Kawasaki Versys Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

Registered
09 v650, 00'r1150gs, 83' r80rt
Joined
219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It happens Out There.

Format:

Share the "Out There"..........(insert Cool story)

Disasters, Best Moments, Worst Rides, Natural, Un-natural, Paranormal, Abnormal, Expected, Un Sane, Non Linear? ETC....




Thanks For Playing, This I hope will show us some good stuff, Cheers!馃榿
 

Registered
09 v650, 00'r1150gs, 83' r80rt
Joined
219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Here I will show the reasons Why I dont use shinko tires.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Bicycle tire Automotive tire

Tire Automotive tire Wheel Motor vehicle Tread

Tire Wheel Tread Automotive tire Synthetic rubber

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber

They say Pictures speak many words, However.
I was riding along, Happy as can be.
Felt a little bit of a squirrelyness (technical terminologies) from the backend, then everything got really hard to move.
I let go of the handlebars, and the bike righted itself, and pulled itself off the road onto the shoulder.
 

Registered
Joined
496 Posts
My buddies and I planned a trip around Utah for May 2020. COVID hit about two weeks after we planned everything out. Utah had moderate closures, but national parks (we planned to visit several) were shut down.

As luck would have it, the Parks opened up just a few days before our trip was scheduled to start, so we headed out. Day 1 was Denver to Moab. I didn't want to take the highway all the way there, so I planned the route to include the section from Gateway, CO into Moab (The Gateway-Castleton Valley OHV road). About 25 miles of the 58 mile route is dirt. Nothing a V1K can't handle, right?

The ride was fine until I got to a section that was completely silt-covered with ruts underneath. bike got squirrelly, I grabbed the wrong brake, and the bike went down at about 20MPH. Ended up with a sore left ankle and knee, but we had plenty of straps and seat space to secure my topcase and leftside pannier for the remaining 5 days of the trip...

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle


There is literally no damage to the left side pannier. I'm pretty sure that's because my left leg was dragging underneath it as I went down.馃槱

The only other significant damage besides a broken passenger grab rail and the topbox mounting plate, was the left footpeg holder cracked. It held up the rest of the trip with a little bit of baling wire.o_O
Wheel Tire Automotive tire Vehicle brake Locking hubs


Ironically, my buddy dropped his Multistrada while we were getting my bike gathered, and he damaged his left handguard. That handguard cost almost as much as all three of my parts
 

Registered
09 v650, 00'r1150gs, 83' r80rt
Joined
219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My buddies and I planned a trip around Utah for May 2020. COVID hit about two weeks after we planned everything out. Utah had moderate closures, but national parks (we planned to visit several) were shut down.

As luck would have it, the Parks opened up just a few days before our trip was scheduled to start, so we headed out. Day 1 was Denver to Moab. I didn't want to take the highway all the way there, so I planned the route to include the section from Gateway, CO into Moab (The Gateway-Castleton Valley OHV road). About 25 miles of the 58 mile route is dirt. Nothing a V1K can't handle, right?

The ride was fine until I got to a section that was completely silt-covered with ruts underneath. bike got squirrelly, I grabbed the wrong brake, and the bike went down at about 20MPH. Ended up with a sore left ankle and knee, but we had plenty of straps and seat space to secure my topcase and leftside pannier for the remaining 5 days of the trip...

View attachment 187665

There is literally no damage to the left side pannier. I'm pretty sure that's because my left leg was dragging underneath it as I went down.馃槱

The only other significant damage besides a broken passenger grab rail and the topbox mounting plate, was the left footpeg holder cracked. It held up the rest of the trip with a little bit of baling wire.o_O
View attachment 187666

Ironically, my buddy dropped his Multistrada while we were getting my bike gathered, and he damaged his left handguard. That handguard cost almost as much as all three of my parts
tHATS wHAT Happens, anyways. Sounds and looks exactly like what I was talking about things happening out there.
glad you made it back, Your alive right?
 

Registered
Joined
2,465 Posts
try this one, from the archives...

I was well into this section, nobody out this far that I could see, when I rode up on a temporary hunter basecamp, the men back in camp for a late lunch. I could see why they hadn't bothered to set camp farther out, there was a mud bog in the road past their camp. If I had been thinking a little clearer, I would have recognized it for what it was, a billboard size warning sign that said "Stop, ya dumbass, turn around, go home". I didn't see that sign, or if I did, I must have thought it was for the OP, not me. Mistake, huge mistake.

[IMG]

I wasn't over half a mile past the mud when I realized that I had a problem, big or little, serious or not, I just plain didn't know. The road through here had been described as sandy, but that wasn't quite accurate, there were rocky cut up sections too. Areas where the road was sheltered in any way consisted of deep sand, and where it was more exposed so the wind could get at it, rocky. I'd stopped for a drink, heat searing, and checked my watch, damn, I was advancing at only 1mph average, working damn hard through soft sand, and winding little used double track in places. I took a look at the Butler map, the ride-around alternate route was well behind me, I was trying to get all the way up to I10, and down to 3 liters of water left for the effort. Advance or retreat, and I played with some time factors, let's advance, maybe it will get better. It didn't.

[IMG]

I had been in the sand for 2 miles, now through half my water, and was speculating on whether the reported 4 miles of sand was true, or not. I thought no one else was out here, but passed a 4x4 pickup parked well off the road, there must be some other passable road in here, tire tracks were intermittent or none. Most likely a hunter, and if I had seen anyone at the truck, I would have tried to bum some water, no luck, no one around. I knew all the signs of dehydration very well, and it was gaining on me. I could have downed my last two liters in one pull at that point, but I conserved, I10 beyond reach at the moment.

[IMG]

[IMG]

By the time it looked like the sand had begun to peter out, I had been fighting it almost four hours, and I got off the bike, sat down. I was dehydrated and beat, but had brought the bike through without flopping it, no mean feat, the only upside that came to mind. I wasn't out of it yet, still more riding to locate a maintained road, and after one more ranch gate, I was out, the Empire Ranch Road done. If ever asked, I would confirm it, ain't big bike friendly in there, know what you're about to bite into.

[IMG]

Jogged the bike across a couple of graded mine roads, and found the start of the Hilton Ranch Road, the last section before I10, better take stock. I was dehydrated and very tired, but it wasn't all that far to the end, and reports said rocks, no mention of sand. I walked in a few feet to scout, it didn't look like much of a road, worse, no tire tracks. The road looked washed out, no vehicles had been in here for quite awhile, the rutted surface was all from runoff, not use. I rode in there anyway, mistake two.

The road was in terrible shape, worse than I thought, difficult, but still manageable if I had been fresher instead of dogged. On a heavily rutted ascent, I was forced to change lines right-to-left, came over the top, dropped into the deep left rut, found that blocked too, couldn't get back right, tried to climb out left, and put the bike smack on the ground out in the cactus.

[IMG]

Ain't no use looking around for someone to help ya pick it up, it was going to be a struggle, better get to it, and I pulled the duffle off the back, should be easier. I took a quick photo, stowed the camera, found a handhold on the bike, and got it back up in one mighty heave. If I hadn't gotten right after it, I might not have stood it up at all, I was exhausted. The bike safely on the side stand, I strapped everything down, then back on the bike. Sitting there for a minute, I looked west, the sun was very low, not down, but low, less than one liter of water left, and I wasn't feelin' too good.

I was back on the road, picking my lines through rocks and ruts, the emphasis was on keeping a very modest pace, and the bike upright. In another two miles, I approached a left hand corner on a rocky uphill, standing on the pegs looking at the possible lines ahead, I added some throttle into the turn to build momentum on the climb, and the bike rolled out from under me on loose rock. I was on the ground in a blink, landing hard on my left side. I was stunned, lost a little wind when I hit the ground, then pissed, I would have to pick it up again, unbelievable. I shut the key off, the motor had shut down on the tilt sensor, then did a walk around, couldn't see any fluid leaks, the bike had gone down with a crunch on the rocks. The bike was lying uphill, an advantage if slight, and I managed to get it back up, but barely. I nearly lost it again just trying to get the side stand down, and when I looked around again, it was twilight, the sun was down.

I decided that I had one last chance to get north to I10, but it would only work if the road didn't get worse and I stayed on two wheels. I would not be able to pick the bike up again, I felt weak as a freakin' cat. I had all the lights burning now, mains and auxiliaries, and I still couldn't see the road that well. It wasn't lack of lights, it was my vision that had gone blurry. Over a hill, then descending, and I ran out into a wide wash with 10" deep sand in the bottom, bike down on the right in a spray of sand, my right leg trapped under the pannier up past the knee, it wouldn't budge, the boot was hooked below the pannier bottom, compressed into the sand. I would have to dig my leg out, no option, and after pulling away sand by hand, I wiggled around enough to pull my boot out towards the back of the bike.

I stood there for a minute or two looking at the bike, and I knew what I was in for trying to get it back up in sand like this, but I also knew it couldn't stay here. I drank a little water, looked at the bottle, maybe a pint left. A bottle of sports drink that I had forgotten about had been crushed when the bike went down, serious bad luck there. After three tries, the bike was up, I couldn't move and stood there for awhile balancing the bike, couldn't put the side stand down in the sand. Got the motor started and clutched it over to the north side of the wash to hard ground, then walked back for the gear. I needed a place to set the tent in the next quarter mile, that's all I had left, no choice but to spend the night out here.

I found a little spot that was big enough and less rocky, set the tent by headlight, and climbed in. I drank a mouthful of water, my reserve was only one cup now. I was lying on my back as still and loose as possible in the tent, the slightest movement would cause painful cramps, unsure whether I could get any sleep like this.

There was no breeze, and the desert was very still. I was in extremely rough shape, no doubt, and lying there I could hear just the faintest of sounds every so often, so faint it was almost imaginary, and after eliminating some possible sources, I decided it must be from a truck climbing a grade on I10, I had come that close to salvation.

I was up and out of the tent as soon as I detected light through the tent wall, darkness done. I was standing in the desert wearing just skivvies, bathing in the cool air, a weary, aching body from dehydration and cramping. The sun was just coming up, sea or desert, ain't nothing like a sunrise. It was a new day, and I wasn't one to drain the future by fixing on what was in the rear view mirrors. I'd done a self assessment and couldn't find any injury from bouncing around on the ground the day before, but later would find a bruise on my hip that looked like a major leaguer had whacked me with a ball bat. The bike looked fine in daylight, some paint missing, scrapes and scratches, controls out of position, but nothing bent or broken. The bike had been designed to survive, the design had to function, and unfortunately, there's no substitute for a field test, or three.

[IMG]

I packed up the camp quickly, took a sip of water from the tiny reserve, and took off north, destination I10, fluids and food. I hadn't ridden far past my camp, man, glad I quit in the dark, more rough road and I would never have made it. The GPS was showing three miles to the slab, and with only a mile to go I passed a hunter standing at his truck, he must have just driven in. The north entrance to Hilton Ranch is gated, and I stopped at the grade to walk down and open it, never thought I would actually be happy to see the slab, something usually avoided.

[IMG]
 

Super Moderator
Joined
21,363 Posts
Several days later on the SAME ride (w/ Mr jdrocks) - Dave 'doing' the AZBDR while I was just showing him some of Arizona, we rode up this bit of crap

PA270873 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

which on the 'hill' above that pic had a VERY BIG drop-off to the left, then we stopped at the top, a few miles S of Globe

PA270874 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA270875 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

then gassed up there, and continued N on AZ 188 to the road to Young, AZ 288, where I KNEW the road WAS passable w/ a 'reasonable' place to camp as it was working on getting dark.

PA270880 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA270883 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA270885 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA280888 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

Next morning we rode N on various 'unprepared' road surfaces after passing Young

PA280897 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

then we decided to setup camp at Long Lake E of Happy Jack.

PA280905 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr
 

Super Moderator
Joined
21,363 Posts
We were serenaded by bugling elk after eating

PA280912 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA290916 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

then broke camp in the 'AYEM' after Dave helped me find my keys....

PA290917 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

Since Young we'd been riding the AZBDR, and NOW there were rocks sticking up almost to footpeg height, so I was getting quite nervous about 'going down' w/ serious bike or ME injuries. [I had already broken both legs racing enduros in different decades - '75 and '91 - and did NOT want to do THAT again!]

PA290918 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

There was NO WAY I was going to stop in the area w/ the WORST rocks for a pic, but once they got smaller I got this pic.


PA290920 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

I was ready to do a "180" and get the heck outta THERE, as Dave pulled up, and agreed to shut it down w/ me too. [I know he continued past Flagstaff on the AZBDR while I headed home, my 'tail-between-my-legs'.]

PA290922 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA290925 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr
 

Registered
2021 Versys-X 300 2021 Z900RS
Joined
239 Posts
We were serenaded by bugling elk after eating

PA280912 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA290916 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

then broke camp in the 'AYEM' after Dave helped me find my keys....

PA290917 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

Since Young we'd been riding the AZBDR, and NOW there were rocks sticking up almost to footpeg height, so I was getting quite nervous about 'going down' w/ serious bike or ME injuries. [I had already broken both legs racing enduros in different decades - '75 and '91 - and did NOT want to do THAT again!]

PA290918 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

There was NO WAY I was going to stop in the area w/ the WORST rocks for a pic, but once they got smaller I got this pic.


PA290920 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

I was ready to do a "180" and get the heck outta THERE, as Dave pulled up, and agreed to shut it down w/ me too. [I know he continued past Flagstaff on the AZBDR while I headed home, my 'tail-between-my-legs'.]

PA290922 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr

PA290925 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr
Have you ridden the Mogollon Rim Road? Paved/Unpaved? I've been on the Rim Road once as a kid. I was a passenger in a pick up truck. I want to go ride it.
 

Registered
Joined
2,465 Posts
Have you ridden the Mogollon Rim Road? Paved/Unpaved? I've been on the Rim Road once as a kid. I was a passenger in a pick up truck. I want to go ride it.
Rim road, or that collection of roads is on the AZBDR. get a map, it;s a maze in there. have an evac plan, the Muggyon and surrounding area burns. the Rim roads are gravel except up to the park entrance area.
 

Registered
Joined
2,465 Posts
then we decided to setup camp at Long Lake E of Happy Jack.

PA280905 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr
Long Lake, since dried up, is where you decided to secure your bike against thievery even though we were in BFE, miles from anything called civilization. just had to install that disc lock, then lost the freakin' key.

2 hours of searching later, and exactly 60 seconds from the start of me dismantling the damn bike, he finds the key...in his pocket. ya can't make this stuff up folks, think about it, this guy used to fly airplanes.
 

Registered
Joined
2,465 Posts
on a roll now, here's Sunset Crater...

I was camped near a small pull out on a gravel road running roughly parallel to 89, but lower in elevation at my location, and the tent was set only slightly back in the tree line with the bike parked behind the tent, as secure as I thought I could make it. Noise from the cars and trucks on 89 could be plainly heard, not the best gypsy campsite I had ever used, but far from the worst. I had only seen one vehicle on the road in front of me since I'd been there, a small car drifting on the gravel, coffee can exhaust, traveling way too fast and dragging plenty of dust.

Sleep was fitful, noise spilling down from 89 made it sound like some traffic on the gravel even though I knew it couldn't be, that and some old man aches, but traffic volume was decreasing as the hours went by, then to almost nothing after midnight. Some small noise woke me with a start at 1AM, and I mean asleep to 100% awake in an instant, and a womans voice said "There's someone here already", clear as a bell, and very close to the tent, like close enough to reach out and touch it. The walls of my MSR tent are translucent, no lights of any kind were showing, there was no more conversation, and no vehicle noises or headlights. I had my little pocket knife, wishing on some damn firepower, heck, I would have felt a lot better if I had a freakin' stick, anything. I was laying there as still as could be, listening intently for any sound, at least I wasn't actually in my sleeping bag, it was open over the top of me. With no more sounds, it crossed my mind that I had imagined that voice, no way, I've never been one prone to that sort of thing, there had been someone standing right next to my tent out here at 1 freakin' AM, presumably more than a single someone.

I knew when the clock struck 5AM, I'd been looking at my watch every 30 minutes, that conked out restful sleep had never happened, and I was up and out. It was full dark at this hour, but I saw no vehicles or anything else around me, and nothing had been disturbed on the bike. I was getting some breakfast underway and still thinking about that voice when I saw headlights on the road slowly coming towards me, out about half a mile, and as quickly as I had noticed them, they were shut off, not the vehicle, just the headlights, I could still hear the vehicle moving, WTF is going on around here. I shut my headlamp off and stepped back into the trees, who drives on these gravel roads without headlights, and a late model GM pickup idled past, didn't slow further or stop. I don't get it, but one thing sure, when the sun is up, I'm gone, got the Sunset Crater T-shirt, one I'll never forget.

With the sun up, I packed up the camp, ready to skedaddle north on 89 a short distance to pick up the AZBDR gravel again.

[IMG]
 

Registered
Joined
5,678 Posts
I was only going about 80 to 90mph
No worries. 馃槄
I've had zero issues with shinkos on any of my bikes. I have had issues with Metzler and Michelin tires.

Of course an under inflated overloaded tire could experience that kind of failure. Not the tires fault until a whole batch have the same defect like the issues I had.
 

Registered
09 v650, 00'r1150gs, 83' r80rt
Joined
219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I've had zero issues with shinkos on any of my bikes. I have had issues with Metzler and Michelin tires.

Of course an under inflated overloaded tire could experience that kind of failure. Not the tires fault until a whole batch have the same defect like the issues I had.
Tire was properly inflated at approx 38psi (which is standard for my 1150gs). I know because I checked it before my ride south to friends. Front tire was at 35psi. The tread was worn down a bit but not unreliable. I've had tires with allot more wear before I'd replaced them. The tire saw maybe one summer of riding plus or minus a few weeks. I put allot of miles on my bike during warm months

Only thing on the bike was me and panniers. Panniers had usual tool kit and a rain jacket. May e a bottle of water or 2. This was on a 50-60f degree day. I did send my compliments of the tires ability to fail to the company. They offered varied ideas etc. But no unilateral sorries. Oh well. I lived. Rim made it out safe as me.
And I got a terrific wreath out of it!

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Lifebuoy Tread

Thanks for looking.
We all down here thought long and hard about the failure. Lots of "experts" have weighed in on the subject. I've had the tread and other things inspected by less then dubious personages. They all were just as baffled. Yay.
I lived. Otherwise you guys wouldnt be able to read this post. It was 2 years ago now it happened.


Cheers!
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top