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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had a thread earlier this year, https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/208802-polaris-regulator-good-used.html?highlight=regulators , once the 4016868 came out I lost interest as the 4016868 is half the price of the older 4012941 Polaris. However for installing on the MK-1 and MK-2 the 4012941 is more suited. I did a post earlier today:

I provided a link before and depending on what you are replacing the stator with, I would suggest going with a used Polaris 4012941 regulator. If you wish I can find a good used legit one, for every 100 4012941 regulators on Ebay, 96 of them are fake, just a FYI. For a while I was posting a link for good used verified by me regulators.https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/208802-polaris-regulator-good-used.html?highlight=regulators

The 4012941 is more suited to the 2007 to 2014 Versys than the new Polaris 4016868 which is a higher output current and half the price of the 4012941. My plan is to do a install How To on the 4106868 this winter, like I said the older Polaris is more suited, however we have had one person do a how to on the 40169868 for the MK-2 Versys


If there is enough interest I will find some legit Polaris regulators and update that thread. Just that the last time there was no response from members, it takes me a good hour to search and in some cases I contacted the seller to update a photo. My time is important to me.

:feedback:
 

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I am interested. It's starting to get cold here and I was planning to install mine in January.

Randy
 

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As a victim of a fake one your efforts are appreciated. I now have about 40k miles on a legit one and appreciate all of the info and howto's.
 
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The 4012941 is more suited to the 2007 to 2014 Versys than the new Polaris 4016868 which is a higher output current and half the price of the 4012941.
Is one or the other of these better suited for the 2015+ ?

I need to do this mod this winter and had better start shopping for a regulator!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Is one or the other of these better suited for the 2015+ ?

I need to do this mod this winter and had better start shopping for a regulator!
the 4012941 is suited for all models, however it is double the cost of the 4016868 , and I think it may be out of production, as the 4016868 is 50 amp output and the price what the 941 use to be. Big problem on the MK-1&2, the 50 amp has a larger footprint and the cooling fins are 90' of OEM. I intend to install the 68 in the next month on my 2015 and will post photos and result. Presently I have the CompuFire series regulator installed off my 07, it has given me 45,000 KM of trouble free riding, that may come up for sale although it may be mid July 2019.
So the 4012941 has years of proven test results and fits all Versys models, however the new $ is ridiculous, also for every 1 legit there are 99 fake ones on Ebay, most used 4012941 are going for the price of a new 4016868 which happens to be more efficient and higher output.
 

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Why is the Polaris OEM regulator abetter option than the Kawi unit?
 

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Why is the Polaris OEM regulator abetter option than the Kawi unit?
Uh oh, now you've done it!

The Reader's Digest version is that the factory configuration has the alternator running 100% all the time. If your electronic gizmos on the bike don't need all that power (and usually they only use about half the power), the excess power is dissipated as heat. Heat being the enemy, the OEM alternator tends to fail after a few years.

The Polaris system isn't quite a bolt-on replacement, but it can be done. The Polaris uses a different electric circuit so that the alternator only produces the power being demanded, so it runs cooler and lasts a long time.

FWIW, it is not a mod I've done on my bike. Yes there is a higher failure rate with OEM, but I am willing to take the chance. I have however installed a voltmeter to keep an eye on things. If the alternator starts to fail it can show up as low voltage. Sometimes the failure can be instantaneous, but again it is a risk I'm willing to take.

YMMV, IANAL, etc.
 

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If you spend an extra $15 on a Triumph RR wiring harness it is very easy. That takes care of wiring up the new plugs, you then only have to connect 5 wires from the factory harness to the Triumph RR wires and its done. I will solder and heat shrink the wires and itll take 30 mins. Have done this on my KLR also its worth the peace of mind when adding power-sucking accessories :thumb:
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Almost 100 % Correct

If you spend an extra $15 on a Triumph RR wiring harness it is very easy. That takes care of wiring up the new plugs, you then only have to connect 5 wires from the factory harness to the Triumph RR wires and its done. I will solder and heat shrink the wires and itll take 30 mins. Have done this on my KLR also its worth the peace of mind when adding power-sucking accessories :thumb:
All 650 Kawasaki motorcycles are wired the same, KLR, Ninja, Versys, the positive output of the regulator is directly connected to the 30 amp main fuse and is live 24/7. Since the headlight relay uses the positive terminal of the start solenoid for the relay ground, and the fact that 1 phase of the stator is connected through a series of diodes to the headlight relay, switching to a series regulator [ which uses the DC output to drive the electronics],

A discharge circuit becomes enabled through this headlight relay, about 0.036 amp, enough to kill the battery in 7 to 10 days, what is more important is you should never rapidly charge a deeply discharged motorcycle battery, this will happen every time you start, so there are now 3 solutions to eliminate this parasitic drain.
The last one involves cutting into the start solenoid ground and installing a normally open relay powered by you taillight.
 

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All 650 Kawasaki motorcycles are wired the same, KLR, Ninja, Versys, the positive output of the regulator is directly connected to the 30 amp main fuse and is live 24/7. Since the headlight relay uses the positive terminal of the start solenoid for the relay ground, and the fact that 1 phase of the stator is connected through a series of diodes to the headlight relay, switching to a series regulator [ which uses the DC output to drive the electronics],

A discharge circuit becomes enabled through this headlight relay, about 0.036 amp, enough to kill the battery in 7 to 10 days, what is more important is you should never rapidly charge a deeply discharged motorcycle battery, this will happen every time you start, so there are now 3 solutions to eliminate this parasitic drain.
The last one involves cutting into the start solenoid ground and installing a normally open relay powered by you taillight.
Dude, can I like, bring my bike to you with some parts and just watch you work? Just tell me what it'll take!
 

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Dude, can I like, bring my bike to you with some parts and just watch you work? Just tell me what it'll take!
It will take a PRETTY LONG ride, from MO to Ontario....:wink2:
 
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