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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I installed a set of Kawasaki OEM heated grips on my 2011 Versys. They are not working as expected. They provide barely adequate heat in the highest setting. My previous experience with heated grips is that they get uncomfortably warm in the highest setting. I verified that I followed the installation procedures to the letter. Has anyone had experience with the OEM heated grips? Is there a way I can test / verify that they are working properly?
 

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I have not tried the OEM grips. I've had the same results as you on other grips. The high setting normally gets too hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Took an evening ride with outdoor temp at 45 degrees. While riding with the grips set at highest temp, the grips were feeling barely warm. I'd like to sort out if I have a problem without going to the dealer. Since I installed them myself they are not under warranty unless I can demonstrate that they are defective.
 

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I have aftermarket heated grips but the wiring diagram was wrong so LO was the high setting and HI was low. Redline (forum member) had the same problem. Don't know if that's an issue with yours, but worth double checking (a) if you have the wires connected properly, and (b) whether LO and HI are reversed.

If your handlebars are out in the wind, the heat the grips are putting out gets blown away, especially as speed increases. Also, if you're riding in town and doing a lot of shifting and braking, your hands leave the warm grips for the cold clutch and brake levers. That can make it seem like your grips aren't working very well.
 

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Since I installed them myself they are not under warranty unless I can demonstrate that they are defective.
I know how that feels.
I put a pair of Oxford Heaterz on. The worked fine for two hours or so (really hot & comfy) and then started blowing fuses, even after having disconnected both left and right grip. Must be the troller I guess. Properly hooked up, but how do I convince the eBay seller. Does he reply when I contact? Not....
Luckily I found pretty cheap ones on amazon.co.uk. Hope they will last longer.

A couple of days ago the Blaster-X tail light proved to be defective. Read more under my thread "Blaster-X" here on Technical discussion.
 

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Took an evening ride with outdoor temp at 45 degrees. While riding with the grips set at highest temp, the grips were feeling barely warm. I'd like to sort out if I have a problem without going to the dealer. Since I installed them myself they are not under warranty unless I can demonstrate that they are defective.
They should definitely get warmer than you are describing. My Oxfords on the 75% setting almost fry my hands and 40% is usually okay.
The only way be be sure is if you have a multimeter, measure the amp draw and voltage when they are on and calculate the wattage they are drawing. Somewhere on the package or of the web you should be able to find their rated watts.
This way you can be sure if they are defective before you take it in.
ps the watts are amps x voltage.
 

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I installed a set of Kawasaki OEM heated grips on my 2011 Versys. They are not working as expected. They provide barely adequate heat in the highest setting. My previous experience with heated grips is that they get uncomfortably warm in the highest setting. I verified that I followed the installation procedures to the letter. Has anyone had experience with the OEM heated grips? Is there a way I can test / verify that they are working properly?
Did you solder the connections? A bad connection will heat up and use up half the power before it even gets to the grips due to high current draw of heated grips (~4-5 amps) and the extra resistance caused by a bad connection. An unsoldered twisted wire connection is pretty much guaranteed to fail with time, vibration and corrosion as are those wire connectors that pinch the wire's insulation to form a connection. Nothing beats soldering for a reliable, low resistance connection. Also they need to be wired directly to the battery or via a power block connected the battery for this same reason.

 

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I have aftermarket heated grips but the wiring diagram was wrong so LO was the high setting and HI was low. Redline (forum member) had the same problem. Don't know if that's an issue with yours, but worth double checking (a) if you have the wires connected properly, and (b) whether LO and HI are reversed.
I've seen similar with other grips when installed by people unfamiliar with this stuff.

Hi & Lo are marked on the toggle side of the switch, but the terminals on the back side are typically opposite. Someone familiar with this sort of thing would either test the switch leads before wiring it up, or assume the correct connections because they know how the toggle switch works (when you push the toggle to one side, the switching part pivots the other way and connects the contacts on the other side). But it seems to be a common mistake to assume the contacts match the switch labeling on the top.

I think the OEM grips have a knob to twist rather than a Hi-Lo toggle?

OP: Check everything: the resistance of the heating elements, the current draw when things are on, see if the voltage on the power side of the switch drops when you turn the grips on, your electrical connections, etc.
 

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If blowing fuses, double check the ground and make sure it is rock solid with high quality wire and terminals. Might have to "improve" current ground, or run ground wire to battery post. Had an E-tech tell me a long time ago, 90% of all electrical problems are usually a ground fault of one kind or another.
 

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Hi & Lo are marked on the toggle side of the switch, but the terminals on the back side are typically opposite. Someone familiar with this sort of thing would either test the switch leads before wiring it up, or assume the correct connections because they know how the toggle switch works (when you push the toggle to one side, the switching part pivots the other way and connects the contacts on the other side). But it seems to be a common mistake to assume the contacts match the switch labeling on the top.
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FWIW, here's the diagram, which looks pretty straightforward and resulted in reversed output.
 

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Let me just steal this thread once more. I complained about Oxford grips previously. The reason to why the seller did not respond immediately was that he wanted to clear things out with the Oxford Rep in the US. Now when this is done he came back to me in a very positive way, everything will be taken care of. I do recommend bying your grips from Steve, owner, www.classiccycleparts.com. He's a very friendly guy!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The grips are plug and play and I applied great due diligence to ensure that I followed the directions to the letter. I’ve not messed around much with electrical systems. Where do I connect the multi-meter to do the diagnostics you’ve suggested?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
They are plug and play and came with a relay. Not much chance that I hooked them up wrong. I've determined that the Versys comes with a stator that puts out 336 watts. All the other OEM electronics on the bike (lights, ECU, etc) use 285 watts. Consequently there is not much excess electrical capacity for other stuff. Wondering if that is a factor in my problem.
 

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The grips are plug and play and I applied great due diligence to ensure that I followed the directions to the letter. I’ve not messed around much with electrical systems. Where do I connect the multi-meter to do the diagnostics you’ve suggested?
They are plug and play and came with a relay. Not much chance that I hooked them up wrong. I've determined that the Versys comes with a stator that puts out 336 watts. All the other OEM electronics on the bike (lights, ECU, etc) use 285 watts. Consequently there is not much excess electrical capacity for other stuff. Wondering if that is a factor in my problem.
Hook a voltmeter up to the battery and go for a ride. Turn everything on and see if the Voltage is still at 13V or so. If the voltage drops to 12V you are not charging the battery anymore.

I run heated grips, heated vest, GPS, Denali lights, Admorelighting LED tail lights in my Givi V35s all at the same time. I have over 7000 miles on the bike.

The other thing you could do is meaure the temperature output from the grips. This is a relative reading though because they will get hotter as the ambient temperature climbs.

Also, which way did you point the wire that comes out of the grip? Mine are in front of the grip pointing downward.
 
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