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Discussion Starter #1
I will be replacing the tires this season for the first time. I have no problem pulling the wheels. My question is, what do I need to remove from the wheels before I take them to the shop? Or do I just leave the brake rotors, chain sprockets and everything in place? What about the spacers?

I understand the need to block up the wheels if laid down to protect the rotors and sprockets, but don't want to look like an idiot if those things need to be removed before showing up at the shop. :(

:thanx:

On a second note, anybody know if there are any tire threads here that would help me choose a new set? :joke:
 

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Have you ever removed your front calipers? They may be on tight with Loctite, and the 12mm bolt heads are a bit soft. You also need a 14mm Allen hex key to loosen front axle, after loosening the pinch bolt... You can leave the rotors and sprocket on. The spacers will just fall off, but you can tape up the holes to protect the seals and keep them clean. They should hopefully be competent enough to be careful. You can wipe out the space between dust seal and bearing, and pack it up with new grease when you reinstall wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You can wipe out the space between dust seal and bearing, and pack it up with new grease when you reinstall wheels.
Can I use the same grease on the dust seals and the axle itself? What kind of grease should I look for? I believe I am looking for high temp axle grease!

Thanks for your continued support invader!!
 

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NLGI #2 grease, as used for bearings, ball joints, etc.

You should be able to pull out the sprocket and hub assembly and rubber cush drive from rear wheel, and make it lighter to carry as well.
 

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You don't remove anything from the wheels because the entire spinning mass is what gets balanced.

With our painted rims you do have to watchfull of them scratching them on their machine.

Also, make sure you follow the install instructions to the letter. Many people forget to put a block of wood in front of the front wheel and pump the suspension to get things aligned.

Just a thin coating of hi-temp grease after you make sure the parts are clean.
 

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Ok thank you. Got it now. Apparently I was skipping 2 steps. I wasn't removing the lower fairing and I didn't pump the suspension.
 

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Also, the way you reassemble your forks after you replace fork oil can affect axle thread alignment and installation ease, as does fork legs' height in triple clamps.. Set both fork caps equally on their theaded rod, as it affects initial spring preload and extended fork length.
 

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So now the question is should I loosen the axle clamp bolt, pump the suspension, and re tighten since I didn't do that last time I took the wheel off?
 

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That's a pretty good price weljo but I don't think my local cycle gear charges me to swap out a tire if I buy the tire from them. Anytime I can save 35 dollars or more then it's definitely worth the hassle. :)

And I think they charge 20 dollars if I don't buy the tire from them. Still worth the hassle to me. Besides, I have to justify the cost of the motorcycle stands I bought :)
 

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It's a good idea to mark the front wheel for direction of rotation.

This is because the wheel can be reinstalled either way, and because some tires have to be mounted to rotate in the direction they're marked. Make the shop aware of this, and check when picking the wheels up before you leave the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
why mess with the hassles?
I would have to say that since it is my bike I will pay better attention to detail as I take things apart and put them back. I can clean up some hard to otherwise reach areas, inspect and lube what needs lubricating, align the wheel and set proper chain slack, ensure the proper torque on bolts, use of new cotter pin, etc... Not to mention, it is fun and I learn more with every task I conquer!

Thanks for the link! :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It's a good idea to mark the front wheel for direction of rotation.
Good advice! According to the OEM Maintenance Book (see post 8 above) there is a rotation arrow mark on the wheel. I have not verified that it is actually there. Good to keep that in mind!
 

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Not to mention, it is fun and I learn more with every task I conquer!
I will say that taking off the wheels is a whole lot easier for me than changing the tires. Removing and replacing the tires is usually a frustrating and tiring process. Once I get it done I am usually in too bad of a mood to appreciate installing the wheels. So far I have managed to not install anything backwards yet.

According to the OEM Maintenance Book (see post 8 above) there is a rotation arrow mark on the wheel. I have not verified that it is actually there.
The mark is certainly there on my '08. Make sure that the tire installer gets things on in the correct direction before installing the wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The mark is certainly there on my '08. Make sure that the tire installer gets things on in the correct direction before installing the wheels.
:thumb: Will do! Especially since the shop I will be using is a 30 minute drive..
 
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