Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
I've been thinking about using one of the lowering kits for my V and am wondering why it's necessary to lower the front also? Is there really any reason to do so other than maintain the looks of the bike?
Is there a handling reason? A friend has a motowerks lowering block on the back but has done nothing with the front and I can't really see the difference in his and mine.
Thanks for any info and pointers.

cliff in Ky
'08 Versys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
Lowering the front suspension is not hard if you know what you are doing, and a second pair of hands is very helpful if you don't. Since there is no way to conveniently jack up the bike from underneath to take the pressure off the front suspension, you have to lower the fork clamps (lower triple tree) slowly. If you loosen the clamp too much (guilty :eek: ) it will slide down quickly and too far, and then you'll need to figure out some way to take the pressure off the front suspension to move it back where you want it.

You can suspend the bike from above but that isn't an option in my garage. Redline had a brilliantly simple solution (he pivoted the bike on the sidestand and rear tire while I made the adjustment up front). Never could have done that alone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,193 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
On my 2010 V, I installed Speedy's lowering kit, and lowered the front following Speedy's instructions, easily with no problem. I lowered the front simply to get the seat height down a bit more. For my riding, mostly below 60 mph on twisty back roads, there's never been a handling problem. Also fine a couple of times at 90mph on the interstate.

Then I installed a HyperPro progressive lowering spring on the rear, which lowered the rear another 30mm (1.25"). Bike is lower. Handling is fine. I'm sure a gourmet rider could see a difference, but I couldn't. I liked the ride comfort with the progressive rear springs, so I installed HyperPro progressive, 30mm lowering springs in the front. Lowered the front 30mm, eliminated most of the "dive" when front braking, improved ride comfort some more, but otherwise could not see any difference in handling.

So, while lowering the rear changes the "rake" I didn't see any effect on handling. I say lower the front, if you need to lower the seat-height more. Otherwise, don't worry about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,762 Posts
I've been thinking about using one of the lowering kits for my V and am wondering why it's necessary to lower the front also? Is there really any reason to do so other than maintain the looks of the bike?
I lowered the front to keep the geometry closer to original.

See post 2 here for an easy lower if you by chance have a triple tree front stand. Made it a 5 minute job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
Its a one man job and the front end doesn't need to be off the ground if you follow the instructions...https://www.motowerk.com/uploads/Kawasaki_Versys_Instructions_for_Lowering_the_Front_Suspension.pdf
Yes, I had those instructions. The problem I had is the author's idea of "loosen" is considerably tighter than mine. There's a caution about not loosening both sides at once, but nothing about loosening one side too much. Never having worked on motorcycle forks before, I found myself with less information than I needed.

With hindsight, I recommend cracking both hex head bolts on one side and trying to slide the fork up/triple tree down. If it won't slide, go another 1/8th turn and try again, and so on until you can make the desired adjustment. If you simply "loosen" the bolts, the triple tree can slip down too quickly and too far and you won't be able to move it up without taking the weight off the front suspension.

Just trying to share information so others don't make the mistake I did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,762 Posts
Just trying to share information so others don't make the mistake I did.
Very good on you sir! :usa: I had someone looking out for me before I did it as well. One of the reasons I went ahead and bought a combo front stand that can lift by the forks or the triple tree. Right tools for the job means easy work and down the road, I will be able to pull the front wheel for other maintenance and tire changes as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Tigerpawed, no need to "sorry" on that one... I rather enjoyed that google query... Quite slick.
Onto the question .. I watched the motowerks info on how to lower the front and we can lift the frame but I was trying to figure out just why and if it was important to lower the front other than a little lower seating position.
Basically it appears to me that it isn't critical to drop it unless you're riding the bike near it's limits.
Thanks all...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Yes, I had those instructions. The problem I had is the author's idea of "loosen" is considerably tighter than mine. There's a caution about not loosening both sides at once, but nothing about loosening one side too much. Never having worked on motorcycle forks before, I found myself with less information than I needed.

With hindsight, I recommend cracking both hex head bolts on one side and trying to slide the fork up/triple tree down. If it won't slide, go another 1/8th turn and try again, and so on until you can make the desired adjustment. If you simply "loosen" the bolts, the triple tree can slip down too quickly and too far and you won't be able to move it up without taking the weight off the front suspension.

Just trying to share information so others don't make the mistake I did.
You can hedge your bets a little by slipping a length of 1x6x36+/- under the wheel after you lift. Then you can wedge it up to support the tire after the clamps are loose.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top