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I just did my 600 mi oil change on my new Versys 650 and looked to check the oil level and found the window fogged up. Not sure how long it's been like this. Picture attached below. Any one else see have this problem? Haveing trouble reading the level.
 

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I just did my 600 mi oil change on my new Versys 650 and looked to check the oil level and found the window fogged up. Not sure how long it's been like this. Picture attached below. Any one else see have this problem? Haveing trouble reading the level.
I had the same thing happen in cooler weather. I was assured it is normal and not a problem. :cool:
 

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I just did my 600 mi oil change on my new Versys 650 and looked to check the oil level and found the window fogged up. Not sure how long it's been like this. Picture attached below. Any one else see have this problem? Haveing trouble reading the level.
It WILL happen after a "cold-ride" IF the oil doesn't get HOT enough. Solution? Ride a few miles FURTHER...!

The temps here in AZ have been cold enough for that to happen, so I USUALLY just add another couple of miles at the end of a shorter ride.
 

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Yes, I remember this was covered in another thread and that it was not a problem. You might try the advanced search function to see if you can find that thread. It might have offered some ideas for taking care of the problem. Not to be too basic, but have you stepped over the bike and tilted it left and right to splash the inside of the little window with some oil? Have you gotten some heat in the engine to see if the fogging evaporates or gets absorbed?
 

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this is normal in cold weather. It is more noticeable after short rides. the reason is cold condensation. the oil has to get up to temp ( warm enough for the fan to kick on)in order to heat the condensation out of the oil. Nothing to worry about. When the weather warms up, take a long spirited ride to get the oil up to evaporation temperature. My Harleys don't have sight glass, but in cold weather and short rides the oil will have a slight milky color. A good, long, hard ride and the oil will look normal again.
 

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It is condensation. A very common problem where short trips are taken in a cold climate.

Is it a problem? Moisture in the crankcase. Certainly it is not a desirable situation. All you need to do is to occasionally take your bike for a good long hot engine run.
 

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Unless you install a Thermo-Bob, stock cooling system does not have a proper radiator bypass for efficient warm up in colder weather... Covering part of your radiator will help achieve and maintain normal operating temperature. Oil must reach a temperature of at least 212F (100C) to evaporate any water accumulation at least once during your ride.

Cover up bottom half of your radiator until you're back above 50F ambient temperatures, and let me know how it turns out... It'll also be much better for the engine.
 

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Unless you install a Thermo-Bob, stock cooling system does not have a proper radiator bypass for efficient warm up in colder weather... Covering part of your radiator will help achieve and maintain normal operating temperature. Oil must reach a temperature of at least 212F (100C) to evaporate any water accumulation at least once during your ride.

Cover up bottom half of your radiator until you're back above 50F ambient temperatures, and let me know how it turns out... It'll also be much better for the engine.
I can confirm with my bike that has the thermobob 3 installed, this still happens as well. That is even after a 25 mile ride. I'll just have to look forward to my next oil change and warmer weather for this fogging to subside. Probably a little bit too much water in the oil that can't all necessarily be boiled off.
 
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