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Introduction :

In 2003 I installed an AudioVox CCS100 vacuum cruise control on my Valkyrie and never looked back.

Having used this set-up from 2003 to 2015, I feel that it was the most useful and appreciated farkle on my bike.

The cruise control spoiled me. While touring I often like to use the cruise control to lock in the permitted speed, and then enjoy the road, the scenery, etc. without worrying about speed limits, etc. Whether I’m going uphill or downhill does not change anything. The cruise control module will either speed up or down to maintain the selected speed.

Note: I’m sure that it has avoided me more than a few speeding tickets.

The AudioVox has already been installed on generations 1 and 2 of the Versys 650. However I did not find any information about the CCS100 for the 2015 Versys 650.

Close examination of my 2015 650 immediately showed me the lack of space to install the CCS100 module and an accompanying vacuum reservoir.

I therefore started watching eBay for Rostra 250-1223 Universal Cruise control units. I eventually purchased one.

Note: These are standalone electronic cruise control modules (without any vacuum reservoir).

Description (copied from Rostra vendors)

“The Rostra Cruise Control kit is designed to add a cruise control system to those vehicles which did not come with one from the factory. Set your speed with a touch of your finger--once selected, your Rostra cruise control constantly measures changes in the engine loading and vehicle speed to maintain a constant speed on the highway. Easily set the controls and avoid unintended speeding. Slow down or accelerate--you don't have to touch the throttle”.

Universal Installation Instructions


The Rostra 250-1223 manual can be read and/or downloaded here.

What’s in the box?


250-1223 Components
- Cruise Module A
- Cruise Wiring Harness B
- Cruise Cable C
- Module Bracket D
- Cable Bracket E
- Hardware package (nuts, bolts, washers, etc.)



Mounting the 250-1223 Rostra Control Module

After receiving my 250-1223 Rostra Universal Cruise Control, I eagerly examined my 2015 Versys for possible places to install the module.
Lack of space prevented me from installing the unit under either the left fairing or under the seat. I therefore decided to attach it to the bracket behind the left Shad sidecase of my Versys (near the rear tail).


Waterproofing the wires, etc.

Since the module and wiring harness are exposed, I decided to protect them as much as possible with shrink tube.


The wiring connector on the module was then covered with Spider Patch Wrap It Tape (self-fusing sealing silicone tape).


Routing the wiring harness

A hole was drilled and a grommet inserted under the tail section of the bike. The wiring harness was then passed through the grommet to end up under the seat.


Routing the throttle control cable

The modified Rostra mounting bracket attached to the Shad sidecase bracket on my Versys permitted to point the Rostra throttle cable in towards the front of the bike.
From the left side of the bike, the cable crosses over the swingarm to the right side. On the right side, it then continues towards the front of the bike (i.e.: towards the bike’s throttle bellcrank).


The above is a throttle cable bracket that I had left over from my AudioVox cruise control parts.

Note: A Rostra 250-3700 Cable Bracket as shown below could have been used by cutting off part of the L portion and then bending the end at a 90-degree angle in order to receive the Rostra snap-in adaptor.


On the right side of the bike, just below the rear shock top bolt, there is a small hole where 2 frame tubes had been welded together by Kawasaki. I drilled the hole a bit larger to permit anchoring the cable bracket to the frame.



Throttle linkage (Throttle body bellcrank)

The Rostra cruise control requires 41 mm of travel to operate smoothly. The diameter of the Versys bellcrank is too small to permit full cruise control travel to wide open throttle. To get closer to the desired 41 mm, a piece of aluminum strap was attached to the bellcrank. This decreases the sensitivity of the system and therefore permits smoother accelerations, etc.

The bellcrank had previously been drilled and tapped. Small machine bolts were used along with blue Loctite and nyloc nuts.

Note: The strap is 2 ¾ inches (7 cm) long. Spacers are placed under the strap to standoff from the bellcrank a bit. 3 or 4 beads of chain were used. My objective was to leave no more than 1/16 inch of cable slack because too much slack causes slow engagement.



Note: The above bellcrank control arm idea was copied from bscott.

Very little throttle slack is needed. Too much slack would result in more throttle engagement time. The cruise control unit will then try to compensate and you could then experience throttle surging.


Part 1 of 3 (continued)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Introduction :

In 2003 I installed an AudioVox CCS100 vacuum cruise control on my Valkyrie and never looked back.

Having used this set-up from 2003 to 2015, I feel that it was the most useful and appreciated farkle on my bike.

The cruise control spoiled me. While touring I often like to use the cruise control to lock in the permitted speed, and then enjoy the road, the scenery, etc. without worrying about speed limits, etc. Whether I’m going uphill or downhill does not change anything. The cruise control module will either speed up or down to maintain the selected speed.

Note: I’m sure that it has avoided me more than a few speeding tickets.

The AudioVox has already been installed on generations 1 and 2 of the Versys 650. However I did not find any information about the CCS100 for the 2015 Versys 650.

Close examination of my 2015 650 immediately showed me the lack of space to install the CCS100 module and an accompanying vacuum reservoir.

I therefore started watching eBay for Rostra 250-1223 Universal Cruise control units. I eventually purchased one.

Note: These are standalone electronic cruise control modules (without any vacuum reservoir).

Description (copied from Rostra vendors)

“The Rostra Cruise Control kit is designed to add a cruise control system to those vehicles which did not come with one from the factory. Set your speed with a touch of your finger--once selected, your Rostra cruise control constantly measures changes in the engine loading and vehicle speed to maintain a constant speed on the highway. Easily set the controls and avoid unintended speeding. Slow down or accelerate--you don't have to touch the throttle”.

Universal Installation Instructions


The Rostra 250-1223 manual can be read and/or downloaded here.

What’s in the box?


250-1223 Components
- Cruise Module A
- Cruise Wiring Harness B
- Cruise Cable C
- Module Bracket D
- Cable Bracket E
- Hardware package (nuts, bolts, washers, etc.)



Mounting the 250-1223 Rostra Control Module

After receiving my 250-1223 Rostra Universal Cruise Control, I eagerly examined my 2015 Versys for possible places to install the module.
Lack of space prevented me from installing the unit under either the left fairing or under the seat. I therefore decided to attach it to the bracket behind the left Shad sidecase of my Versys (near the rear tail).







Waterproofing the wires, etc.

Since the module and wiring harness are exposed, I decided to protect them as much as possible with shrink tube.



The wiring connector on the module was then covered with Spider Patch Wrap It Tape (self-fusing sealing silicone tape).





Routing the wiring harness

A hole was drilled and a grommet inserted under the tail section of the bike. The wiring harness was then passed through the grommet to end up under the seat.



Routing the throttle control cable

The modified Rostra mounting bracket attached to the Shad sidecase bracket on my Versys permitted to point the Rostra throttle cable in towards the front of the bike.
From the left side of the bike, the cable crosses over the swingarm to the right side. On the right side, it then continues towards the front of the bike (i.e.: towards the bike’s throttle bellcrank).





To anchor the cruise control cable to the right side of the bike, a Rostra snap-in adaptor and a throttle cable bracket were used.





The above is a throttle cable bracket that I had left over from my AudioVox cruise control parts.

Note: A Rostra 250-3700 Cable Bracket as shown below could have been used by cutting off part of the L portion and then bending the end at a 90-degree angle in order to receive the Rostra snap-in adaptor.





On the right side of the bike, just below the rear shock top bolt, there is a small hole where 2 frame tubes had been welded together by Kawasaki. I drilled the hole a bit larger to permit anchoring the cable bracket to the frame.



Throttle linkage (Throttle body bellcrank)

The Rostra cruise control requires 41 mm of travel to operate smoothly. The diameter of the Versys bellcrank is too small to permit full cruise control travel to wide open throttle. To get closer to the desired 41 mm, a piece of aluminum strap was attached to the bellcrank. This decreases the sensitivity of the system and therefore permits smoother accelerations, etc.

The bellcrank had previously been drilled and tapped. Small machine bolts were used along with blue Loctite and nyloc nuts.

Note: The strap is 2 ¾ inches (7 cm) long. Spacers are placed under the strap to standoff from the bellcrank a bit. 3 or 4 beads of chain were used. My objective was to leave no more than 1/16 inch of cable slack because too much slack causes slow engagement.





Note: The above bellcrank control arm idea was copied from bscott.

Very little throttle slack is needed. Too much slack would result in more throttle engagement time. The cruise control unit will then try to compensate and you could then experience throttle surging.



Part 1 of 3 (continued)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Electrical

A total of 3 relays have been used to supply main power, brake signal and clutch lever signals to my Rostra cruise control module.

Wire connections

10 wires are connected to the Rostra module.

The wiring instructions in the Rostra manual are weak to say the least. After having examined various motorcycle set-ups on the net, I realized that the number of connections could be reduced. This resulted in using only 4 connections for the control unit, and then 3 more for the ON/OFF, Set/Coast and Resume/Accel buttons.

Ground – Black and Blue wires from the control unit directly to ground.

Ignition – Brown and Red wires from the Control Unit to the cruise control main power relay.

Brake – Purple wire from the Control Unit to the Brake Security Relay.

Speedometer – Gray wire from the Control Unit to the VSS (Vehicle Speed Signal) on the Versys.

Not used - Light Green wire and Orange wire

Control switches/buttons

Instead of using the Rostra control switch, I decided to keep my handlebar uncluttered and use 3 mini push button switches on the left side of the Versys fairing inner cover as follows:



ON/OFF button – ON/OFF LED switch connected to switched 12 volts on one side, and to tab 86 of the main cruise control relay on the other. It is also connected to tab 85 of the clutch safety relay.

Set/Coast button – momentary switch connected on one side to switched 12 volts, and on the other side to the Dark Green wire on the Rostra module.

Resume/Accel button – momentary switch connected on one side to switched 12 volts, and on the other side to the Yellow wire on the Rostra module.

Note: The above button/switch connections are illustrated below in the wiring diagram of the Rostra Power Supply.

Rostra Power Supply

The 250-1223 unit uses electrical power to pull on the throttle. A switched fused relay was therefore used to power it.



Clutch and Brake Safety Relays

In order to operate, the Rostra Universal Cruise Control module needs to be connected to ground. This is usually accomplished through the brake light circuit. However this does not function on vehicles with LED brake lights. Note that the Versys has LED brake lights…

To “get around” this problem, a relay can be used to connect to ground. If this ground connection is broken, the 1223 Cruise Control unit is released (disengages).

I like the idea of disengaging the cruise control by pressing either the clutch lever or the brake lever/pedal. This can be done by using 2 SPDT (5 pins) relays as follows:



The cruise control unit is now well under control. It now disengages instantly if the clutch or brake lever/pedal is applied because the required ground connection will be broken.

Clutch Relay Trigger

On the Relay Box (under the seat/fuel tank), on the left connector, splice into the Red/Green wire. This is position 12 on that left connector.

Relay box Diagram from page 16-80 of the Kawasaki Versys service manual.







While doing these connections, I hit a snag. With the ignition ON, my wire spliced into the above Red/Green wire would give a constant ground. This ground seemed to be feedback from the relay, etc. Note: I’m under the impression that this would not cause problems later on (i.e.: cancel the cruise control because of a ground signal coming from the clutch relay).

In order to avoid potential problems, I decided to place a diode between the clutch Red/Green wire (pointing in the direction of the Red/Green wire) and the wire going to tab 86 of the Clutch Safety Relay.



Brake Relay Trigger

Tab 86 of my brake security relay was connected to the blue wire in the rear tail light harness.

Part 2 of 3 (continued)
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
VSS Connection (Vehicle Speed Signal) on the bike

The 250-1223 reads the bike’s speed from signals that are sent from the speed sensor.

The wire loom for the Speed Sensor starts on the left side of the bike (near the drive sprocket) and finishes with a black connector under the fuel tank.



From the above black connector, the wire loom continues upwards toward the meter unit (speedometer, etc.) and also to the ECU. See page 3-61 in the Kawasaki Versys service manual.

A wire has been spliced to the light Green/Red wire in the loom. The other end of the wire is connected to the gray wire (VSS) of the Rostra control unit.





DIP Switch Settings

DIP switches are used to program the cruise control module to the vehicle (i.e.: Versys 650) on which it is installed.

Twelve (12) programming switches and a diagnostic LED are located under the rubber grommet on top of the Rostra cruise control module.

Switch settings are broken down as follows:

Gain, Pulses Per Mile, Engine Setup Timer , VSS Source , Transmission , Control Switch.

Positions 1 & 2: Gain

OFF OFF = Extra Low

Gain is how the cruise reacts to road conditions and to motor size (i.e.: sensitivity).

Positions 3, 4, 5 & 6: Pulses Per Mile (PPM)

ON OFF ON OFF = 12,000 PPM

The number of pulses per mile emitted by the Versys speed sensor needed to be calculated.

For my Versys, the rear tire circumference is 77.5 inches. Note: 1 mile = 63360 inches.

Therefore 63360 inches/77.5 inches (tire circumference) = 817.55 tire rotations per mile.

The final drive ratio for my bike is: 15 teeth (front sprocket)/46 teeth (rear sprocket) = .3260869.

817.55 tire rotations per mile/.3260869 (final drive ratio) = 2507.15 drive sprocket rotations per mile.

The drive sprocket speed sensor nut has 4 corners. There are therefore 4 pulses per sprocket rotation.
2507.15 front sprocket rotations X 4 = 10,028.59 PPM (Pulses Per Mile).

Note: I tried 10,000 PPM but prefer 12,000 because it seems to operate more smoothly.

Positions 7, 8 & 9: Engine Setup Timer

OFF OFF OFF = 8 Cylinder Low

Engine Setup timer is how fast the cruise retracts the throttle cable when the Set/Coast button is pressed.

Note: IMHO 8 cylinder Low is not well described by Rostra. These 3 switches have nothing to do with number of cylinders. They specify how fast the throttle cable retracts when the SET button is pressed.

Note: I tried 4 cylinder low but 8 Cylinder Low felt quite smoother. I would guess that it is because a motorcycle is a high horsepower-to-weight application.

Position 10 = VSS Source

ON = Square Wave Input

The Speed Sensor on the Versys generates a Square Wave Signal.

Position 11 = Transmission

OFF = Manual Transmission

Note: I was able to choose Manual Transmission because a clutch security relay was used.

Position 12 = Control Switch

OFF = Open Circuit

Open Circuit was selected for my mini push button switches.

Note: If a Rostra cruise control switch as the following had been used, I would have needed to refer to page 23 of the Rostra document to see if I had a Closed or Open Circuit switch and also for the wiring instructions.



Troubleshooting

The cruise control engaged, etc. during the first test run on my Versys. If it had not engaged, or if either the Set/Coast or the Accel/Resume buttons did not function, I would have needed to refer to the Rostra troubleshooting procedures on page 20 of their installation document.

Note: I have read that the instructions in the Rostra installation manual for entering in diagnostic mode are incorrect. Apparently you need to press and hold (as you turn ON the ignition) both the cruise control ON/OFF button and also the RESUME/ACCEL button. I cannot confirm this because I have not needed to use the diagnostic function of the Rostra cruise control unit.

Additional Notes


Although each of the following has been described individually, they are all interrelated:

- Throttle control arm length

- Gain

- Engine Setup Timer

Therefore any of the following changes would make the cruise control more aggressive:

- Shorter throttle control arm

- Higher gains

- Higher Engine Setup Timer

Note: The opposite would make the cruise control unit more sluggish.

Results on my 2015 Versys 650

On my bike, the 250-1223 Rostra functions very well. It is rock solid.

I have tested it at different speeds:

- On major highways (100 KPH +) it functions very well (in 5th or 6th gear).

- At 70 KPH (in 4th gear) it still functions very well.

In the installation manual, Rostra mentions that this cruise control can be engaged at any speed higher than 33 miles per hour (50 kilometers per hour). At 50 KPH (in 3rd gear), my Rostra Cruise Control tends to hunt (throttle surging). Since I wouldn’t use it at such low speeds, I do not consider this to be an issue.

IMHO this cruise control unit functions flawlessly on a Versys 650. It does everything expected from a good vehicle cruise control unit.

I look forward to doing as many relaxing long tours with this Rostra unit on my Versys as I have during the past 12 years with a AudioVox CCS100 on my Valkyrie.

Part 3 of 3
 

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Rostra Electronic Cruise Control / Polaris Regulator Install

Holy cow superman, you should be able to install a Polaris regulator blindfolded and one hand tied behind your back!

So something to think about, I haven't looked at the circuit, but I have done this before, using multiple diodes and one relay, brake /clutch circuit.

I had considered it for my 07, then the vacuum style was discontinued and my understanding the whole aftermarket line, after some research it would appear they are still available, about $289 USD
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Holy cow superman, you should be able to install a Polaris regulator blindfolded and one hand tied behind your back!
Not quite LOL! For my Polaris regulator installation, I had an advantage. A wizard showed me the way! :D

So something to think about, I haven't looked at the circuit, but I have done this before, using multiple diodes and one relay, brake /clutch circuit.
I'm sure that this would not be a problem for you.

I had considered it for my 07, then the vacuum style was discontinued and my understanding the whole aftermarket line, after some research it would appear they are still available, about $289 USD
That's quite high .... especially with our Canuck dollars. They sometimes pop up at lower prices.

Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #10
wow! I was thinking at your cruise control this summer when I went to the states!
Maybe I'll do something like that, I'll come see you :D
Anytime you wish sir. Just cross the bridge to south shore with your Versys. We could then exchange notes, lies, etc. :D
 

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First Time Multi-Quote in 2 months

Not quite LOL! For my Polaris regulator installation, I had an advantage. A wizard showed me the way! :D



I'm sure that this would not be a problem for you.



That's quite high .... especially with our Canuck dollars. They sometimes pop up at lower prices.

Thank you
Yes I have a hard time justifying spending $400 Canadian for something I might use a few times a year, however it is the challenge:grin2:that interests me:yeahsmile:

NICE work and "write-up"...!

:thumb: - :thumb:
I agree , what a awesome posting, hope you got my email, next is to solve Chrome.
 

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hmmm...
we normally get tickets because we failed to slow down in a lower limit zone.
cruise control "really" doesn't help there.

good project though, but I will stick with gocruise2

I know it's not a regulator, just a throttle lock, but I only need steady speed on flat straight surface which work fine,
otherwise it's removing the fun of motorcycling; if I wanted to do nothing, I would take a bus.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
hmmm...
we normally get tickets because we failed to slow down in a lower limit zone.
cruise control "really" doesn't help there.
Sorry I disagree. When you are riding for long lengths of time in 70 KPH zones, or on main highways at 100 KPH, it is VERY EASY to go overboard and get hit by LEOs. I have been touring for long enough to know that. :D

good project though, but I will stick with gocruise2

I know it's not a regulator, just a throttle lock, but I only need steady speed on flat straight surface which work fine,
otherwise it's removing the fun of motorcycling; if I wanted to do nothing, I would take a bus.
MANY riders use electronic cruise controls. None of them want to do nothing. They simply enjoy the convenience. Different strokes for different folks. :D
 

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Quexpress, excellent write up.

I've decided to follow in your footsteps. I have installed an Audiovox unit on my c-10 Concours so I'm aware of the project in front of me.

The Rostra arrived today. The control unit will not go where yours is as I have the LT bags. My thought is to install the unit in the fairing on top of the headlight housing.

I do have a question on that diode installed near the clutch relay. Is it required? Also, any particular rating or specification for that diode?

I plan on starting this undertaking tomorrow, yeehaw.

Thanks for the superb write up and any info on that diode.

Later, SteveJ
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Quexpress, excellent write up.

I've decided to follow in your footsteps. I have installed an Audiovox unit on my c-10 Concours so I'm aware of the project in front of me.
Having installed a CCS100, you will certainly find this to be a cleaner installation (less parts).

The Rostra arrived today. The control unit will not go where yours is as I have the LT bags. My thought is to install the unit in the fairing on top of the headlight housing.

I plan on starting this undertaking tomorrow, yeehaw.
Cool!

I do have a question on that diode installed near the clutch relay. Is it required? Also, any particular rating or specification for that diode?
I'm quite sure that it was not necessary. However, since I was not 100% sure, I installed one.
I used an Epoxy Rectifier Diode (3 Amp/400 PIV). I believe that I purchased mine years ago at Radio Shack. They are very inexpensive.

Thanks for the superb write up and any info on that diode.
Later, SteveJ
You are most welcome! Just trying to give back to fellow Versys owners/forum members. Good luck! :thumb:
 

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Quexpress, after looking at things a bit I may do something a bit different on the throttle pull hook up.

I'm thinking put a screw in the tang that's at about 10-11 o clock on the bell crank. I think it closes the flies?? I plan on having the probably #8 screw stick out about 3/4" and attach the pull there. I will use the clutch cable holder bolts to hold the cruise cable bracket. There is plenty of travel for the cruise to pull. Should work.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Quexpress, after looking at things a bit I may do something a bit different on the throttle pull hook up.

I'm thinking put a screw in the tang that's at about 10-11 o clock on the bell crank. I think it closes the flies?? I plan on having the probably #8 screw stick out about 3/4" and attach the pull there. I will use the clutch cable holder bolts to hold the cruise cable bracket. There is plenty of travel for the cruise to pull. Should work.
Since the Rostra throttle cable will be coming from the front of the bike, that should/could work.

Note: Make sure that the throttle cable properly anchored on the throttle bracket. I had to reattach mine because it was not done properly the first time. :eek:

Another note: The Rostra unit might/could fit under the left side fairing where the Evaporative Emission Control System canister is located for CA bikes, etc.
 

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I'm liking that left fairing idea, though for some reason I wound up with a Cali bike. The unit "will fit" over the headlights, but ain't real purty. As an aside, the less weight on/in the fairing, the better. I picked up a GPS dash from SW Motech that mounts on top of the meter cover and it does have more heft to it than I anticipated. Aluminum bracketry for that would have been preferable.

I located a post from Alaska Jeff on how to re-plumb/remove the evap can, will be charging forward.

This bike is gonna wind up being on the lift for quite a while as I keep adding things to do while it's apart. I just added checking the valves to the list as it has almost 11,000 miles on it. Maybe I'll hang on to the KLR a bit longer...

Thanx for your continuing posts/help/contributions.
 
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