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Anyone know how to disconnect this plug from the stator? I can just barely reach it with my fingers and can probably get it loose, if I knew what the process was for releasing it. Seems simple enough, but when you can't really see it, not so easy. I've attached a picture.

I'm thinking my stator is shot because I'm not getting the 14.2+ volts at the battery. Will likely replace both the stator and the RR. I've also read a bit here about the RR being sub-optimal, but haven't found any other options.

BTW, this is a 2015 Versys 650, that I bought new. It was my first bike after 35+ years of not riding. It is now my go to bike, even though I also have a GS1200 and FZ-09.
180202
 

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Solved. I saw another post from onewizard that said squeeze and wiggle, that worked. Measurements sucked though. Now I need to order a new stator.
 

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I am on my original battery, 2015 Versys 650, however I have used a series regulator right from the first 5 Km . I don't expect to replace it until 2022, I average 6 to 7 years on a AGM battery.Check the voltage about 10 minutes after a ride. 12.5 VDC or less consider replacing.Also I would do a quick load test on it , that will be my plan this winter, 5 years old.
One other thing, the largest cause of failure for the stator and also a shortened life of the battery is the shunt regulator. A bad battery will only shorten the life of the stator if you have a series regulator installed,a shunt regulator and a bad battery will not cause a stator failure ( the exception would be if the bike quit suddenly, there have been several members that had a short occur within the battery Versys dead due to electrical gremlins ) and you would know you have a bad battery as starting the bike more than once in a 30 minute period wouldn't work. I explained that here:
Any electrical questions related to charging/ available power / series or shunt, just ask.
My post #19 I mention Electrosport , several have used them.delta wound same as OEM

 

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shunt regulator and a bad battery will not cause a stator failure ( the exception would be if the bike quit suddenly, there have been several members that had a short occur within the battery
You are probably right.
An old battery has less capacity, i.e. it would appear full and empty faster.
If it appears low voltage frequently (because starting consumes a lot), but the regulator doesn't feed more current to battery anyway, then you are right.
If it stops shunting and pours excessive current to battery, then the stator would be overloaded.
I will presume that engineers have chosen to limit charge current to respect chemistry (maybe 2A? which is nothing compared to the 4A just for 1 H7 headlight).

But I can't stop thinking that somehow an old battery is not helping...Old beliefs...

Otherwise, high oil temperature and acidifications are eating the stator dielectric coating with time.. which causes shorting coils, less stator voltage and more damaging heat. That's the main cause of stator failure.
 

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You are probably right.
An old battery has less capacity, i.e. it would appear full and empty faster.
If it appears low voltage frequently (because starting consumes a lot), but the regulator doesn't feed more current to battery anyway, then you are right.
If it stops shunting and pours excessive current to battery, then the stator would be overloaded.
I will presume that engineers have chosen to limit charge current to respect chemistry (maybe 2A? which is nothing compared to the 4A just for 1 H7 headlight).

But I can't stop thinking that somehow an old battery is not helping...Old beliefs...

Otherwise, high oil temperature and acidifications are eating the stator dielectric coating with time.. which causes shorting coils, less stator voltage and more damaging heat. That's the main cause of stator failure.
The red is incorrect, there is no limit on charge current. The blue is somewhat correct. The biggest issue is the shunt regulator and your regular driving of the bike, frequent short runs of under 50 miles per hour ( 80/KM/HR ) say 10 to 20 minutes, then at or above 50 miles 80 KM/HR , combined with duration's of under 2000 RPM for more than 6 minutes then RPM of 4000 RPM for duration's of 10 minutes or more, will cause expansion and contraction of the magnet wire and eventually you will get a short to ground , a short across the cross over connections or a turn to turn short. Once that short occurs, it gets up to 66% of the magnetic flux, after , we are talking complete failure.
I won't go into detail here but read the battery life post, I caution people in my Polaris series regulator conversion threads to test the stator using a digital meter and my test thread, because switching to a series regulator on a old stator that has minor damage, will almost guarantee failure, because the voltage across the winding's can reach the same as open circuit VAC. I am going to stop there, but what I will say, the cost of the Polaris regulator is almost made up just by the price of a replacement battery. In Canada my last price was something like $125 Canadian for a 4016868 Polaris , easily fitted ( it will be if I get at my header plug / triumph harnesses) to a 2015 or newer 650 Versys .
 
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