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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,
Got intermittent abs failure and I think it's related to the rear abs sensor cable.
I moved/flex once, started failling within 30 seconds.
Moved again, failed right on ignition.
Moved again, seems to work again.

Could be a cable issue and it's likely my fault as I left the caliper holder hanging by this cable while removing wheel...

So now I don't want to pay over 130 $ for a fraking cable.
What can I hope for?

It appears to be a 2 lead wire (based on manual diag procedure), so I'm thinking if there is no particular resistance in the cable, assuming this signal is below 10 kHz I guess just any cable would do (might need some turns of electric tape to make it hefty enough for the clamp all along). I'm thinking a tv coax would do well here, quite rugged...

Thoughts?

(UPDATE: It's not the cable - read further)
 

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Thoughts?
Yea, what have you got to lose at this point? Worst case you have to buy the Kawi golden cable unit.Are you sure its not the sensor? If so,how close to the sensor are you willing to splice? You wanna make sure you get the fault. COAX is not a real 2 wire if you look at a diagram. I would cut the cable section out. You could at this point test the removed wire for faults too.Take the piece to electronics shop,buy the appropriate few feet of the wire. Any function of that wire they can illuminate. Get some shrink wrap to finish your solder splices,this is the secret sauce.
 

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So it's a cable issue and it's likely my fault as I left the caliper holder hanging by this cable while removing wheel...
I ended up buying two small 'bungee cords' specifically to use to suspend the brake calipers when I am removing wheels.

(y)(y)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Update:
The cable is a bit more than 3' and it's 5mm thick, so it's looks like it's rg-58 standard (if it is coax). I can find some at 40 cents per feet... LOL
I would prefer rg58 because I would be able to reuse the rubber sleeves to redo the clamping properly.
But I have no clear view of how I will splice both ends solid and clean.

The abs self diag didn't mention code 45 (faulty wiring) but I diag only after my last re-ignition trial, which passed (so the code would be cleared I think).
The code 35 came out (motor relay issue), but that could have been there for months, maybe years.
So I reset diag codes, made a quick skid test and all is working, and no code 35 after that.

I guess I'm good for another 5 years right? LOL
I will not touch it just yet I guess; I'll do another ride first, to shake it well...
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Ok, code 35 has been back twice now.
Not related to sensor cable.

Sometimes the abs is fine, then usually after bumps it goes off (code 35).

I found something very interrestin (jump at 35:24 if you want to get his summary)

Summary: the computer as an input line after the relay that feeds the pump motor. It expects 12v or 0v according to whether or not it has activated the relay.
But it cannot know the difference between a bad relay and bad brushes contact on the dc motor.

If the relay or any fuse was shot, I would never have abs working intermittently.
But because failures and recovery are related to shocking the bike's frame and thus abs motor, the brushes or bad frame ground are moving and changing the situation.

I'll check the grounds, but cleaning the abs dc motor brushes is probably beyond my reach. I would need some luck that it is only a ground or connector issue...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The more I search, the more I find that this is probably normal wear and that either brushes and/or the winding contacts are worn out (figure over 2000h of use...).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Something interesting happened. Not that it will solve anything, I still have to find a new abs pump...

With the assumption that the abs pump dc motor brushes are doing poor contact in certain position but not all of them, I managed to trick the abs module for the 1-2 seconds before it detect the fault after turning ignition on, during which I can activate the abs pump somehow (particularly on bumpy gravel road), thus rotating the motor a bit and changing the contacting brushes at random. This requires doing the maneuver while rolling and preferably on gravel with rear brake.

I`m usually capable of finding a non-error resting state within 2-3 tries. Dunno how many collectors there are on this tiny motor but i`ll presume 3 pairs at least.

I will certainly open up this thing and post once removed. My biggest problem after buying and installing, will be to unscrew the old motor. It`s a torx male head! Look like T15. I first have to find a long torx screw, then bend it allen-key like to make a wrench, because I have never seen a female torx screwdriver or bit. Hex 3mm or 3.5mm seem to fit, so I`ll try that first.
 

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I have a set of "CRAFTSMAN 'Power Bolt-Out' Damaged Bolt/Screw Remover Set" that look VERY much like what you need. Check around.

GOOD luck!
 

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Something interesting happened. Not that it will solve anything, I still have to find a new abs pump...

With the assumption that the abs pump dc motor brushes are doing poor contact in certain position but not all of them, I managed to trick the abs module for the 1-2 seconds before it detect the fault after turning ignition on, during which I can activate the abs pump somehow (particularly on bumpy gravel road), thus rotating the motor a bit and changing the contacting brushes at random. This requires doing the maneuver while rolling and preferably on gravel with rear brake.

I`m usually capable of finding a non-error resting state within 2-3 tries. Dunno how many collectors there are on this tiny motor but i`ll presume 3 pairs at least.

I will certainly open up this thing and post once removed. My biggest problem after buying and installing, will be to unscrew the old motor. It`s a torx male head! Look like T15. I first have to find a long torx screw, then bend it allen-key like to make a wrench, because I have never seen a female torx screwdriver or bit. Hex 3mm or 3.5mm seem to fit, so I`ll try that first.
Can you post a photo? I have a link here, a motor brush, the one I refer to has a U shaped connected to the pigtail. A common mistake with power tools was to insert the new brush with the pigtail twisted tight. A huge mistake, what happens is when the brush wears down, a slight out of round on the armature causes arcing, this arcing blows away copper/ brass on the low segments. First thing is untwist that pigtail Also it is possible to have a dead spot in the armature, my bet is it is a tight pigtail. When taking apart use caution, it is possible to have the brush end with a ball bearing which may come out and break the brush holder or brushes. Many times there are holes in the end bell, their sole purpose is to hold the brushes in the brush box while removing or installing. In the brush photo you will see the pigtail twisted. I worked in a electric motorshop for 9 years, many power tool repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks.
I am weeks from having a photo to show...
I'm scared a lot about even unmounting the unit, even more to open it up.

If I unmount, I have to bleed/refill abs from dry, which seems to be a lot more difficult than just a caliper bleed. I could end up with no brake at all for the rest of the season and spend winter trying to bleed abs from dry. I just read a case like that on another forum.

If I don't unmount but try to remove the motor alone, I have no clue if the motor comes out or if it is just a cover 'bell' as you say.
It the brushes stay on unit, I would have to work the rest in that awkward place.

Meanwhile, if I break anything, I'm out for weeks before I get a new one... and I'd be in the same abs bleeding position.

I wish I could see how it's made before trying anything. I just can't find disassembly clip about that model.
It almost makes me want to buy a dead unit just to see but who would sell that ever...
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Update:

The abs module replacement went on without any glitch. new unit works like a charm (I can actually feel the difference in abs pulsation, for having used a defective abs motor for so long).

a) bleeding dry: a few minutes with a vacuum hand pump. totally worth it. Pumpp pull -25psi easily and that quite enough.

b) unscrewing 4 pipes: that is a pita. you get 1/6 of turn with the wrench. About 10 threads = ~60 moves per pipe, 4 pipes... That is why it takes 2h to do the job... With a gauge hooked in the closed end of the 5.5in wrench I measured 24 lbs, which is pretty close to the spec 13 ft.lbs torque, forgiving the missing 0.5in on wrench length.

c) unmounting: 2 bolts with 4mm allen wrench, one of which under the left frame cover. The harness disconnect was a bit difficult, but not as much as the reconnect later! Once disconnected, there is a bit of trial and error to actually rotate/move the unit through the frame. The module itself is rubber-bushing mounted in it's bracket; be sure to observe well or take picture to remount.

d) mounting; the cable is hard to reinsert. be sure to align well and that you understand how the locking lever and tab work to avoid breaking this fragile plastic. It is tempting to start screwing pipes while unmounted because it gives a bit of space, but it's preferable that the module is mounted in order to put torque on the pipe nuts, and you can only torque one at a time. It's also easier to avoid cross threading them if the unit is in it's final levelled position.

e) screwing pipes: if you thought unscrewing was long, this is even worse. Now you have to avoid cross threading!

f) bleed to fill: I was worried about trapping air. Not at all an issue. I start the process with the vacuum pump until fluid come out. That is the faster way to prime the circuits. Then I finish with brake lever pumping because vacuum pump pulls air from the port's threads so you cannot tell when air is all out. Also you need to get the feel that air is gone (firm lever).

g) clear abs codes: the unit is the one storing codes, not the bike ecu. I checked just in case the new unit had any codes, but it was only the code 12 (normal). No clearing needed. (for abs codes process, you need the manual, or hope to have enough from some posts in howto section)

h) test: The ABS pump must run in case the module trapped some air. But if it did, I didn't feel it. I didn't need to re-bleed after test.

---
And the old module: the 2 nuts holding the motor bell cap are actually easy to remove with a 4mm socket (usually found in precision screwdrivers kits)
The REAL problem is that this cap is solidly glued to the abs alu body. I couldn't even insert a blade to begin prying it off, even with heating the rim with a butane torch...
I don't feel like destroying it just yet. So, no view of how it's made, and no hope to fix brushes.
 
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