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Discussion Starter #1
Hey brothers, I am putting the final touches together on my street fighter conversion and I had a question on location of the overflow tank. Attached is the picture of where I want it located. However, I'm not sure if the inlet/outlet tubing needs to be above the radiator. Does it use gravity or pressure? Can I run the inlet/outlet to the radiator from the bottom of the bottle or do I need to run a dip tube from the top? Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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Don't know the answer to the question, but I like the overflow tank. Did a stainless tank on my 66 Mustang but never occurred to me to do one on the bike.
 

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There needs to be a coolant line (one way or another ending near the bottom of the bottle) plus a vent at the top. The coolant expands, eventually creating enough pressure to overcome the cap spring, pushing fluid into the tank. As the bike cools the fluid contracts, creating a lower pressure in the system and draws the coolant back in. You kinda need fluid in the tank when it's cool to keep the overflow tube covered to maintain a closed system.

Or I could be wrong
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I agree and understand there needs to be a line to the radiator, and and overflow line to the ground. I just didn't know if the line to the radiator from the bottom of the bottle needed to be higher than the cap to the radiator or if it could be lower like I Jane mounted in the picture.
 

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Yes I believe that would be too low... You need a tank that is not as tall, and more like the black one shown.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm going to try it. I see a lot of pictures on street fighter forum with same setup as mine. Wish me luck.
 

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Neat system.

Looks sharp.

Is that "can" something sold/intended for that?

If this was the KLR forum, I would know the answer, and assume it came from the plumbing aisle at Fleet Farm.... :topsecret:

In that vein, the KLR guys could tote OIL in a second one.
Or we could make the ultimate long range chain oiler from one...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The can came from eBay. It was made to be a coolant tank.

I have it mounted and it theoretically should work.
 

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It can't work like that. You'll draw air in your cooling system when engine cools down. If it's full enough, it'll overflow when it warms up, then level will be too low and you'll still pull air in the return line... Your canister is too tall. It needs to be smaller and higher.
 

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It can't work like that. You'll draw air in your cooling system when engine cools down. If it's full enough, it'll overflow when it warms up, then level will be too low and you'll still pull air in the return line... Your canister is too tall. It needs to be smaller and higher.
It should work if there is a tube in the tank that goes to the bottom and is (I'm guessing) 1/2 full of coolant. I think that's how jdrocks did his. He posted a picture of his in Fox's other thread about making the bike naked.
 

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Expansion (Overflow) Tank

Several cooling systems make use of a clear plastic container, which is connected to the overflow tube from the radiator. This container provides extra storage space for the coolant when it expands and is called the expansion, or overflow tank. It is also known as the coolant reservoir, or overflow canister.

As the engine heats up, the coolant inside it expands. Without the expansion tank, the coolant would flow out of the overflow tube and be lost from the cooling system onto the street. Instead, the coolant flows into the expansion tank.

Since a vacuum is created in the cooling system when the engine cools, the vacuum causes some of the coolant in the expansion tube to be sucked back into the system. Because a cooling system with an expansion tank is virtually a closed system, the coolant can flow between the system and the expansion tank as it expands and contracts. This way, no coolant is lost if the system is functioning properly.

Another function of the expansion tank is to remove air bubbles from the cooling system. Coolant without air-bubbles is much more efficient than coolant with air bubbles, because it absorbs heat much faster.

The advantage of the expansion tank is that while the level of coolant contained in it rises and falls, the radiator is always full.

Older cars can easily be fitted with expansion tanks, simply by mounting the tank near the radiator, connecting it to the overflow tube, and replacing the radiator cap.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Exactly. As long as the radiator is full and there is some type of level in the overflow tank, the radiator can't suck air. The purpose for these tanks is to not dump coolant into the street and not have to continuously add coolant like you used to have to with older cars. In fact cars ran forever without expansion tanks. The "expansion tank" was basically inside the radiator. It wasn't until they started to get slimmer and smaller profiles on radiators for the need for expansion tanks. There really doesn't need to be a lever inside the expansion tank of the radiator is full.

Think of it as the straw effect. You put a straw into water and put your finger over the hole, creating a seal. Basically all you need to do is open the cap to radiator, fill the overflow tank till it starts to run out of the radiator. Close the cap and your done. You created a seal. The engine is cold, radiator is full and you have a level In the coolant tank. When it warms up, and if the coolant tank is too full, it will spew the guts on the street. As it cools down, the negative pressure will suck from the bottom of the coolant tank to make up for what was lost, if that even happens.
 

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You still can't have the hose rise up to your tank inlet that much... When mounting any top fed recovery/reserve coolant tank, make sure it's as close as possible to the pressure cap. The feed line should be short and level, to reduce restriction and the effects of gravity. With the recovery tank 1/3 full (with a cold engine), every heat cycle will automatically purge more air out of the system.

You'll soon find out for yourself.
 

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I broke my coolant tank last week and had a return trip to Mexico planned for June 8. Went to Target and bought a $3.00 baby bottle, attached it to the engine guard. One vent tube out the top. Radiator hose dropped down to the bottom of the bottle. Filled the bottle up 2/3. Check the rad coolant level and it was full. Rode about 1000 miles in two days at speeds between 75-85 mph. Idled the motor numerous times for immigration, police, customs, and construction delays. Checked the coolant level in the radiator this morning and full to the top as it should be. Coolant level in the recovery tank also the same. And I can buy a baby bottle in any town in Mexico if the need arises along the way. Looks like crap but it worked for me, form follows function.

The coolant tank on my KLX was rear of the motor about a meter away from the radiator. Worked fine until I smashed a rock into it. Mounted a piece of PVC with zip ties on the front of the rad for a recovery tank. Same principle, vacuum. Worked fine for 3 years until I sold the bike.

Edit: On both bikes, the line from the rad cap drops down from the cap into the bottom of the recovery bottle. I just saw the photo in the link above and agree. I don´t think the installed loop up from the rad cap and then down into the recovery tank is a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just to be clear. This is how it is set up. Any air that is expelled from the radiator should be pushed into the overflow tank, rise to the top section of the tank. As it calls for liquid, the negative pressure from the radiator will suck from bottom of the overflow tank. The radiator will not suck in more than it needs, so if I fill the tank and radiator up while it's cold, it shouldn't be calling for more. It won't suck in air if there is a high enough level in the overflow tank. As it expands, it's only going to dump excess into the tank. And if the tank is too full, it will only dump excess onto the ground, leaving the desired level in the overflow tank to correctly operate the heating/cooling cycle.
 

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Looks right to me
Whether you have the tube in from the bottom or going thru top cap to the bottom it should work.
The shorter & straighter the path the better.
On the other hand ...I'd swear my neighbors bandit has it's tank under the seat, all the way back(there was some colorful language the last time he changed coolant).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So upon a quick google search, I have found many setups with the tube to radiator out the bottom, including some stock setups. Either way, there will be a vertical rise either from the dip tube or out bottom of tank to radiator. As long as there is liquid in the overflow tank you have a seal, in either setup.
 

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