

You sound like are a really big guy, you must look like a monkey humping a football on this little 300 what attracted you to these small bikes? You should give the KLR a look, great bikes and a size or so bigger than the VX3, it should be a better fit.
 

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That’s an awesome visual! Haven’t heard that one in a while 🤣😂. Play nice now

View attachment 185296
If that was the visual about the versys 300 ... I'd hate to think about the visual for the van van 😇😁

My mom did say I looked like a duck on a junebug when I rode my CRF230M ... I don't think she knew anything about monkey's and footballs ... and that really shouldn't be funny ... almost ashamed I laughed. No offense to @twowheeladdict
 

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Dave, thanks for the link, I will check your channel. I am aware of the fault codes and the simper jumper wire mod to eliminate them. A 15 tooth alone will not be enough for me. I have always experimented with many changes and mods.

Twowheel, after riding for 51 years with many thousands of miles under my wheels and dozens of gearing changes I don't ever recall getting a warm fuzzy feeling about 2 metal sprockets, maybe you could explain that? You are correct, as I have learned, the environment you spend the most time in does make a difference on the mods you make.

I mentioned the smaller bikes because this is a small bike thread, if I were on a Drag Bike forum I would have referenced my former bike or the Norton forum the Nortons, or whatever the forum I was on at the time.

You sound like are a really big guy, you must look like a monkey humping a football on this little 300 what attracted you to these small bikes? You should give the KLR a look, great bikes and a size or so bigger than the VX3, it should be a better fit.
Are you referring to the jumper wire to bypass the clutch ? I've posted the complete breakdown of where to buy the front (14 or 15 rubber bumpered sprocket) and the rear (43 or 46 tooth sprocket) which are half the cost of OEM units please see my post above that has the link to the detail.
 

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Dave, thanks for the link, I will check your channel. I am aware of the fault codes and the simper jumper wire mod to eliminate them. A 15 tooth alone will not be enough for me. I have always experimented with many changes and mods.

Twowheel, after riding for 51 years with many thousands of miles under my wheels and dozens of gearing changes I don't ever recall getting a warm fuzzy feeling about 2 metal sprockets, maybe you could explain that? You are correct, as I have learned, the environment you spend the most time in does make a difference on the mods you make.

I mentioned the smaller bikes because this is a small bike thread, if I were on a Drag Bike forum I would have referenced my former bike or the Norton forum the Nortons, or whatever the forum I was on at the time.

You sound like are a really big guy, you must look like a monkey humping a football on this little 300 what attracted you to these small bikes? You should give the KLR a look, great bikes and a size or so bigger than the VX3, it should be a better fit.
Owned an '08 KLR650. Never buy the same bike twice. Too many to try.

Have you thought about putting a taller rear tire to change your effective ratio and add a little more rubber for comfort and traction?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Dave, yes the clutch jumper wire. My plan is to use an aluminum rear sprocket to save a lb or 2 and the front damped one you found.

TwoWheel, yes that is one way to lower the gearing, but a bigger tire adds more weight and rolling resistance, two things I do not want. Weight loss and increasing mileage are the long term goals. Planning on going tubeless as well. I am losing weight myself to help the cause.
 

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My plan is to use an aluminum rear sprocket to save a lb or 2 and the front damped one you found.
I’m thinking an aluminum rear sprocket is probably worth a try. I noticed a little extra tire mass going with the Avon Trailrider, radial tire. (They sure stick to the pavement great. Allowing full lean angles!) Knocking that mass back down a little can only help. Never tried an aluminum sprocket. I’ve been shaft drive since late ‘80s until getting the Vx about 1.5 yrs now. Thinking it might not wear too too fast under 40 hp and 48 teeth. Thinking anodized hard coat is probably a good idea. Don’t know if they heat treat them as well, or if that’s advisable. Anyone in the know about using these?
 

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...My plan is to use an aluminum rear sprocket to save a lb or 2 and the front damped one you found....
...I’m thinking an aluminum rear sprocket is probably worth a try....
Be advised that the aluminum sprocket will NOT last nearly as long as the steel ones. PLUS - they co$t more.
 
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