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I've added Denali D4 lights (which I absolutely love) and Oxford Heated Grips to my 2019 650 LT. I noticed on a recent ride that the LED on the Oxford controller was flashing. This happens when the heated grips controller senses that the battery voltage has fallen too low. Power to the grips is removed until the voltage climbs high enough and the heat is restored to the grips. According to Powerlet dot com, the "excess electrical capacity" of the Versys is only one star out of five." I had planned to add heated clothing (I live in Montana) and a couple of power outlets for phone/GPS, but apparently I'm already exceeding the stator's capacity.

Is there such a thing as a higher output stator available for the Versys?
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LED on the Oxford controller was flashing
Ive seen the same thing with my Oxford heaters when I've got the grips and my heated vest cranked up. I also have a Sparkbright voltage monitor which is very accurate. It will go red and the Oxford controller light will start blinking when stopped at a light ,for instance. I run all LED lighting as well. My idle is set at about 1,400when warm which is factory recommended on the 650 I think. My fix is to manually rev up a bit at a stop, just enough RPM to get my Sparkbright green again. Kinda requires paying attention .Yea, I would also be interested in a higher output stator!
 

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I would think that YOUR V650 (like MINE...) has the idle at ABOUT 1,350 rpm, altho' I set mine to 1,500 BECAUSE of the anemic output from the alternator.

I keep an eye on stator DC V output whenever I have the grips and my heated jacket liner both ON.
 

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I run oxford heated grips and the Gerbing jacket, I can run both at 100% at or above 2500 RPM with roughly a extra 30 watts at 14.2 volts available . I am now 100% LED lighting. I am running 35 watt SafeGo LED lights low and high beam. Denali trioptic 2.0 on high beam all the time, also Philips LED city lights. I have the Denali air horn . My light output is roughly 3 times that of incandescent and approximately 50% in actual wattage. As to stator capacity, 330 watts is the limit. I go into the orange with my neat little voltmeter at traffic lights, if air temp is around 0'C ( with both the grips and jacket powered), I am at 75% on the Oxford grips and at 7 on the gerbing jacket. I can run high beam on both the Denali and my headlight and stay in the green above 3000 RPM . Also I am running a Polaris 4016868 series regulator, rated at 50 amp.



 

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I don't know if there are aftermarket "JUMBO" stators available. But from an engineering POV, I can tell you the following.
The amount of power depends on the frequency and the amount of conductive winding's in the stator. As many already pointed out, revving it up increases power. An alternative stator would require more winding's, which brings along some other problems: More winding's (in the same small space ) generally means thinner winding's. And thinner winding's running more current means hotter windings, and all kinds of problems come with heat in stators. I think (and its just me thinking) that unless Kawasaki cheaped out on the copper in the stator, its already at its limit. I also think that there is more to be gained in changing the voltage regulator, all voltage regulators (alternators) in the motorcycle world are shit (in the efficientiy department ), it's a game of trying to find which one is the least shit.
 

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FYI my first 9 years of steady employment was in a electric motor shop. That was 1973 to 1982, after that I I served several apprenticeships and became a master electrician , plus many other certificate of qualification, completing my last years of approximately 37 specializing in large high frequency foundry inverters. You will find all kinds of technical information on this forum , that was posted by me. So I will describe several limitations and several ways of getting more wattage out. Much of what I post will have links describing in more detail , I don't expect those reading this to understand, however if any have questions feel free to ask.
Limitations:
Counter electromotive force Counter electromotive force - Google Search
Magnetic saturation Saturation Flux Density - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics Electrical steel - Wikipedia
Hysteresis & Eddie currents ( Eddy currents ) Ask Fasteddie --- Melting of ferrous metals is aided by hysteresis up to the curie point and Eddy currents Curie temperature - Wikipedia
Copper loses
Winding configuration and circular mil area / wire gauge Star or Delta - briefly delta wound is our stator which is designed for current, that is line current is 1.73 times the phase current--Star or Y connected is designed for voltage, phase current and line current are the same , line voltage is 1.73 times phase voltage -this configuration is common on all China wound knock off replacement Versys stators, the reason is the number of turns is less, if done properly this would be a viable way of increased power on the Versys stator, I would assume I could get possibly 10% more power out, by reducing turns , a small detail here, the winding on the Versys Delta is 18 gauge single conductor with 2 conductors on each line delta connected. The China stators use the same 18 gauge wire which is incorrect ,( several times during my motor shop career we converted a winding from Star to Delta, in some cases it was due to the slot size and difficulty in winding, we had a engineering access to confirm our calculations , generally the china stators should be 15 gauge copper, not 18 gauge)
Winding with a 15 gauge magnet wire would be difficult!!
Ways of getting more wattage;
Convert to a series regulator-- this is a round about way, however if the stator is 100% loaded at or above 3500 RPM ,it is also running at a high temperature, the hotter the copper winding, the greater is the resistance and the greater is the losses Copper loss - Wikipedia , a series regulator will reduce this loss for short time use, also a series regulator reduces voltage out to 14.2 VDC --A quick explanation here , 330 watts is 23.23 amp at 14.2 or 22 amp at 15 VDC or 1.23A X 15= 18.45 watts difference.
RPM /Saturation --partially covered before, roughly between 3500 and 4000 RPM is maximum output, anything above this results in no real change, in fact , at or above 10,000 RPM could cause the series regulator to stop working, as the switching frequency exceeds the ability to track the design of the gate pulse electronics.

Best way of gaining output is to convert all lighting to quality LED lighting, it is important to compare lumen output to actual wattage, many LED sources lack technical data , I posted a photo of my SafeGo led, both lumen , wattage and current were found on the label, I confirmed this using a voltmeter and ammeter .
Sorry run out of time, if there is interest I will carry on , another day. Today it is warming up above 14'C --got to go
 

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