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Hello, from what I hear alot of people have their speedo out but is there a cheep fix for it? Mine is out by about 10-11 km/h at 110 km/h and about 7 at 60 km/h. If you bring it in are they able to adjust it? How much to they typically charge? Or is there any other ways of getting it more accurate?

Thanks
 

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There are electronic calibration gizmos that can be had for about $100 that insert into the wiring harness (pretty much plug and play from the sales literature) which you then calibrate against a good source like a GPS or a dyno. Or just use the speedometer on a GPS.
 

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The problem is that the speedo is wrong but he distance is right. If you check it against the GPS you can double check that. So if you use the sprocket correction you may correct the speedo but not the tach. Have fun figuring that one out.
 

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The problem is that the speedo is wrong but he distance is right. If you check it against the GPS you can double check that. So if you use the sprocket correction you may correct the speedo but not the tach. Have fun figuring that one out.
:confused::confused::thanx:

:cheers:
 

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So - after comparing the OE speedo to my GPS, it's about 5mph off (too fast) at 40-50 then creeps to 7-8mph off @ 70. It only gets worse as the speed increases.

Other than new sprockets or keeping my GPS attached all the time, any other solutions?

Can this be fixed with a software or firmware update? Is it a mechanical issue? Sensor problem?
 

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Do nothing and thank the speedo error for keeping you from getting a speeding ticket :). The speedo error is between 8% and 9% therefore the changes in the absolute speed error.
 

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Figure out how much (%) its off and remember that. My Old BMW is 11%. On my 09 KLX, 70 mph indicated was 65 mph by a GPS. 7%.

My '11 V is right on or fast by 1 mph. Stock everything.

I also did a measured mile. I passed the sign by a few hundred feet before it clicked over to 1.0 miles. Next time I will pace off how far past the sign.

David
 

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Can this be fixed with a software or firmware update? Is it a mechanical issue? Sensor problem?
Clearly Kawasaki's conversion constant from rotations of the front sprocket to speed is inaccurate. It seems that many motorcycles suffer from this design feature - presumably to keep squids' speeds down. Clearly someone is willing to offer a solution to the problem in the form of speedo "healers". Unfortunately for $114 is is substantially more expensive than a new rear sprocket of the 44 or, in my case, the 43 tooth variety. (I really like my new sprocket at interstate speeds, but your mileage may vary.)
 

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You change sprockets/final drive ratios to improve acceleration or alter cruising/top end RPMs, etc. Changing them to simply calibrate a speedometer or odometer is absurd!

AFAIK, all the electronic re-calibration devices effect the speedometer & odometer simultaneously — and personally, I would rather have an accurate odometer (for the purposes of calculating MPG & maintenance intervals, etc.) than an accurate speedometer (which I could hardly care less about).
.
 

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This is a great forum, I originally changed the front sprocket to correct the speedo, I got lucky and found a rubber dampened 16T Kawasaki on Ebay for $25. Both my GPS and speedo are EXACTLY the same, the reason to change was in most cases I want to ride at or exceed the posted speed, and I don't always have the GPS on the bike. Now that I have over 10,000 on the sprocket, I don't really care that the speed is bang on, I like the fact I can do 100KM/H in second, cruising @ 100KM/H @ just under 5000 RPM in 6 . If you need a accurate mileage for fuel calculation and own a GPS, do what I do, reset your GPS before you leave and use the mileage on it. Never got a speeding ticket from having a odometer error.:goodluck:
 

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... Never got a speeding ticket from having a odometer error.:goodluck:
Well, I can’t fault your logic there but FWIW, over the 43 years that I’ve been driving, I’ve had my share of speeding tickets — and I think I may have gotten somebody else’s share too :D — but I never got one because I didn’t know I was speeding ;)

:cheers:
.
 

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In my case I had changed to a 44 tooth a while back for performance that I prefer but just yesterday I mounted the GPS out of curiosity to check the speedo and it is now bang on. GPS reads 1 KPH over the speedometer.
 

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You change sprockets/final drive ratios to improve acceleration or alter cruising/top end RPMs, etc. Changing them to simply calibrate a speedometer or odometer is absurd!
Absurd is relative. I can point to posts where forum members talk about changing their synthetic oil every 600 miles and where someone thinks that the fuel tank needs baffles to stop the sloshing around that is noticed when stopped at a traffic light. Many consider the Thermo-Bob that I have installed on my bike absurd.

It is simply the case that installing a new rear sprocket is a cheaper solution to the problem. I did not make the change in order to correct my speedometer, but that is not to say that that is not a perfectly reasonable thing to do.

The biggest problem in my case was the transition to the new sprocket. With the original gearing I would always travel a 66 mph indicated when I wanted to go ~60 mph actual. Then I needed to unlearn that conversion when I got the new sprockets.
 

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We have a choice.

Deal with the speedometer.

Change the gearing as a patch for an inaccurate speedo.

Buy a speedo healer.

I think that the cost of a sprocket being less than a speedo healer is a pretty poor excuse, but do as you wish.

I gear the bike for MY riding style which happens to be spot on the way it was shipped. I can deal with the speedo if its off.

Changing the gearing to deal with the speedo, kind of like tuning your suspension for 10% of the riding conditions.

I do change my oil every 2,000 miles :) I also use cheapo (still to spec) oil and filters. They cost me less than $12.00 per oil change.

to each his own.

David still smiling from ear to ear on my V :)

I was sitting in court when I was in college (30 years ago) with a speeding ticket for 85 in a 55. The guy in front of me had a note saying his speedo was off thinking he would get out of the ticket. Judge said (paraphrased, its been a long time) "I don't care if its off, you go by things faster like phone poles. I can tell just by looking out the window I am gong too fast" He got a fine just like the rest of us.

I had an attorney. Cost me $150.00 plus the same for the attorney fee. I have not had a speeding ticket since.
 

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Speedometers are required by law to display exactly right, or at most 10% too much. Therefore, most companies make them off 5% quick.

I've a speedohealer gizmo installed on my Versys, set to -7.4%, so I can fully use the speed limits. And I don't care about -7.4% on the tachometer, 7.4% rarer inspections, or the 7.4% higher calculated fuel use.
 
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