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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at my OEM front sprocket and my new front sprocket, it looks like the OEM has rubber on each side, where the aftermarket does not(I think invader mentioned this in another post)....Is this going to cause any problems?
 

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The OEM rubber damped (not rubber mounted) 15T (also available in 16T) is quiet and smooth operating compared to a non-damped front sprocket... No significant problems, but the noise may bother you. The damped OEM sprocket is likely more durable and easier on the chain as well, which is partly supported and damped on the rubber puck on both sides.
 

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I'm not familiar with that sprocket brand, but that RK chain is what I've been using on my track bike. It's a good chain, one of the highest tensile strength 520 chains.

There will be no issues with the front sprocket without the rubber bushing, I've been using aftermarket sprockets for years. I've not noticed an increase in noise, but I wear earplugs every time I ride. :) Performance will be the same. Just make sure you install in correctly. Unlike the stock rubber grommet ones, the aftermarket ones may have a raised "shoulder" around the middle on one side. That usually faces out, away from the bike. At least that's been my experience on my other bikes. Something to check and verify, as I'm not positive about the Versys. (I just got mine!). What's the stock chain/sprocket size on a Versys? Is it 520 pitch? If so, maybe there won't be a "shoulder" on the front sprocket. On my gsxr there is, but the stock chain is 525 and I changed to to 520. Perhaps the shoulder is to make up for using a narrower chain and sprocket.

As mentioned, the torque specs for install will be the same as the stock sprockets.

Changing gearing doesn't increase torque or horsepower. It changes how quickly the rpms increase, basically, which can result in increased acceleration.
On my track bike, I'll typically shorten the gearing by going down one tooth in the front and/or up 1-2 teeth in the rear. This results in the rpms being higher in any given gear. The result is quicker acceleration off the corners. It comes at the expense of top speed, as you'll reach redline quicker. On a streetbike, this change can make it seem buzzy on the highway, as the rpms are higher at any given speed than they would be with the stock gearing.

Conversely, making the gearing taller by adding a tooth to the front or decreasing teeth in the rear will drop the rpms in any given gear. The bike will feel less "peppy" on acceleration, but for a street bike, it'll be less buzzy on the highway, as the rpms won't go as high.

A lot of it is personal preference. For example, most folks like -1 front, +2 rear on the gsxr for the track. I don't, I prefer -1 front 0 rear. The +2 changed my shift points, I had to shift sooner, and in places on the track not convenient for me.

Hope some of this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Quick question....
The OEM rear sprocket looks the same on both sides. My new rear sprocket is indented on one side....Would the indented side go inside(facing the tire) or outside?

OEM sprocket is like this on both sides:


New sprocket has this indention on one side:
 

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From a logic stand point I don't see how it could matter which way it is facing in regards to the chain riding on the teeth.

But there could be something completely illogical involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yeah, I called the guys over at sprocketcenter.com, and they confirmed that the indention should face the outside. Thanks.

invader: what makes it so "obvious"? I couldn't think of anything myself honestly....
 
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