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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know that many riders have shiny, modern garages with all the latest tools and toys. Mine is definitely not like that and that's how I like it.

Mine is a stand-alone 65 plus-year-old typical farm garage. The 2x4 studs are a full 2" by 4", the walls are old pine boards, it smells of an old building, used oil and motorcycles. A wonderful scent, especially when a recently ridden Versys is cooling off. Sometimes the tank vent sings the happy tune.

I recently did a clean and organize job on it. My metal scrapper guy picked up a load and useless crap was evicted. It's a two car garage, so I put all the outdoor tools on one side and mechanical on the other. The best accessory is the bike lift.

I am able to store my SUV, riding lawn mower, two motorcycles and a large BBQ indoors. I can get any one of those items in and out without moving anything else out of the way. Friend John has a two-and-a-half car garage. They have three vehicles, all parked outside. He has to move things to get his KLR in and out. Their nice Toyota Solara needs a paint job due to sun fade.

I vowed never to have such a situation. Some people have too many possessions.
 

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As you can see, I am from the other persuasion; "It is impossible to have too many tools. " Yeah, I am a tool junky. Most of these tools are Craigslist finds that I got for cheap. Since I am retired, my shop is my daytime home. And I love being here tinkering and making stuff

Randy

https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=2921&pictureid=28971
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Discussion Starter #5
Randy, that's a full blown machine shop in my view, not a garage!:surprise:
But a very nice shop it is, amazing equipment. I wouldn't have a clue how to use most of it.:grin2:
Thanks for showing us yours.:wink2:
 

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Wow

As you can see, I am from the other persuasion; "It is impossible to have too many tools. " Yeah, I am a tool junky. Most of these tools are Craigslist finds that I got for cheap. Since I am retired, my shop is my daytime home. And I love being here tinkering and making stuff

Randy

https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=2921&pictureid=28971
https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/album.php?albumid=2921&pictureid=28977
https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/album/thumb/28/1c7341074b4d3af0785daf0dd8ddff6c_28973.jpg?dl=1559603883
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Well I can say I know how to use most of your stuff, much of what I see is not the residential home repair shop variety but more like industrial, just curious, what do you have for a power sevice to this shop, first thing I noticed is the Miller welder, you have single phase or 3 phase? Looks like a band saw, drill press, mig, tig,metal turning lathe,not sure if that is a small vertical milling machine, belt sander. My guess is you have a plasma arc for one of those.

Impressive, and like Smiley said, that ain't no garage that's a shop
 

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The shop has 200 amp single phase service. Also hidden away is a rotary phase converter, 2 variable frequency drives and a 600-volt step-up transformer. Since no more than 2 devices operate at the same time, the service is sufficient. Technically it is a four-car garage, but it houses no motor vehicles unless they are being repaired. To make things comfortable it has AC and forced air natural gas heat. It also has a 22kw standby generator for storm season. I do like my tools B-)

Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Looks good, Tom. I like the wood walls and shelving, so much warmer looking than drywall.

Keep them coming riders, show us your garage man cave.:thumb:
 

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my "custom" shop a few (nine) years back

When I lived in Didsbury, Alberta, I had an architect design a shop for me, then added it to our house. It had a 40' x 34' footprint c/w a mezzanine that had a 28' x 11.5' of usable storage, heated floors, 220v for welder, air compressor, a 3300 cu ft/minute exhaust fan, plus a FOUR speaker sound system. I also had another 'garage-door' to the back yard.

These pics are what I set-up for the realtor to sell the house, and I STILL miss that shop! The 14' workbench was welded from 1" square tubing w/ a sheared 1/4" steel top. In this pic - the garage is on the left



and this shows the mezzanine and work-bench area, pic taken from the door to the original two-car garage



while these were taken from some vantage points, including the stairs to the mezzanine.





The "interesting" stuff was rolled into the back yard while I took the pics.
 

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. Friend John has a two-and-a-half car garage. They have three vehicles, all parked outside. He has to move things to get his KLR in and out. Their nice Toyota Solara needs a paint job due to sun fade.

I vowed never to have such a situation. Some people have too many possessions.
Reminds me of a George Carlin skit.



Not sure if it is in this video, but he mentions having stuff worth hundreds of dollars in the garage while cars worth thousands of dollars sit outside.
 

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When I lived in Didsbury, Alberta, I had an architect design a shop for me, then added it to our house. It had a 40' x 34' footprint c/w a mezzanine that had a 28' x 11.5' of usable storage, heated floors, 220v for welder, air compressor, a 3300 cu ft/minute exhaust fan, plus a FOUR speaker sound system. I also had another 'garage-door' to the back yard.

These pics are what I set-up for the realtor to sell the house, and I STILL miss that shop! The 14' workbench was welded from 1" square tubing w/ a sheared 1/4" steel top. In this pic - the garage is on the left



and this shows the mezzanine and work-bench area from the door to the original two-car garage



while these were taken from some vantage points, including the stairs to the mezzanine.





The "interesting" stuff was rolled into the back yard while I took the pics.
I knew you had to be well off to be living in the states and up north, but I didn't know how well off until you showed these photos. Dayum!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The first "garage" I worked in was a basement in another farmhouse. It had an outside stair entry, the old style kind with a lid that covered the stairs and hinged sideways to access.

The ceiling was maybe 5" 8" high, I was 6' 3" plus tall. I spent a winter down there rebuilding a Norton kneeling on the concrete floor.

Young and tough, who needs knee pads? Turns out that I did. In the spring I could hardly walk and I had a very sore neck and head. The neck from walking hunched over, the head from constantly banging into the ceiling studs. A hardhat might have been useful too.

After that experience, it is a joy to work in a new, old-time garage. But no more kneeling for me- I have a bike lift. I also have kneepads and, somewhere around here there's a hardhat too.

I'll be adding a front wheel chock soon (on sale at Princess Auto $60), bolted to the lift. Handy for bikes with no centre stand or swingarm spools to accommodate a paddock stand. Safer than rolling the bike onto the lift and putting the side stand down, plus the bike is vertical.

A lift also works very well for taking the front wheel off my V. Here's how I do it:

-run front wheel up the ramp onto the lift

-two ratchet straps are hooked to a chain around the centre support ceiling beam

-feed straps through a gap in the fairing, hook to the lower triple clamp, one per side

-raise the lift in steps, tightening straps at each step until the desired height is reached

-remove brake callipers, bungee cord them out of the way

-lower the lift, pull the loosened axle and remove the wheel

Faster and easier than it sounds and safer with another person to help. I also use a paddock stand on the Versys, it stabilizes the bike vertically and it rolls on the floor as the bike raises. I'll take photos the next time I change the front tire.

With apologies for highjacking my own thread.:wink2:
 

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Most of the bike storage and work happens in this little man cave which is a section of the walk-out basement.
There's a 46" door, so pretty easy to get most bikes in/out easily.
Climate controlled, of course.
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.
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I knew you had to be well off to be living in the states and up north, but I didn't know how well off until you showed these photos. Dayum!
Here's what I "rolled" into the back yard::wink2:



 
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