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Discussion Starter · #121 ·
Shunt / Rectification / Voltage Control / Permanent Magnet / Field Strength

Thanks for info.
Would an OEM rectifier replacing the original one would improve the situation?
If I can just easily replace it and go another 40k I'd be happy. How much is a new one?

Shrinkable Sofa is available nation wide online at major retailers, a marketing campaign would make it more visible, but it's something so new, people still don't know it exists.
Still looking to license the ChainBath and Universal Backrest ;)
Have another 2 ideas in works.
I will try again, the title in this post contains Key information directly associated with Voltage Control, rectification from 3 phase AC is accomplished many ways, we hear Mos Fet , SCR , pulse width modulated and more. I will continue after I give my opinion in the second part of this quote.
Anybody has any review on this one:

https://www.rmstator.com/en_ca/products/voltage-regulator-rectifier-for-honda-trx-450-fourtrax-foreman-s-fe-fm-2002-2004-rm30422

it says it works on Versys 650 (double the price of the OEM)
RM Stator is out of Quebec Canada, they sell China Y connected stators, short explanation is they will output 330 Watts the same as the OEM Delta wound, that is were it ends . Expecting a single 18 gauge magnet wire to carry 15 amp AC as opposed to the OEM Delta wound with two 18 gauge wires to carry the same 15 amp AC, well we know which stator will fail first. There are advantages of Delta over star or Y connected, not going there , but realaise the RM Stator made in China has roughly 60% of the copper compared to OEM. From the standpoint of a rewind shop, that is a red flag. That China Stator when converting to Y connected required the wire gauge to change to 15 gauge https://mwswire.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Copper-Magnet-Wire-Data.pdf or 3260 circular mils.Do the math. I converted motor windings some times from Y to Delta, simply because the wire gauge on Delta was smaller and easier to install the windings off the winding machine.

Voltage Regulation Permanent Magnet rotating FIXED magnetic Field



Current is work done , voltage is the pressure of the system. Dealing with a fixed magnetic field, the faster the engine turns the greater is the output of the stator , I highlighted fixed because this method is only used in motorcycles , cars , trucks and everything else regulates the field strength to match the load / voltage requirements of the machine.

Electronically how a series regulator accomplishes it's task whether SCR or PWM , doesn't matter. So that fixed field strength , the permanent magnet rotor , once the RPM is sufficient, we reach a point where the output from the stator matches our total loads and that includes charge current to the battery, let me pick 2000 RPM, say we are at 14.5 volts DC, increase to 2500 RPM and we are at 15 VDC, yes I have seen this on the OEM shunt reg.. Increase from 2500 to 2800 RPM, during this transition, the shunt regulator originally had a simple 3 phase 6 diode rectifier, no electronics required to produce DC, now at the 2500 to 2800 RPM transition we are coming close to blowing headlight bulbs and doing permanent damage to our electrical system, this applies to everything electric, we have surge protectors and many other devices in everything electric. So that 2500 to 2800 RPM we have the SHUNT kick in , this is a electronically controlled variable load placed across the output of that 6 diode rectifier , resulting in the DC dropping back to 14.5 VDC.

I am going to throw some values of wattage into the mix.So I know my base load is around 170 watts with low Beam and the Denali lights etc.. So if I had a shunt regulator, that 2500 to 2800 RPM transition, the shunt would add possibly 40 watts . At 3000 RPM it would be close to 100 watts and at or above 3500 RPM very close to 150 Watts, to maintain that 14.5 VDC and prevent it from exceeding that voltage. I have done several warnings about those that have gone about reducing there base load wattage by changing out the low beam headlight to LED, also reduce continuous loads such as city lights and license plate lights, because by reducing those loads, the shunt regulator needs to have the ability of shedding a increased wattage. So let us say I managed to change my base load by 45 watts, ( license plate is 5 or 10 watts, city lights are 5 watts each and my low beam was 55 watt now 36 SafeGo ) This would change my base load to 125 watts.

Go back to the 2500 to 2800 RPM transition, that 40 watts is now + 45 = 85 watts wasted as heat, above 3500 RPM it would be 150 = 45 = 195 watts. My point is the engineers didn't design in the ability to dissipate the increase in energy.Because the magnetic field is fixed, our only means of control is by adding load to prevent a voltage increase. That 195 watts, yes that is what the stator is producing in addition to the base load of 125 watts =300 watts load on the stator!!

However along came Series regulators, much like a light dimmer technology. It rapidly switches the AC to produce full wave DC, so my base load of 170 watts at 1500 RPM is around 14 to 14.2 VDC. At 3500 RPM my base load remains very close to 170 watts and my stator produces 170 Watts. At 6000 RPM my stator is still producing 170 watts.There is no change between idle ( 1500 to 1550 , below that when above 80'F my stator can't maintain 14.2 VDC)
Extensive electronics, rapid switching, this has been perfected over time and the latest Polaris 4016868 rated at 50 amp is proof of improvements. A key point is my 2015 stator has a fixed output no matter what RPM I am at, it never sees full load unless I am running heated gear and heated grips, both at maximum, and my high beam on, think about it, with the ThermoBob , I am trying to keep the engine warm, no worries about the stator running hot or the regulator burning up and the magic smoke escaping>:).

So I ask you which stator do you think will fail first, my 2015 running with a constant 170 watt load of the maximum available output of 330 watts . Or the MK-1;MK-2;MK-3 with the OEM shunt regulator running around 300 Watts at or above 3500 RPM continuous? I hope you now understand why switching to a series regulator has several advantages including extended battery life and those watts you free up converting to LED are actually available say for a pillion heated vest.
My hope is that Kawasaki converts to series regulators on the next generation, it appears that the Ninja 100 in 2016 is a series regulator and possibly the V1000 in 2018 is a series regulator. Why I think that is because they have the same two socket regulator like the Polaris and they are made by the same company. I need someone with a 2018 V1000 to test for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #122 ·
Old Link / SCR Firing

https://www.shindengen.com/products/electro/motorcycle/reg/
Regulators, highly technical , for those who wish to know what the Polaris regulator schematic looks like or any older series regulator;

For those not sure what you are looking at, starting from the left, you have the 3 phase input wires, top will be called A, middle B and bottom C, going left to right , you will see A phase connected to a upper SCR ( Positive output ) and a Lower SCR ( negative output) you will also see A phase going to the control circuit block diagram, all 3 phases do that, that is for phase angle and firing sequence . In my install directions and some other posts I mention that a battery must be present and at east 8 VDC, simply because the control circuit has a built in reverse polarity protection and requires power from the battery to fire the gate pulses.
Notice the block diagram for the control circuit has a positive and negative connection, this is all internal but is how it fires the SCR's and also regulates the output voltage. All actual charging current flows along the very top positive line and the very bottom negative line. Notice the fuse is there to protect the battery, this is accurate as to the Versys which has a 30 amp main fuse. It is also accurate as to the Versys wiring, with the exception that the headlight relay circuit isn't shown. And yes,the regulator is live all the time, just like this drawing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #123 · (Edited)
Rectification / AC to DC



Diode it is a device that passes DC current in one direction but blocks current in reverse .

So electron flow is cathode to anode. An example I use in my brake light trigger circuit, I connect a diode across the start solenoid coil circuit. I have the cathode on the positive side and the anode on the negative side, using a diode that way is called free wheeling or noise suppression. What happens in DC , when you disconnect power from a magnetic coil, you get a collapsing field, which happens to be in reverse polarity, it took me 3 hours of tracing to figure out the headlight relay was pulling in from the collapsing field DC spike of the start solenoid.
So a practical use of a diode, ,using the drawing below, A is the headlight relay. #2 is from the 3 phase AC, when it is positive going, we get conduction from ground pin 11 through the coil , through to diodes to the positive going voltage. The next instant in time the contact of A closes, pin #3 is positive source , electrons now pass from pin 11 ground through the A coil, through the first diode, then left branch through the second diode to pin #1 and the closed side of the contact, which is what we call a latch circuit. At this point you can stall the motor, no AC to pin #2 and the headlight will still be on. [and for some is used to trigger the headlight after installing the Polaris regulator] And we know the instant the start is energized the relay will unlatch.






SCR What is it? Basically it is a switch diode, yes it rectifies AC into DC , but the forward direction needs to be turned on, or gated.

I started this thread with the intention of explaining a different way , why a shunt regulator is so damaging, yes when I start explaining even to electrical professionals I get that look. I happen to be fortunate to have worked in electric motor rewind shops early in my career, I got stuck with all the weird odd ball stuff that nobody else could fix .

So I have stated before, magnet wire is coated with insulation, different temperature classes, the thickness is 0.0015 of a inch. Copper expands at a much greater rate than the steel laminations it is wound on. Why discuss heat? The heat cycles is what causes the insulation to fail, also the greater the current the greater the heat. Even though the stator is immersed in engine oil, the inner windings will heat faster than the heat will transfer to the outer winding and oil. It stands to reason that if you load the stator to 70% on a continuous basis it will last much longer than one at 100% continuous basis , I will say the stator can only output 100% at or above 3500 RPM.

Shunt Regulator example failure. Let us say you have a 2009 Versys 650 with heated grips and a digital voltmeter , and converted to SafeGo Led lights at 36 watt each, that is a gain of about 25 to 30 watts. You have also converted the city lights from 5 watts each to 1 watt phillips led. You have also converted the license plate light I think is 10 watt. So a total reduction of 46 watts.

I mentioned shunt failure, the six diodes are still producing DC within the shunt regulator, however you notice once you are up over 2000 RPM that the voltage is climbing above 15 VDC, in fact at 2500 RPM you are at 15.5 VDC , very close to ECU failure if you go higher than 16 VDC. What to do? Turn on your heated grips and your high beam light, try and keep RPM at or below 4000 RPM. I have said this before , the engineers designed the regulator to handle a certain amount of current / voltage, I refer to as base load, by reducing the 46 watt continuous load switching to LED lighting, you have placed a additional load of 46 watts more than the regulator was designed for. Okay, let us say your headlight burnt out ( 55 watts), just how long are you going to ride like that? Secondly you still have high beam to limp through with.

SCR Series regulator.
I said it is like a switched diode, six of them to be exact, as shown in the post above, you can think of it as a variable resistance in series with the stator . In reality we have a 3 phase sine wave, the switched diodes ( SCR ) are turned on late in the collapsing sine wave, as a voltage increase comes along the SCR is switched on earlier, as the demand increases the switching comes sooner, as the voltage increase lessens the SCR is switched later. The end result is AC voltage measured at the stator plug at 6000 RPM, with base load driving at 100 KM/HR , should be around 30 to 42 VAC. My stator is producing around 180 to 200 watts , above 4000 RPM riding down the highway, with the Polaris 4016868. A shunt regulator stator is producing 300 to 330 watts under identical conditions.

Got a question feel free to ask, I probably have explained this 20 different ways by now. Is your 2015 stator going to fail, it depends on the heat cycles of the stator and on heat, we have all heard about the magic smoke escaping. Considering the cost of gas, about 4 tanks and you have the cost of a series regulator. Will your stator fail using a series regulator, possibly if you crash on the left side or if your stator is already damaged.
( no question replacing tires for $$, when your battery is dead and your stator failed, you don't need tires, you be walkin >:))

No worries , looks like Kawasaki is switching to series regulators, just not the Versys yet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #125 ·
Is there any Kawasaki series regulator that we can install on Versys?
I saw a ninja 1000 with what appears as a Polaris regulator, I assume Kawasaki is getting the same manufacturer to build regulators for them.

A male connector is available from cycle terminal Furukawa FSW. One could buy the Triumph harness and this connector , Then I could convert either a Polaris 4016868 or a Polaris 4012941 , to simply plug in. You would still need to remove the gas tank and cut pin 32 of the headlight relay and connect to pin #3. You figure in shipping and costs, those two pieces roughly $37 US , plus the regulator. Option #3 involves a relay and is doable but the 2015 wiring is short everywhere, I have photos and will post a install thread for the two regulators I just sold.

From cycle terminal, says the pins straight out back;




A similar header terminal for a printed circuit board
 
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Stator Testing / Loading/ Polaris 4012941&4016868 Discussion Thread

My "winter project" is done, and I couldn’t have done it without the help of this forum. Photos below.

Here’s what I did:
-added switched aux lighting
-installed LED indicators and installed the requisite flasher
-performed the “brake activated headlight” mod
-performed the “starter relay mod”
-added a hidden multi-function switch
-did the valve check and shim exchanges
-new plugs
-new filter
-balanced the throttle bodies
-extended the vacuum lines for future checks

Aux Lighting: I had already installed the aux relay and had a lead installed. I added a handlebar switch for independent control over the aux lights. The left side light is yellow, the right side is white. Why yellow? I like it. I’ve installed a yellow light on all of my previous bikes, so I’m continuing the tradition. Now, with the multi-function switch I added, I can run just the aux lights, which is cool.

Led Indicators: A straightforward job. I bought the flasher and LED’s a while back and was waiting for this service to do the switch. Close and far brightness is much better.

Brake Activated Headlight: I saw this first on a post by @onewizard. Now upon startup, the headlight will not come in until I pull/press the brake. The Versys is wired in such a way that, when running, bumping the starter switch cuts power to the headlight relay; let’s say you’re stopped in hot weather... you can tap the starter button to disable the headlight, freeing up power for the radiator fan. Just remember to activate the light again by squeezing the brake... Another easy mod; it involves tapping the brake trigger and using it to energize the headlight relay via pin #2 on the relay.

Starter Relay Mod: Another mod found here on the forum; @onewizard and @fasteddiecopeman are to thank. This mod involves installing a relay to control the starter relay ground. From the factory, there’s a slight sympathetic drain through this ground. The new relay is energized via the brake light wire. This way, the starter relay is only attached to ground when the ignition is on.

Multi-Function Switch: I added a switch on the starter relay ground wire, before the new relay. This switch is hidden from view. So… leaving the switch in the off position prevents the bike from starting. Switching it off AFTER starting kills the headlights. Stealth mode:)

I’ll talk about the valve check and related tasks in a separate post… admittedly I made a few mistakes along the way. https://www.kawasakiversys.com/foru...roken-bolts-other-fun-things.html#post1645061




This is where I tapped into the brake trigger wire. The other end connects to pin #2 on the relay box.


The brake trigger wire, connected to pin #2. You can see the cut black wire if you look closely. This should be taped for safety.


Starter solenoid ground wire (black/yellow) cut and connected to a relay.


The aforementioned relay, before taping. Main leads connect the starter ground wire (black/yellow). Ground goes to frame ground and the relay is energized via the tail light wire.


Test-fitting the hidden switch and wires before taping. You can see a mark denoting the edge of the side panel, and how the switch is tucked up and away from view. The switch is large and easily manipulated with gloves on. It is not illuminated.


My aux lights with city light on. Terrible photo. One side white, one side yellow.


The aux lights switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #127 ·
Starter actual current, using hall effect clamp on and Fluke 189 , yellow case meter. The photo is for display purposes only, the current was 50 amp at 11.0VDC ( this is the actual voltage measured while producing 50 amp, no load voltage was 12.9 VDC)
I had to give thought as to how to do this with the least trouble, something to consider is carrying a say 6 inch piece of 10 gauge insulted wire, I jumped out the start relay allen head socket screws with my amprobe clamped around the wire.
 

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I'm about to test my stator; every now and again I glance down and my Sparkbright is red. It always returns to green in short order, but it has me wondering... This is with no high beam and only a small draw for a cellphone charger.

Reading over Post #1 reminded me of a question I've had in my mind: is it bad (for battery/charger or bike) to start the bike with a Tender attached? I understand why it may be needed for the stator test, but my battery theory is not so strong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #129 ·
I'm about to test my stator; every now and again I glance down and my Sparkbright is red. It always returns to green in short order, but it has me wondering... This is with no high beam and only a small draw for a cellphone charger.

Reading over Post #1 reminded me of a question I've had in my mind: is it bad (for battery/charger or bike) to start the bike with a Tender attached? I understand why it may be needed for the stator test, but my battery theory is not so strong.
Only hard thing with starting with a tender attached is the sudden increase in current, it is so short I doubt you would notice. If you use a tender that much, chances are good that your battery has lost capacity. That is primarily , and I won't go into detail, that link I provided about batteries is far better, the primary reason is near full charge the battery starts to gas off, this process over time carries water as well, the result is you may have only 30% plate coverage, so when your fan comes on, at idle, it draws from the battery, once above 2000 RPM it charges back up, however as the electrolyte diminishes, you will see the voltage recovering faster, the reason being that you have less plate coverage, eventually there will not be enough capacity in the battery to start the bike even once.
 

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I've never had problems starting; a new L-ion battery is on my list of things but hasn't seemed necessary yet. I don't leave it on the tender; if I know I'm not riding for a while I'll connect it.

Is there any reason my voltage should be dropping into the "amber" (Sparkbright says this indicates >12.45v) zone while cruising? Typically 4-6k RPM. The light stays green for 99% of the time but it switches to "amber" every now and then. At those speeds I can't tell/hear if the fan is kicking on at the same moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #131 ·
I've never had problems starting; a new L-ion battery is on my list of things but hasn't seemed necessary yet. I don't leave it on the tender; if I know I'm not riding for a while I'll connect it.

Is there any reason my voltage should be dropping into the "amber" (Sparkbright says this indicates >12.45v) zone while cruising? Typically 4-6k RPM. The light stays green for 99% of the time but it switches to "amber" every now and then. At those speeds I can't tell/hear if the fan is kicking on at the same moment.
You have a series regulator installed ? If at 4 to 6k RPM and amber, that could / would be the fan if you are at or below 60 KM/HR or 30 miles / HR, even so, that shouldn't happen unless you are running high beam and incandescent bulbs.
As to your statement about a lithium battery,keep in mind the battery has a regulator controlling charge rate, short runs and repeated starting, may leave you stranded, buying a lithium battery that is a really bad idea. Here is a link read post # 11
 

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My V has the stock regulator and stator... which is why I am testing my stator soon. My goal for Lithium was to save weight (which really isn't much in the scheme of things) and create a bit more space for storage.

Went back and read that battery thread; all interesting and helpful info. My only experience with Lithium Ion has been great; put one in a CB650SC build I did a few years ago. It was so small and lightweight and easy to hide.

Make sure you have a proper charger with L-Ion batteries; DelTran (Battery Tender... the green battery) makes a few chargers and one will work for both Lithium and "normal" batteries, one only works with Lithium.

I actually had to use the warranty... I left the ignition/lights on one day coming in to the garage from a rainstorm. Killed the battery. So I call DelTran... they send me a new one. It was completely my fault but they replaced the battery.

As you say... different batteries for different applications. For now, my V has a standard battery and it's working fine. I want to make sure my charging system is working properly before any type of battery change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #133 ·
My V has the stock regulator and stator... which is why I am testing my stator soon. My goal for Lithium was to save weight (which really isn't much in the scheme of things) and create a bit more space for storage.

Went back and read that battery thread; all interesting and helpful info. My only experience with Lithium Ion has been great; put one in a CB650SC build I did a few years ago. It was so small and lightweight and easy to hide.

Make sure you have a proper charger with L-Ion batteries; DelTran (Battery Tender... the green battery) makes a few chargers and one will work for both Lithium and "normal" batteries, one only works with Lithium.

I actually had to use the warranty... I left the ignition/lights on one day coming in to the garage from a rainstorm. Killed the battery. So I call DelTran... they send me a new one. It was completely my fault but they replaced the battery.

As you say... different batteries for different applications. For now, my V has a standard battery and it's working fine. I want to make sure my charging system is working properly before any type of battery change.
One possible advantage of a Lithium battery, is the fact that the output of the regulator will not overcharge the battery. I see no positive applications for a motorcycle as of present day. (if they were NI-MH made by Sanyo Panasonic , like the AA and AAA ones I use called Eneloop , then that would interest me , however I looked at Lithium, 3 X the price of AGM , I know my lead acid last a minimum of 5 to 7 years.
 

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Starter actual current, using hall effect clamp on and Fluke 189 , yellow case meter. The photo is for display purposes only, the current was 50 amp at 11.0VDC ( this is the actual voltage measured while producing 50 amp, no load voltage was 12.9 VDC)
I had to give thought as to how to do this with the least trouble, something to consider is carrying a say 6 inch piece of 10 gauge insulted wire, I jumped out the start relay allen head socket screws with my amprobe clamped around the wire.
Polaris Install Trigger Options

A option I recommend Triumph Harness, which involves getting 10 gauge butt splices and 14 gauge, what you require is dependent on the wire gauge of this harness. Triumph Harness advantage, is extra wire length , allowing cutting the original harness connector of Kawasaki leaving 1.5 to 2 inches of wire on the removed connector to allow restoration back to OEM when selling the bike.



Before starting, a explanation as to headlight relay and parasitic drain. The electronics of the Polaris is designed for a keyed main power relay, the Versys has no such thing, the regulator has full battery voltage to it all the time . Since the design of the Polaris depends on correct polarity as to + - and the control of the output uses the same +, there is a conflict, as the Versys headlight uses one of the 3 phase outputs to trigger the headlight relay.
You need to test the stator before starting, if you have shorted turns, adding a series regulator will free up power to hasten the failure of existing damaged windings, I don't want to hear someone say the Polaris caused damage , follow my post Regulator/ Series / CompuFire / MK-1

I have come up with 4 options ( 2019 )to bypass this problem when installing either Polaris or CompuFire Series Regulators see post #3



Note October 2019 Option #1 is used mainly if you wish to leave the 3 phase stator plugs intact, you then need follow below, If you don't care about the 3 phase plugs, go to post 57 Option #4


Option #1 and #2 involve removing the gas tank
#1 cut black pin #2 1.25" long and connect to gray 1/8 "striped insulation & soldering Pin#3 See Photo Verskpd#2 / Screwdriver


Option #2 also involves using a diode, unless you are familiar with electronics , and don't want the headlight coming on until you are ready to ride, my recommendation is to steer clear of this option.

Option #3 involves buying a cheap 12 volt relay but the gas tank can be left in place.

I strongly recommend installing a voltage indicating device,heads up by signal dynamics or neat little voltmeter as in my photo here

neat little volt meter, extremely accurate, day or night


Parts required & Tools

Triumph harness,
T2500676 Triumph Link Lead, Regulator $9.08 - 2WheelPros



Using the Triumph Harness: Keep in mind, with the harness you have a additional 5 connections, you will need to cut the connectors off the end that would go to the stator, and butt splice or solder these 5 connections.The two insulated 10 gauge but splice crimps and three 14 gauge insulated butt splice crimps, are required when using this harness ( if you wish to solder that would eliminate the crimps). Several people have stated they found it easier to use the Triumph harness. I now recommend going this route, many don't know how to crimp and the Polaris is a bit of a oversize spade.



( I no longer recommend this)----if you plan on going with the OEM wiring and no after market harness; you need two insulated 10 gauge female spade stakon crimps and three 14 gauge female spade insulated crimps, ( 2 insulated 10 gauge butt splices , 3 insulated 14 gauge butt splices or solder in place of the crimps ) some silicone, 3 feet of 16 or 18 gauge wire, also 16 inches of #10 stranded insulated, plastic sandwich bag if you are not using the Triumph harness.Using 1/4 inch female spade stakons direct to the Polaris, expect to need to open the very start of the spade connector, as the Polaris male spade connectors are oversize in thickness, using electrical grease sparingly is also a good idea in either case of install.
I used a wrap of electrical tape around each spade connector, this allowed me to pump in silicone into the cavity , I reverse the tape after the first wrap, sticky side out, using half laps refereed to as reverse taping and the purpose of the sandwich bag.

Before you start, remove the positive battery terminal , instead of the main fuse.

Wiring of Polaris colour code, looking at inside male spade terminals, grey socket on left, black output socket on right. Left grey socket is 3 phase input in any order, that is the 3 black wires . Black output socket is left terminal Positive output, OEM Kawasaki Positive wire is white with a blue tracer. Black output socket right terminal is negative output, Kawi colour is black with a yellow tracer.
This is a 07 using the older non Triumph harness method


Again this is the old method, I released some slack in the harness close to the throttle cable, gains about 8 inches of extra wire length. If you had a Triumph harness , butt splices or solder would be in place of the female spade crimps.
Also note the brown wire is taped to protect it, as it is no longer reguired unless you wanted to use it to power led lights from a key switch.

Have a close look at the white/ blue, you will see the black electrical tape on the yellow insulated sleeve, I did one full wrap over the female spade part ,this was done because fully insulated stakons wouldn't fit inside this socket and was done to prevent silicone from entering this area, anyone that has used silicone knows how hard it is to remove once cured

this is the DIY before the Triumph harness was discovered. Notice the brown wire remaining in the harness, this was a keyed control on these early versions, needs to be isolated / taped.

The following photo was before triumph and back or reverse taping, this allows easy removal later, a sandwich bag was used and all the connectors were pushed through a small hole in the bottom, silicone was pumped into the socket and a small amount into the bag, which was taped in place onto the regulator, then the silicone was formed, last reverse tape this later a matter of scoring the tape, once the silicone cures the tape is redundant.


FYI if you make a mistake on the output wires, that is put positive where negative should be **good news, you get nothing outputted , also if you connect all 3 phase, start the bike and don't have both positive and negative connected and also to a battery with a minimum 8 volts, again you will get no output.

This is for option 2, view of my 2015, however all years are similar, note the red clip holding the fuel line in place, I describe this in detail in my valve shim thread. No room in this post as I have a limited # of characters .

So much discussion in previous posts about the diode, if you are not planning on using a diode, see wiring diagram Page 16-80 of the service manual ( 2015).

You need to cut the black wire pin#2 of the center headlight relay, like in my following post. Without a diode there is a 70% chance of the headlight coming on before you hit the brake, remember the headlight relay latches into the on position and will only turn off by hitting the start button or turning the key off, just a FYI. I like to bring the battery up to full charge while warming the bike up and also the load on the motor is reduced, there is a downfall to this circuit, on 2 occasions I have started the bike and was in gear, never touched the brake for 3 KM, and had no headlight, but I have Denali lights on all the time.




View of the relay box 2015 Versys Photos








Top of 2015 showing the fuel tank rubber mounts, tank slides back to remove, also shown is the connector going to the front brake


Front brake connector , note purple wire I added for my headlight relay trigger cct. also note the blue with red tracer is the brake signal and a small piece of insulation was removed and I soldered the purple wire to it





Verspkd #1

So the relay box end , center connector is the headlight relay, below is the connector with pin #2 black wire about to be cut and my purple trigger wire waiting to be soldered
Verspkd #2 Note the Black pin #2 and gray pin#3 with the screwdriver between

here is the purple soldered to the old 3 phase output #1phase wire, pin #2 black, which has been taped the same as the brown wire, no longer needed, but still powered

If you look real close you will see the black wire taped with yellow tape, I use yellow as it is a standard for external live parts and gets your attention

Joint is taped

A trick to taping in confined spaces using a tool such as this bent screwdriver
Hi to everyone!
I want to ask you something.
I've changed the stock regulator with the sh775 after I've burned out the stator.
So, new stator, new regulator.
To fix the "always turned on headlight relay" issue, I've used a tail light triggered relay to cut the negative pole of the regulator. And it works!
But, I don't know why, I think my relay box doesn't works now.
The headlight now is still off and I ear a very bad noise from it.
It's just burned out the headlight relay? It's depending on my mod?
I don't think so, but please help me!

Also, I used the headlight to turn on another external relay (To power UAB charger ect)
This relay can be make trouble to the relay box?
I've tested the stator phases and they're ok.
Sorry for my bad English, I hope you understand what I'm saying!
Bye!
 

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Discussion Starter · #135 ·
First I need to draw that out, but doubt that is correct. Is this a legit 775 BA regulator with the number 4012941 on it?
 

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First I need to draw that out, but doubt that is correct. Is this a legit 775 BA regulator with the number 4012941 on it?
What isn't correct?
The "headlight fix" method that I've used?
Trust me, it works great... I've think that the solenoid relay ground is the same with GND of the regulator...
I was thinking to how to fix this problem before discover this discussion, and I've try to disconnect the regulator.
When I've done it, I've heard that the headlight relay turned off... So I've just used a external 12v 5pin relay to do that.
182538
 

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Discussion Starter · #137 ·
So I have a set up where you break the ground wire at the start solenoid and insert a relay, using the tail light to activate. I am on my phone and will reply in more detail tomorrow. If I understand correctly, you used the relay contact to break the negative output power , which can reach 23 amp. Breaking the start solenoid ground wire , involves switching roughly 0.100 amp maximum or 100 milliamp . A fraction of what your connection does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #138 ·
What isn't correct?
The "headlight fix" method that I've used?
Trust me, it works great... I've think that the solenoid relay ground is the same with GND of the regulator...
I was thinking to how to fix this problem before discover this discussion, and I've try to disconnect the regulator.
When I've done it, I've heard that the headlight relay turned off... So I've just used a external 12v 5pin relay to do that.
View attachment 182538
No idea of that regulator but I doubt it is a series regulator.
Correct Number is 4012941 SH775 BA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #139 ·
OK READ your post, no headlight. How did you wire the polaris relay. Did you use the original wiring at the old regulator or did you connect the wire directly from your stator to the new regulator? Like I said, tomorrow with more info. If you have a meter, you can measure volts AC of the 3 phase input UNDER ACTUAL LOAD, if it is a series regulator, at 2500 RPM , YOU should have about 28 to 30 VAC with 14.2 VDC out, if you get 18 to 20 VAC you have a shunt regulator Not Series.
 

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Discussion Starter · #140 ·
A little more info. If you wired the regulator directly from the stator , you don't need the relay. The connector that went from the stator into the main harness has a trigger wire. Very easy to correct. You can use the horn as a trigger for the headlight. It is live the instant the key is on. One if the 3 phase wires is tapped and triggers the headlight relay.
 
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