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A little more info. If you wired the regulator directly from the stator , you don't need the relay. The connector that went from the stator into the main harness has a trigger wire. Very easy to correct. You can use the horn as a trigger for the headlight. It is live the instant the key is on. One if the 3 phase wires is tapped and triggers the headlight relay.
Yes, i know.
I,ve used the headlight as trigger BEFORE the stator goes down...
i think ther's somenthing thant go back from the relay to the relay box through the headlight cables... that's possible?
 

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Discussion Starter · #144 ·
Followed your drawing. OLD Cables , is that connected to the original connectors and harness ? I ask because you show direct connections to the battery from the regulator, with the negative output going through the 30 amp relay.
I am going to comment on this power connection, others have done it this way. The original wiring the regulator output goes to the load side of the main 30 amp fuse, this same point is the primary distribution of current from the stator / regulator output. So when the stator isn't producing power ( stall ) , the current travels through the 30 amp fuse to the key switch and all other switched and fixed loads. There is a 10 or 12 gauge wire coming from the battery and tied into this circuit. If you connected as in the drawing, all the current now needs to pass through that 10 or 12 gauge wire from the battery to the main fuse. So now the current for everything needs to pass through that 30 amp fuse from the battery.

Explanation #2 I will call the point where the + regulator is connected to the 30 amp main fuse as point A . The side of the 30 amp fuse that goes to the battery B Say the motorcycle is drawing 18 amp and the battery is charging at 6 amp. Original wiring at point A we have 18 amp going to main distribution and B we have 6 amp. Now your wiring , regulator at the battery, A & B are now 18 amp. Under original wiring the 18 amp going to A & B would only happen if you stalled the engine. B only carries the current difference between what is needed and what the stator puts out, that 30 amp fuse rarely has more than 6 amp going through it.

And the only known series regulator is the SH775BA


 

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Followed your drawing. OLD Cables , is that connected to the original connectors and harness ? I ask because you show direct connections to the battery from the regulator, with the negative output going through the 30 amp relay.
I am going to comment on this power connection, others have done it this way. The original wiring the regulator output goes to the load side of the main 30 amp fuse, this same point is the primary distribution of current from the stator / regulator output. So when the stator isn't producing power ( stall ) , the current travels through the 30 amp fuse to the key switch and all other switched and fixed loads. There is a 10 or 12 gauge wire coming from the battery and tied into this circuit. If you connected as in the drawing, all the current now needs to pass through that 10 or 12 gauge wire from the battery to the main fuse. So now the current for everything needs to pass through that 30 amp fuse from the battery.

Explanation #2 I will call the point where the + regulator is connected to the 30 amp main fuse as point A . The side of the 30 amp fuse that goes to the battery B Say the motorcycle is drawing 18 amp and the battery is charging at 6 amp. Original wiring at point A we have 18 amp going to main distribution and B we have 6 amp. Now your wiring , regulator at the battery, A & B are now 18 amp. Under original wiring the 18 amp going to A & B would only happen if you stalled the engine. B only carries the current difference between what is needed and what the stator puts out, that 30 amp fuse rarely has more than 6 amp going through it.

And the only known series regulator is the SH775BA


I can't understand what you're talking about ..
I've used only the old cables for the 3 phases..I've used new cable for the positive and negative output of the regulator....
I've used a fuse through the positive line of the regulator, just for safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #146 ·
I can't understand what you're talking about ..
I've used only the old cables for the 3 phases..I've used new cable for the positive and negative output of the regulator....
I've used a fuse through the positive line of the regulator, just for safe.
So when you say you used the old cables, the 3 phase wires that went to the old regulator , go to the new one? If yes , then your headlight should come on the instant you start the bike. As to the power wires, red and black, you have installed a relay in the black ground wire, I understand that, adding a fuse on the positive is your choice. What I am trying to say, is with the output connected to your battery directly, you could blow the main 30 amp fuse. The original regulator if it were possible to put out 100 amp, it could do it as the circuit is connected directly to the main distribution and is unfused , that distribution point is the other side of the main 30 amp fuse.
I don't have time today but I will post a link on the most recent install procedure, for the 4012941 SH775BA Polaris regulator.
 

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So when you say you used the old cables, the 3 phase wires that went to the old regulator , go to the new one? If yes , then your headlight should come on the instant you start the bike. As to the power wires, red and black, you have installed a relay in the black ground wire, I understand that, adding a fuse on the positive is your choice. What I am trying to say, is with the output connected to your battery directly, you could blow the main 30 amp fuse. The original regulator if it were possible to put out 100 amp, it could do it as the circuit is connected directly to the main distribution and is unfused , that distribution point is the other side of the main 30 amp fuse.
I don't have time today but I will post a link on the most recent install procedure, for the 4012941 SH775BA Polaris regulator.
So, you're telling me that's better to use the old positive line for the regulator?
Whenever, the issue in my case is that the headlight relay (in the relay box) goes down.
I don't know why, I just use a 55w led light.
What you're thinking about it?
PS thank you so much, man! I wish offer you a drink! If I come in Canada or you come to Italy too :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #149 ·
Ok , lets solve your headlight problem first. I have a thread on using one of those 40 amp relays in cases where the relay box has the headlight relay failed. Lets do it right the first time. Also what year is your Versys ?
I will provide a link for testing the headlight relay. Basically you use a wire the horn to the 3 phase connector going into the main harness - wait for the full explanation, if your Versys is MK-1 is easiest, Mk-2 UK version with ABS is more difficult. MK-3 is really impossible at the stator connector.
 

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I've 2010 versys without ABS.
Now I've replaced the relay in the relay box and it works great.
But I don't understand why this relay goes down with just a led light on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #151 ·
I would like to see the old relay, also does the contact fail or the magnetic coil? I have never heard of anyone replacing the relay inside the relay box. Many have replaced the relay box, and I have a work around for that relay.


 

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Discussion Starter · #152 ·
Here is my most recent Polaris regulator install instructions;


And one by a member;

And the 50 amp 4016868 Polaris which I am running in my 2015 Versys , but installed on a MK-1

Polaris 4016868 MK-1 By JPD
 

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I would like to see the old relay, also does the contact fail or the magnetic coil? I have never heard of anyone replacing the relay inside the relay box. Many have replaced the relay box, and I have a work around for that relay.


here's the relay box opened, with rhe faulty relay
WhatsApp Image 2021-05-04 at 16.53.25 (2).jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2021-05-04 at 16.53.25 (1).jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2021-05-04 at 16.53.25.jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2021-05-04 at 16.54.04.jpeg
 

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Here is my most recent Polaris regulator install instructions;


And one by a member;

And the 50 amp 4016868 Polaris which I am running in my 2015 Versys , but installed on a MK-1

Polaris 4016868 MK-1 By JPD
Have you tried to just disconnect the regulator negative pole to de-energize the hedlight relay?
 

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Discussion Starter · #155 · (Edited)
Have you tried to just disconnect the regulator negative pole to de-energize the hedlight relay?
That was done on the Compufire , however keep in mind, the negative pole is a power pole, that is it carries the current.That was a challenge as the negative output was the aluminum case, fortunately my 2007 Versys regulator mounting was rubber mounted , so for about 2 years I had a relay between the regulator ground and frame ground. Then I discovered the source of the discharge as the headlight relay. History now, however you are correct, switching either positive or negative output of the regulator would work, just remember , 0.6 VDC doesn't sound like much but at 13.6 as opposed to 14.2, that makes a difference.


A little ohms law here; FYI you did a awesome job on replacing the relay box relay, many don't have the skill required to repair a printed circuit board.
Let us say the resistance of the relay contact is 0.3 ohms, voltage drop at 20 amp would be 20 X 0.3 = 0.6 volts or slightly more than half a volt, wattage would be 20 X 0.6 = 1.2 watts. Using the roughly 300 ohm headlight relay results in no loss and no room for contact failure which would result in no DC output should the contact fail on the relay installed.
 
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