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Discussion Starter #1
Yeah this has to be the best bang for your buck mod...for our harsh stock shock ..

I went to E Bay and bought a Yamaha 2008 R1 rear shock for $ 50 bucks..

Took it down to the local machinist to drill out the eyelets to 12 mm...$ 40 bucks..

Bingo..set the preload to max and if your like me ...solo rider and 160 lbs. the R1 spring will be a little soft..

However , I get a 50 mm rider sag and the compression and rebound is fun to play with...

This is my second R1 shock transplant and the results are brilliant..

Plush , compliant , and you can source a better spring cheap too..

Thanks to this wonderful forum and the great sharing of info..you guys rock !:wink2:

 
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Is the length the same as the stock shock? Is that all you need to do is drill out the eyelets to 12mm both ends?

I've gotten a big improvement in my bike by backing off preload on the front shock slightly and the preload in the rear slightly. I'm probably close to 190lb all geared up. I ride on a lot of bumpy, frost heaved pavement and it just seems to make the bike feel more planted on this kind of road.
 

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Took it down to the local machinist to drill out the eyelets to 12 mm...
the hardened stainless bushing can't be drilled, so your machinist bored it to 12mm. the fixed conventional bushing can be drilled since it's just mild steel, A36 or equivalent, but must be done very carefully or the bushing sleeve will not be concentric at 12mm. i have drilled this bushing early on when using the R1, but since you're left with a very thing sidewall, more recently i've been replacing the conventional bushing on the R1 with the needle bearing assembly from the Versys/ER6 shock. this needle bearing needs to be fitted on the R1, but the stainless bushing is set to go at 12mm. once fitted, the OEM grease seals are used.

i've run the R1 shock both ways, but i think swapping in the new bearing assembly is the better solution.
 

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Another thing you should do when installing the R1 shock - use some washer(s) at the TOP mount, on the OUTBOARD side, to give clearance so that the top of the shock doesn't wear thru from contacting the frame.
 

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more recently i've been replacing the conventional bushing on the R1 with the needle bearing assembly from the Versys/ER6 shock. this needle bearing needs to be fitted on the R1, but the stainless bushing is set to go at 12mm. once fitted, the OEM grease seals are used.
I was thinking of doing that for mine but was wondering what to do about the width (thickness of the shock eyelet). The Versys shock end is wider (thicker) than the one on the R1 shock. Would the Versys needle bearing inside sleeve be wider than the R1 shock end?

Thank you
 

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I was thinking of doing that for mine but was wondering what to do about the width (thickness of the shock eyelet). The Versys shock end is wider (thicker) than the one on the R1 shock. Would the Versys needle bearing inside sleeve be wider than the R1 shock end?

Thank you
no, the needle bearing, 12mm ID sleeve, and grease seals swap right over to the R1 after the R1 shock end is bored to exactly match the the ID of the Versys/ER6 shock end. the needle bearing can be purchased new from any parts house if you don't want to use the bearing from your Versys shock. even the OEM Versys 16kg spring will swap to the R1, and that's the spring i run for the way i use the bike..
 

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no, the needle bearing, 12mm ID sleeve, and grease seals swap right over to the R1 after the R1 shock end is bored to exactly match the the ID of the Versys/ER6 shock end.
R1 shock left with OEM fixed bushing removed and then bored to the correct ID.

the needle bearing can be purchased new from any parts house if you don't want to use the bearing from your Versys shock.
I was under the impression that the R1 shock end did not need to be bored. Instead of getting my R1 shock end bored, I guess I will get a new needle bearing for it. That's what I did for the other end (very easy to do).

Thank you very much! Great information! :)
 

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I was under the impression that the R1 shock end did not need to be bored. Instead of getting my R1 shock end bored, I guess I will get a new needle bearing for it. That's what I did for the other end (very easy to do).

Thank you very much! Great information! :)
the R1 shock uses M10 mounting bolts on both ends, the Versys shock mounts use M12 mounting bolts on both ends.

you're going to do something to both ends of the R1 for use on the Versys, but what you decide to do is up to you.

i'd like to see the new needle bearing assembly you used to replace the OEM R1 needle bearing/sleeve.
 

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the R1 shock uses M10 mounting bolts on both ends, the Versys shock mounts use M12 mounting bolts on both ends.
I was aware of that. Thanks!

you're going to do something to both ends of the R1 for use on the Versys, but what you decide to do is up to you.
I was able to replace the OEM R1 needle bearing/sleeve without needing to have that R1 shock end bored. I dearly hope that the other end will permit me to do the same thing (not needing to have the R1 shock end bored).

i'd like to see the new needle bearing assembly you used to replace the OEM R1 needle bearing/sleeve.
It's a NBS needle bearing NA6901 (outside diameter = 24 mm, inside diameter of sleeve= 12 mm, width = 22 mm

Attached are a few pics. I now realize that I will need to take another pic of the newly installed needle bearing because the sleeve slid to the bottom. This pic makes it seem like the sleeve is too short. :eek:

Thank you! :)

 

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the photos i posted are an option for dealing with the conventional bushing end on the R1. i've always bored the OEM R1 sleeve to 12mm on the opposite end.

typical cost $20
I know about the sleeve needing to be 12mm. However I thought that you were talking about boring the R1 shock end to accept the new needle bearing. I'll know when I get my other needle bearing.
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Is the length the same as the stock shock? Is that all you need to do is drill out the eyelets to 12mm both ends?

I've gotten a big improvement in my bike by backing off preload on the front shock slightly and the preload in the rear slightly. I'm probably close to 190lb all geared up. I ride on a lot of bumpy, frost heaved pavement and it just seems to make the bike feel more planted on this kind of road.
Yeah the stock Versys shock has some valving issues ..poor compression and rebound specs for some reason...not too bad, however the R1 shock is a cheap , fun project to try out..

You at 190 lbs will need to swap the spring off the R1 shock...it's really soft..

Give it a shot and you will feel a more compliant ride...and it's fun to play with the adjustments...

My 60 year old spine says two thumbs up on the magic carpet ride ..:wink2:
 

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What are the years to look out for for the R1 shocks? I see ones with oem yellow springs, gray springs, etc...I am 145 lbs and 155ish with full gear if that helps any.
 

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Just food for thought guys, these 40-50 dollar shocks are 8-9 years old and the ones I have seen on e-bay that have not been cleaned up show signs of oil seepage around the seal head, the highest wear item in a shock.
Seal heads are available for around 40-50 dollars. I always use race tech parts for my fork/shock rebuilds.
All of these shocks are going to need this, but this is where the problem starts. Most but not all of the time the shock leaking fluid begins the galling of the shock body by the piston internally. No way of telling with out disassembly.

If the body is galled you are done.
Not to mention the safety hazards of riding a bike with a leaking-claped out shock that is "spring only action"
I have overhauled and modified hundreds of shocks and forks both road race guys and motocrossers.
No look more disappointing than when i have to tell someone that the shock-fork has been abused beyond repair.

I don't claim to be a expert.

Not trying to step on toes or make waves, just trying to point something out that can be a serious safety issue.
Be safe watch out for cagers and have fun with whatever you ride, I am
Markie
 

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no, the needle bearing, 12mm ID sleeve, and grease seals swap right over to the R1 after the R1 shock end is bored to exactly match the the ID of the Versys/ER6 shock end.
I asked the machinist to bore the R1 shock end. However he did not feel at ease with this. He told me that the shock did not have enough meat to clamp it down, etc. I then asked if he could make me a bronze bushing that would fit the R1 shock end and also have an ID of 12 mm. He replied that this would be easy to do.

Voilà:





Thanks for your tips, suggestions, etc. It was much appreciated! :)
 

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^^ When I did the GSXR shock swap on my 250R race bike I had some sleeve bushings made up that sleeved up the 10mm bolt to 12mm OD to match the frame mounting ID. Worked like a charm and did not require modification to the shock or the shock mount.
 

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^^ When I did the GSXR shock swap on my 250R race bike I had some sleeve bushings made up that sleeved up the 10mm bolt to 12mm OD to match the frame mounting ID. Worked like a charm and did not require modification to the shock or the shock mount.
That's good!
In your case, you had a shock with 12 mm holes which are bigger than your frame bolts (10 mm). In this case, it's the opposite way around. The R1 shock mount holes (10 mm) need to be modified (enlarged) to accept the larger Versys frame bolts (12 mm).
 
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