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I have my first 100m and my saddle fears wear confirmed, the saddle is to low and narrow on the front and after 30 minutes half of my me is riding on the tank (ouch).

Being a do-it-yourself kind of guy I went ahead and put some pad.

Check it out.

http://javierisassi.googlepages.com/kawasakiversysseatmod

I just did it today so I don't know if it works yet. I'll post my results here and on the site. :thumb:
 

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The seat was suffocating the boys so something had to be done quickly. I removed the cover and using a grinder dished out a depression for both buttocks.

IMG]http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j97/tallgagent/P7130004.jpg[/IMG]

Well, it wasn't enough so I lowered the seat foam about an inch. That made it much more comfy and no more feeling like I was sliding towards the gas tank.

In order to get the boys some air I added a layer of "Nu Foam" premium densified batting that I purchased at Joann's Fabrics.

The end result is a much more comfortable seat and ride. Unfortunately, there are some lines in the cover now, but as soon as I find some breathable smoothing foam I'll get rid of those.

 

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I was going to place this in the other thread, but this seems more current. I too modified the foam in my seat. Using an electric carving knife (the kind you use at Thansksgiving on the bird!), I carved out the section I wished to replace. I then placed the very dense blue foam (camping/sleeping mat from WalMart-about $5.00), and then the memory foam over that (memory foam pillow cut to size from WalMart-about $20.00). I shaved the memory foam from front to back to allow fuller thickness (about 3") in the front, and less in the back (about 1-1/2"). I am very pleased with the modified seat, and have about 700 miles on it, both commuting and a long Sunday ride of several hours. All complete, I'd say the modification cost me less than $30.00 including tax. Not perfect, but pretty darn comfortable compared to what perfect costs!!! I would like to recover the seat with one of the aftermarket seat skin company's products for a more appealing cover.

After these photos were taken, I also did the seat-raising mod on the hardware beneath the seat. That has added to the comfort a bit, but the foam had more impact.

Thanks for looking.
 

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Thanks Troop, I couldn't find it. At any rate, I should probably add that I did the double layer and a little thicker than some may want because I'm probably what you'd call on the large side. I go about 6'-5" and 240 lbs. Those of you who are normal human-sized may want to cut the thickness down a bit or you'll be reaching for the pavement on your toes!

I should also add that I used the 3M adhesive #90 as discussed in another thread.
 

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This may have already been done, but I feel I need to share so here goes.....


So this story started about a month ago when I decided I wanted the Versys. I had just sold my 2007 Ninja 250 because I wanted a more upright riding position and the offer was good. The dealer here didn't have the bikes set up to test ride, so I went in and sat on it a few times, loved the positioning, and decided that this was the machine for me.





The day I got "Verbal" (my wife named him...don't mess with her), I rode him for 55 miles and realized that I had just sunk $7000 into a machine that had a horrible seat! 55 miles and my tailbone felt like it's about to explode? The horrid frontal wedgie? Sliding forward whenever braking?? What is this??!!! This couldn't be happening! This must be changed asap or my wife is gonna kick my respective backside for spending our money on a bike that is too uncomfortable to ride. I thought "I'm gonna change this without buying a custom seat and without spending more than 25 bucks."

After pouring through all the posts about seat modification, I built my courage up and decided to take a stab at modifying the seat. I gathered my tools, removed the staples and pulled the seat cover back and then I froze. Was I about to mutilate my seat? What if I mess it up? Is this going to be worse?...ad infinitum...

I balked...

I DIDN'T want to start cutting with my electric knife OR start sanding with my orbital sander. My guts went out the door with the morning trash....so I sat...

and I pondered...

and I waited for the epiphany that often comes when I sit still and concentrate on something hard enough...(no punch line needed)

As I sat there and looked the seat over, i thought about how I could do this without sanding, cutting, or using the cool "nose raising with a bracket" technique....

And then it hit me! If I could peel the seat cushion away from the plastic seat base, then I could build the seat up from the underside of the cushion on the plastic seat base without destroying my seat. SURE ENOUGH, the seat cushion was just glued at the edges that folded over the plastic and nowhere else. With a little gentle prying, my seat cushion came off nearly clean!







I set the cushion aside and rolled out an old $14.00 yoga mat to use as my underpadding.





This is the only material I used in the seat. I cut pieces from the mat with a set of scissors, shaped them around the nose and center of the seat in the areas that needed to be raised, and glued them to the plastic base with a can of $4.50 spray adhesive.







Notice I didn't take any special care in grinding the yoga mat, and I just applied the glue to one side of each layer so I could peel off cleanly if any modifications are needed.. The seat cushion covers most of it.

Then I placed the seat cushion back on top and stapled the seat cover back down with SHORT staples ($3.00) The long ones stick through and poke the nether regions!










It has a couple of wrinkles, but they are barely noticeable!

The ultimate test was a ride, so I took it out last night and rode for about 15 miles, and they were the best 15 miles ever! I broke hard to test the slide and frontal wedgie factor, I hit some twisties to ensure I could move around on the seat easily, and I hit some bumpy roads to see how well it stood up to the "giblet jostling" test! IT WORKED! IT WORKED WELL! Of course, I need to put some real miles on it to test the endurance level, but I can tell you that even short trips into town were turning uncomfortable. After last nights mod, I want to live on my Versys! WOOOHOOO!

Total Cost: $21.50

$14.00 for the yoga mat
$ 4.50 for the spray adhesive
$ 3.00 for the staples
Arrow Heavy Duty Stapler (in garage)
Small flathead screwdriver (to pry staples out)
Hammer (to ensure the staples are secure)
Kitchen scissors (don't tell my wife)

The cost is actually quite a bit less less considering I still have half of a yoga mat, 90% of the staples, and over 1/2 a can of spray glue left!


On another note....I put the spray adhesive in the closet next to the spray starch. This morning whilst ironing, I grabbed the wrong can and glued the iron to my shirt. I don't have a picture.....
 

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This may have already been done, but I feel I need to share so here goes.....


So this story started about a month ago when I decided I wanted the Versys. I had just sold my 2007 Ninja 250 because I wanted a more upright riding position and the offer was good. The dealer here didn't have the bikes set up to test ride, so I went in and sat on it a few times, loved the positioning, and decided that this was the machine for me.





The day I got "Verbal" (my wife named him...don't mess with her), I rode him for 55 miles and realized that I had just sunk $7000 into a machine that had a horrible seat! 55 miles and my tailbone felt like it's about to explode? The horrid frontal wedgie? Sliding forward whenever braking?? What is this??!!! This couldn't be happening! This must be changed asap or my wife is gonna kick my respective backside for spending our money on a bike that is too uncomfortable to ride. I thought "I'm gonna change this without buying a custom seat and without spending more than 25 bucks."

After pouring through all the posts about seat modification, I built my courage up and decided to take a stab at modifying the seat. I gathered my tools, removed the staples and pulled the seat cover back and then I froze. Was I about to mutilate my seat? What if I mess it up? Is this going to be worse?...ad infinitum...

I balked...

I DIDN'T want to start cutting with my electric knife OR start sanding with my orbital sander. My guts went out the door with the morning trash....so I sat...

and I pondered...

and I waited for the epiphany that often comes when I sit still and concentrate on something hard enough...(no punch line needed)

As I sat there and looked the seat over, i thought about how I could do this without sanding, cutting, or using the cool "nose raising with a bracket" technique....

And then it hit me! If I could peel the seat cushion away from the plastic seat base, then I could build the seat up from the underside of the cushion on the plastic seat base without destroying my seat. SURE ENOUGH, the seat cushion was just glued at the edges that folded over the plastic and nowhere else. With a little gentle prying, my seat cushion came off nearly clean!







I set the cushion aside and rolled out an old $14.00 yoga mat to use as my underpadding.





This is the only material I used in the seat. I cut pieces from the mat with a set of scissors, shaped them around the nose and center of the seat in the areas that needed to be raised, and glued them to the plastic base with a can of $4.50 spray adhesive.







Notice I didn't take any special care in grinding the yoga mat, and I just applied the glue to one side of each layer so I could peel off cleanly if any modifications are needed.. The seat cushion covers most of it.

Then I placed the seat cushion back on top and stapled the seat cover back down with SHORT staples ($3.00) The long ones stick through and poke the nether regions!










It has a couple of wrinkles, but they are barely noticeable!

The ultimate test was a ride, so I took it out last night and rode for about 15 miles, and they were the best 15 miles ever! I broke hard to test the slide and frontal wedgie factor, I hit some twisties to ensure I could move around on the seat easily, and I hit some bumpy roads to see how well it stood up to the "giblet jostling" test! IT WORKED! IT WORKED WELL! Of course, I need to put some real miles on it to test the endurance level, but I can tell you that even short trips into town were turning uncomfortable. After last nights mod, I want to live on my Versys! WOOOHOOO!

Total Cost: $21.50

$14.00 for the yoga mat
$ 4.50 for the spray adhesive
$ 3.00 for the staples
Arrow Heavy Duty Stapler (in garage)
Small flathead screwdriver (to pry staples out)
Hammer (to ensure the staples are secure)
Kitchen scissors (don't tell my wife)

The cost is actually quite a bit less less considering I still have half of a yoga mat, 90% of the staples, and over 1/2 a can of spray glue left!


On another note....I put the spray adhesive in the closet next to the spray starch. This morning whilst ironing, I grabbed the wrong can and glued the iron to my shirt. I don't have a picture.....
 

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shed.head

Nicely done! Definitely gonna give it a shot.

Do you think that you could have peeled the cover on back over the "hump" and trimmed it back a little? I sure could use a little more room to the rear.

Hey Spklbuk,

What you will have to do is remove the staples from the back of the seat and pull the cover forwards toward the front of the seat. Here is why.

Your seat has a seam between the back and front cushion of the seat.



This seam is pulled tight with strings that go through the seat and to the bottom where they are wrapped around plastic posts and then stapled.



Now these strings are really tight, so messing with them would probably mess with the tightness of the seat. Even if you removed them and then put them back, I think it would be too difficult to get them tight again after removal.


So in my opinion, I believe you could remove some foam from the back hump but I think you would have to go in from behind!
 

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shed.head

Nicely done! Definitely gonna give it a shot.

Do you think that you could have peeled the cover on back over the "hump" and trimmed it back a little? I sure could use a little more room to the rear.

Hey Spklbuk,

What you will have to do is remove the staples from the back of the seat and pull the cover forwards toward the front of the seat. Here is why.

Your seat has a seam between the back and front cushion of the seat.



This seam is pulled tight with strings that go through the seat and to the bottom where they are wrapped around plastic posts and then stapled.



Now these strings are really tight, so messing with them would probably mess with the tightness of the seat. Even if you removed them and then put them back, I think it would be too difficult to get them tight again after removal.


So in my opinion, I believe you could remove some foam from the back hump but I think you would have to go in from behind!
 

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I modified my seat also. I removed the staples from the front back past the hump. As stated, there is just a very small amount of glue at the very front and removing the front foam is very easy. I sanded the back down with an angle grinder and then hand sanded. Now here is the trick. After removing about a half inch from the back part of the seat, if you do not tighten the bar that goes across under the seat, the cover will not be as tight and not look as good as before. I found that this was an easy task also. I used a 14 gauge solid copper wire striped of its insulation (typical house wiring) and bend a hook in one end and twisted the other end into a nice handle. The bar that goes under the seat is plastic and can be bent quit a bit. I pushed the hooked end of the wire trough from the bottom over the plastic bar and was now able to exert enough pressure to bend the bar enough that I could wrap the thread around the little seat post (pin?) to tighten it without having to cut or change anything there. After re-stapling (I have never found an electric staple gun that has enough power for this job, always use an air staple gun) the seat looks stock, not one wrinkle, and ir WORKS. Have rode about 100 miles with it now and the results made this into one of the best non-after market seats I have ever sat on.
 

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I modified my seat also. I removed the staples from the front back past the hump. As stated, there is just a very small amount of glue at the very front and removing the front foam is very easy. I sanded the back down with an angle grinder and then hand sanded. Now here is the trick. After removing about a half inch from the back part of the seat, if you do not tighten the bar that goes across under the seat, the cover will not be as tight and not look as good as before. I found that this was an easy task also. I used a 14 gauge solid copper wire striped of its insulation (typical house wiring) and bend a hook in one end and twisted the other end into a nice handle. The bar that goes under the seat is plastic and can be bent quit a bit. I pushed the hooked end of the wire trough from the bottom over the plastic bar and was now able to exert enough pressure to bend the bar enough that I could wrap the thread around the little seat post (pin?) to tighten it without having to cut or change anything there. After re-stapling (I have never found an electric staple gun that has enough power for this job, always use an air staple gun) the seat looks stock, not one wrinkle, and ir WORKS. Have rode about 100 miles with it now and the results made this into one of the best non-after market seats I have ever sat on.
 

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I modified my seat also. I removed the staples from the front back past the hump. As stated, there is just a very small amount of glue at the very front and removing the front foam is very easy. I sanded the back down with an angle grinder and then hand sanded. Now here is the trick. After removing about a half inch from the back part of the seat, if you do not tighten the bar that goes across under the seat, the cover will not be as tight and not look as good as before. I found that this was an easy task also. I used a 14 gauge solid copper wire striped of its insulation (typical house wiring) and bend a hook in one end and twisted the other end into a nice handle. The bar that goes under the seat is plastic and can be bent quit a bit. I pushed the hooked end of the wire trough from the bottom over the plastic bar and was now able to exert enough pressure to bend the bar enough that I could wrap the thread around the little seat post (pin?) to tighten it without having to cut or change anything there. After re-stapling (I have never found an electric staple gun that has enough power for this job, always use an air staple gun) the seat looks stock, not one wrinkle, and ir WORKS. Have rode about 100 miles with it now and the results made this into one of the best non-after market seats I have ever sat on.
Awesome Pegasus! I didn't get that deep into the seat so I didn't even know about the plastic bar that holds the cover. This will definitely help others!
 

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I modified my seat also. I removed the staples from the front back past the hump. As stated, there is just a very small amount of glue at the very front and removing the front foam is very easy. I sanded the back down with an angle grinder and then hand sanded. Now here is the trick. After removing about a half inch from the back part of the seat, if you do not tighten the bar that goes across under the seat, the cover will not be as tight and not look as good as before. I found that this was an easy task also. I used a 14 gauge solid copper wire striped of its insulation (typical house wiring) and bend a hook in one end and twisted the other end into a nice handle. The bar that goes under the seat is plastic and can be bent quit a bit. I pushed the hooked end of the wire trough from the bottom over the plastic bar and was now able to exert enough pressure to bend the bar enough that I could wrap the thread around the little seat post (pin?) to tighten it without having to cut or change anything there. After re-stapling (I have never found an electric staple gun that has enough power for this job, always use an air staple gun) the seat looks stock, not one wrinkle, and ir WORKS. Have rode about 100 miles with it now and the results made this into one of the best non-after market seats I have ever sat on.
Awesome Pegasus! I didn't get that deep into the seat so I didn't even know about the plastic bar that holds the cover. This will definitely help others!
 

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I've had my 2011 Versys for about 3 weeks. It's an amazing bike and I am really enjoying it.

However, as others have discovered, its seat has a tendency to push us riders forward into the gas tank.

The first thing I tried, as others have done, is to raise the front of the seat. This kept me from sliding forward but raised the seat height too much. It really made the bike feel different.

So, here's what worked for me.

1 - I melted about 0.25" of the seat frame plastic farther into the tubular indentations of the forward bike frame contact area (circled in the attached pictures).
2 - I removed about 0.40" of the two mid frame posts (shown by the arrows in the attached pictures).

I did the melting part by heating up a 3/4" copper pipe (cut to the proper length) and pushed it into the area circled in the pictures. I inserted a dowel into the pipe to give me something to push down with and wore thick gloves as I was doing it. I used a propane torch to get the pipe hot - really hot - and then brought the pipe/dowel over to the seat. See the attached pictures.

Now, the seat is neutral. I don't slide forward (on level ground) and it feels good.

Bob
 

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There's a local cat here in San Antonio named Tony who has a re-upholstering business. He's done stock seat modifications for my bike in the past, and I went back to him so that he could fix this seat. He had already modified stock V seats before for other customers, so he already knew about how most of us dislike the forward slope of the seat. The last color-matched seat job he did for me lasted years and didn't fade, fall apart or get worn down. He also uses some kind of proprietary seat foam that's very comfortable on long rides when he fixes or modifies seats. He added about 2" of soft foam for me and centered my butt in the seat. Here are the before and after pics....and this job was done in only one day:

Before:
View attachment 13157 View attachment 13158


After:
View attachment 13159 View attachment 13160 View attachment 13161 View attachment 13162 View attachment 13163

I normally don't shill for anything or anyone, but Tony is the real deal. He's not paying me nor am I getting a cut of any future business....it's just that this guy is that good with his seats. Other people have been mailing stock seats for him to fix, so it can be done. Here's his website (you need Flash) http://www.carservicesinc.com/pages/gallery.html. The pictures of the red Honda Shadow Sabre on page 12 was the bike I sold to get my V when I first bought it in 2008. Hope this helps someone who didn't want to spend $4-500 bucks on an aftermarket seat with no customization. And by the way...OMG the seat feels so much better, and looks trick too! Cheers!
 

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To add to this, I'm a short rider (5'8"), so I REALLY don't want to add any height if possible!
I would not recommend a Seat Concept for you. I really like my SC; at 6"2" with 34" inseam it is perfect (also have lower pegs) but it is definitely not for your stature. I would explore other options including the threads on flattening the stock seat profile because after all it seems to me, and to most others, that the problem is the forward slope of the stock seat, plus maybe some foam firmness incompatibility with the arse region.

Perhaps someone here has a suggestion for an aftermarket seat that is no taller than stock? Otherwise explore the many threads previously posted.
 

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Tenover,
I'm 5' 8", 29" inseam, 180 lbs; and have tried dozens of combinations to get a more comfortable and low seat. I finally found a great solution, with an easy seat-mod plus the AirHawk R cushion. I described it in another thread, but the solution is so simple, I'll just describe it again.

First, order an AirHawk R seat cushion ($160). When it arrives, blow it up (by mouth is fine) then leave the air-**** open and let all the excess air out. When stable, tighten the plug so no more air can escape.

Next, remove the staples from the front half of the seat. Pull the cover back and remove all the stock foam - it will just peel away. Next, using either the stock foam or some other firm foam, cut a 2" thick piece to fit the front four inches of the seat - to raise it up to stop the slide forward. Taper it so that it flows into the seat base. Next pull the cover back in place, but do not staple it yet. Place the AirHawk R cushion on top, in the middle of where you'll sit. Put the bike on a rear stand, place the AirHawk R cushion on the bike. Climb on and sit. See how it feels. If it doesn't feel right, analyze what it needs (for example, more/less cushion in front, etc). Move the AirHawk cushion forward and backward till you like how it feels. Once it seems to fit your butt properly, remove the AirHawk R cushion, pull the cover tightly and staple back in place. Works well to pull each side in place with a couple of staples and slowly work your way forward, pulling the cover then stapling. If a problem occurs, remove some staples and start over.

When the cover is stapled in place, place the AirHawk R cushion where you think it should go, sit on it again and put the straps in place. Then turn the seat over and put a staple in each strap to hold them in place and up in the seat bottom.

If there's any doubt about comfort, take the bike for a little ride. As you move around, the air will move and give support to whatever portion of your butt is applying the most pressure.

I found this arrangement to be very comfortable. I can now ride long enough that my brain and back get too tired to ride, while my butt is still ready to go. I have a personal limit of two hours of riding without a safety rest stop.

However, I did find that, initially, my butt was a little tender from my prior riding. So, give your butt a day or two to rest before starting this project. This entire job can be done in a couple of hours, if you have the AirHawk R cushion, and a staple gun and staples before starting.

BTW, the cushion has an unusual feeling as you move around. It seems to move around under you. In fact, that seems to be the reason it works. It provides the most support under the portion of your butt that's pressing hardest. Be patient, and give it a thorough test. Worst case, you hate it; replace the stock foam and sell the cushion. If your like me, the cushion will rate up like Michelin PR3 tires, that had a huge positive impact on how I view my V (I have the "green" 09V). Always fast, and now has a very comfortable seat. BTW, I also increased the comfort by changing springs and shock. That's another story, if you're interested.

Good Luck!
 

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I ran a Sargent saddle for a season. Really really enjoyed it!
Sold it to a member on here for what I got it for. The Sargent saddle raises you up a bit height wise. Didn't bother me in the slightest. But I really liked my stock modded saddle as well.

Had to consolidate the moto parts, and the Sargent was easier to sell than the stock saddle so it had to go. Now I rock my stock saddle with memory foam insert with my invaluable Alaskan Sheep Skin pad. (It has been on every bike that I've owned for the last 3 years)


If you are thinking about picking up a new saddle, try the sheep skin pad first.
You will not regret it! It is the best upgrade I have done to any of my bikes except suspension work.

Versys Sheep Skin Pad

Picture of the "Natural long hair" sheep skin pad on my V


You will also get, "Wtf is that? Got a buffalo on that thing?" comments all the time. Hahaha
 

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one more idea ?

I have an 09 with the OEM standard seat.

This seat has slowly been taking its toll. Mostly been doing short rides <100 miles. Commuting and such.

Yesterday I went out specifically to see what the tank range is with mixed riding. (For what it was worth I came back with 207 on the OD, one LED bar left and no Low Fuel Light.)

The glaring seat issue presented itself around 130-150 miles. My tailbone felt like I had been skateboarding again and landed on it. Really tender even after getting back to my desk chair for the remainder of the day.

I still couldn't sit on the bike comfortably today.

Not cool.

So, I started reading through the rather diverse solution list (aside from purchasing a new/different seat) here on the KV Forum.

Here is what I landed on.

-Not wanting to elevate the seat further (5'-9" and already tip toeing).
-After seeing people minimize the middle to rear to eliminate ramping.

Here are the steps I took:

Removed front cover area and related foam. Cut out the plastic in the offending tailbone crushing area:






Belt sanded the indicated area down by about 3/4" on a flat plane:


Reapplied the foam with a little Super 90 and stapled the cover . Had to underfold a little vinyl to take up the lowered foam height.

Feels much better. Definitely does not aggravate the bruised tailbone. AND, the ramping is totally gone. Actually feels a little cupped. (Hopefully that doesn't come back to bite me in the butt.)

I am almost of the opinion that most of the forward "ramping" is being caused by the tail bone pivoting on the plastic which I removed.

If I wasn't also trying to lose a bit of height I would have just used a 4" hole saw to cut the plastic from below/underside without removing cover.

Ride safe...and comfortable :D

I'll post another one tank trip review asap.
 
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