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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Uggh....Classic. I'm all ready to put the tires back on and realize my torque wrench only goes up to 75 foot pounds. Looks like I'll be buying yet ANOTHER new tool today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
A rider friend of mine just said "you're crazy....Those specs are only for lawyers!" He said his Yamaha mechanic told him that they would NEVER torque an engine sprocket to over 70-75 foot pounds....interesting.
 

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A rider friend of mine just said "you're crazy....Those specs are only for lawyers!" He said his Yamaha mechanic told him that they would NEVER torque an engine sprocket to over 70-75 foot pounds....interesting.

The only thing i've ever used a torgue wrench on is the sparks plugs. Everything else by feel.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
seriously? Wow....I am WAAAY to paranoid I think. I've been torquing
EVERYTHING to specs so far.
 

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seriously? Wow....I am WAAAY to paranoid I think. I've been torquing
EVERYTHING to specs so far.
I would SERIOUSLY recommend that you ALWAYS use your 1/4" torque wrench for ANY fastener requiring "inch/pounds".

:goodidea:
 

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Just use your torque wrench to tighten it to 75 ft-lbs, then give it a little extra 15 ft-lbs nudge and you'll be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
As it stands, I have the back wheel raised up, front sprocket hand tightened, rear sprocket torqued and rear axle hand tightened. This is the time to fully torque the front sprocket so I can then put the new chain on, correct?
- Use the block of wood method to stop the wheel from turning and fully torque front sprocket
- Install new chain
- Align and adjust chain tension
- Final torque of rear wheel

Right?
 

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Use your torque wrench, particularly on the small critical bolts with inch/pound settings, as Fast Eddie advised. There is a reason the manufacturer provides those numbers. We are dealing with many metals of differing hardness. If you ignore them you may find yourself in the rookie mechanic's situation: tightened the nut until it stripped, then backed off half a turn! I learned that lesson the hard way many years ago when I stripped the drain plug in my Norton (actually the crankcase aluminum stripped, the bolt was fine!)
 

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seriously? Wow....I am WAAAY to paranoid I think. I've been torquing
EVERYTHING to specs so far.
That's not paranoia, it's smart and cautious. I'm not surprised that some wrenches in dealer shops feel that they don't need to bother with torque, and that is one reason that I have not had a mechanic touch any motorcycle I have owned for the past 40+ years. I don't need tough talking idiots turning a wrench on my machines, too many true horror stories for my liking. I'm certain that there are many fine mechanics out there, but with a workshop manual and the proper tools I don't need to filter through the bad ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Right on, thanks.
So, should I completely torque down the front sprocket with the rear wheel still off the ground and use the block of wood method or should I hand tighten the sprocket and rear wheel, take it off the pit stand, tighten the front sprocket, and then lift it back up to do all the chain adjustment and rear wheel torquing...?
 

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Right on, thanks.
So, should I completely torque down the front sprocket with the rear wheel still off the ground and use the block of wood method or should I hand tighten the sprocket and rear wheel, take it off the pit stand, tighten the front sprocket, and then lift it back up to do all the chain adjustment and rear wheel torquing...?
You could try, but you might find it's not stable enough to torque front sprocket nut without smashing your Versys to the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I put a piece of wood through the spokes and didn't have any problems. It was harder to get that stupid washer flattened around the front sprocket nut again! First time riveting a master link too, I think I got it good enough. I guess there's no way to really tell except that I see the tips are flared and the master link still moves freely like the rest of the links. The nice part about doing all this, is I GUARANTEE that I take more time and care much more about all these little things than your average mechanic probably would on someone else's bike! Thanks for all the help.
 

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I just ordered a chain and sprocket kit but it doesn’t have the rubber bushing, so I’ve ordered another front sprocket with rubber, I can now keep the one without rubber as a spare for when I’m travelling around Europe etc. Great post on a subject I know little about but know a bit more from reading the post!
 

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I did not notice any noise with front sprocket without the rubber. i think the noise is so negligible than no one can notice it.
 

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The ONLY "rubber" sprockets I have run, were the ORIGINAL ones. ALL my replacements were/are just steel.
 

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The ONLY "rubber" sprockets I have run, were the ORIGINAL ones. ALL my replacements were/are just steel.
Same here. Never had any issue with them either. Buy quality parts and your fine in the long run.

I did not notice any noise with front sprocket without the rubber. i think the noise is so negligible than no one can notice it.
And if you have as much hearing loss as I do it doesn't matter because you can't hear it anyway. :p
 

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Same here. Never had any issue with them either. Buy quality parts and your fine in the long run.



And if you have as much hearing loss as I do it doesn't matter because you can't hear it anyway. :p

yea, I run too many free flow pipes in my life on my bikes. also with 650 I have Leo vince exhaust, so it is louder than what is happening in the front sprocket. but some say that having rubber reduces vibrations. i don't know if that is true. In 650 I replaced the rear sprocket so the front is still OEM.
 
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