Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

61 - 69 of 69 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
748 Posts
the FAA is behind the times. ya, thats because we have people in office that think regulation is a burdon. they think that removing regulations and letting business self correct is the best way to go, and that any intervention from government is bad. in order to meet that political obvective they put "friendly" people in charge when ever possible, and reduce funding for the watchdogs. if something goes wrong, they step back and say something like.... see, they don't help anyway, time to get rid of it all together. it's happening right now to a greater extent than ever
I guess Im dealing with the wrong FSDO.lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
ha ha... doesn't extend down to the FSDO level. only good for manufacturers or somebody rich enough to get a lobbiest with some clout. one of the factors that is being discussed on this Boeing thing is "self regulation" during the certification process... they (Boeing) gets to decide whats going to work, with no oversight. you and I will never get that kind of treatment
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shibumik and turn8a

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,433 Posts
I know this pic has no bearing on the previous post, but I thought you MIGHT enjoy it....

I was 'crew' on this C-130 doing a JATO take-off during the '69 Abbotsford Airshow w/ an OV-10A Bronco in the foreground - pic was taken by a staff photographer from the Vancouver PROVINCE newspaper.



Our 'show' was the JATO in a short-field takeoff, followed awhile later by a max-effort short-field landing, and as we came to a stop - released the brakes and backed off the runway onto the grass beside it. As MOST people had never seen an a/c backup - we were the "stars" of the show each day!

We did SIX shows PLUS a rehearsal show, so I got to be part of burning 56 JATO rockets. LOTS of 'sturm und drang'...!

:thumb: - :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,233 Posts
I was 'crew' on this C-130 doing a JATO take-off during the '69 Abbotsford Airshow w/ an OV-10A Bronco in the foreground - pic was taken by a staff photographer from the Vancouver PROVINCE newspaper.
I've marveled at those JATO take-offs. Must have been a real fun ride!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,433 Posts
I've marveled at those JATO take-offs. Must have been a real fun ride!
We "lit the fires" just as we rotated at a VERY low weight, so it was like an F-104 in 'burner', making LOTS OF NOISE, then at about 1,000' AGL the burn ended (NOT all eight at the same time!), so we 'pushed-over' into a 'normal' short-field climb. LOTS of black smoke as the burn ended!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,000 Posts


Air Transportation Safety Investigation Report A19O0026

COLLISION WITH TERRAIN Robinson Helicopter Company R66 (helicopter), C-GAUA Timmins (Victor M. Power) Airport, Ontario, 18 nm WNW 04 March 2019

The helicopter was not certified to fly under instrument flight rules (IFR) and was not equipped with an autopilot. A portable GPS (global positioning system) device was mounted beside the instrument cluster and found at the accident site. There were no pre-impact mechanical failures or system malfunctions identified that would have contributed to this accident.

Accident site and aircraft wreckage information

… There was tree damage at the top of a coniferous tree located approximately 10 m (33 feet) westnorthwest of the impact site (Figure 2). The tree damage and the damage to the helicopter indicated that the aircraft was in a steep nose-down, left-bank attitude when it struck the ground, on an approximate heading of 120° magnetic. The helicopter then pitched over and came to rest on its back. The tail boom had snapped at approximately the midpoint, and there was minor damage to the tail rotor. The main rotor blades were mostly buried in the snow, but showed significant damage when uncovered. All portions of the main rotor blades were still attached to the mast, which was partially separated from the helicopter. The gearbox and the engine (Rolls Royce RR-300) had broken free of their mounts. There was a strong odour of jet fuel at the site. The flight instruments were examined to determine their readings at the time of impact; however, the only useful information obtained was from the airspeed indicator, which showed a reading of 107 knots at impact. The occupants were ejected from the helicopter during the impact. There is no evidence that either occupant had been wearing a seatbelt at the time of the occurrence; however, given the damage to the helicopter, the accident was not survivable.

Night visual flight rules

The occurrence flight took place at night over remote areas with almost no ambient or cultural sources of light from the ground. Illumination from the moon was negligible13 and the nearest major light source was the city of Timmins, which is 18 nm east-southeast of the accident site. The Robinson R66 Pilot’s Operating Handbook states the following regarding night VFR and what happens when outside visual reference is lost: [the pilot] loses […] his ability to control the attitude of the helicopter. As helicopters are not inherently stable and have very high roll rates, the aircraft will quickly go out of control, resulting in a high velocity crash which is usually fatal.

Air transportation safety investigation report A19O0026 - Transportation Safety Board of Canada
 
61 - 69 of 69 Posts
Top