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Adjustment screws are on the rear of throttle bodies, and are better accessible with airbox removed. Your readings are fine as they are dependent on idle speed... Just check vacuum synch at indicated 1,300 rpm idle. You want to leave the closed adjustment screw closed, and adjust the screw that is already open on the other throttle body to have both vacuum readings equal. If it's your left TB screw that is open, you will close it slightly to raise its reading to have them both at the same level.... I just set mine with airbox removed, and rear of fuel tank propped up. I covered my TB openings with the air filter foam element.
 

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Check my Post

If you look at the very first picture, you will see my sync of my 2015. Exactly the same and in spec. you need to read the manual for carbtune. The service manual says 37.9 KPA which is 28.7 cmHG. In my photo I was at 26, carbtune states within 2 cmHG , on the first page they are talking balance being the most important , not the value of 26 or 28.


http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/1216537-post19.html
 

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If you look at the very first picture, you will see my sync of my 2015. Exactly the same and in spec. you need to read the manual for carbtune. The service manual says 37.9 KPA which is 28.7 cmHG. In my photo I was at 26, carbtune states within 2 cmHG , on the first page they are talking balance being the most important , not the value of 26 or 28.


http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/1216537-post19.html

Well this is not exactly true. Let's remember that the vacuum achieved has everything to do not with sync but with valve timing and seating, particularly seating. so if a bike is in need of a valve adjustment, the vacuum will be low on the cylinder with tight valves. I have done video's that address these issues

1)

2)

If you'll watch the first one you'll understand how the valve clearance results in pressurizing the intake, if you watch the second one, and particularly the part about how guys try to close the throttle adjuster to bring a low cylinder vacuum higher and only result in wedging the throttle valve against the bore which results in the inability to effect any further adjustment, you'll begin to understand how the valve adjustment is the primary driver of what the sync vacuum will be.

Also, whether or not the airbox is connected has nothing to do with the sync, as the manifold vacuum is separated from the airbox by the throttle plates. HTH, Steve
 

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Thanks/ I doubt my 2015 at under 11000 KM / Tight Valves

Thanks Steve
I will add that to the How To, normally if you do a valve shim, the next process is the sync. My case is a bit unusual as I did the sync around 7000 KM , since I had my bike apart at least 8 times with the ThermoBob changes, last change to a #4 was around 7000 KM, it was suggested to bring out my vacuum lines.It took a month to get my gauges from the UK, so I thought I would check it out as I was playing with the TPS settings to see if any changes coud be affected to the below 4000 RPM throttle response ( I now realize it is part of the mapping, with the oxygen and other feedback info). So another way of looking at it and as a early warning to tight valves. Like going into see your doctor for the very first time, check your blood pressure to establish a base line. The same can be done on your just broken in Versys, check your vacuum at idle RPM and take a picture /record it .
 
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