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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now it's my chance to repay with a ride of my own - not a big ride, but a ride none the less. This happened about 6 weeks ago - over the last weekend of January.



Finally, finally, I got some of my $h!te together and made a 4 day weekend for riding. Finally!!!

My beloved was off with her sister packing up their parents' house, and my presence wasn't required. So it was just a couple of runs to the airport for me and 4 whole glorious days to ride. Do you ever stress over "what is the BEST ride?" I sure can! There are so many roads & towns & pubs & lookouts etc., and I can't do them all... Anyway, riding any road is better than not riding!

I had spent ages looking at maps for accommodation, fuel, fuel, accommodation, and so on. But I didn't know much of what was out there, so I didn't know how long any section would really take. All I knew was I had 4 days and a wallet with some money. So I just went. I went north on the A3.

But first


clean & tidy the kitchen

do two loads of washing - you don't need photo's


mow the lawn


and give the dogs a bone


And I'm off like... [insert simile here]


Off. On my first real trip on the V

It was awesome to be finally on the road with no other goal than to just be on the road. But it did take most of the afternoon to really get it!

For me, the best place to join the A3 is at Hampton. And the best part of this is that Hampton is at the top of a small, tight mountain range. Gotta love a good ride up the range to Hampton!


this must be the right road!


new green growth after last years fires

This road is a bit of a challenge, as it has a constantly changing surface - from smooth to looks smooth but isn't and to patched & corrugated; in & out of shadows; forest, clearings, lookouts & farmland; bikes, cars, caravans & trucks all in a hurry; plus so much to look at.

I had been this way on the V a couple of times and many many times on the KLR. It never fails to excite. In many ways. I "accidentally" dragged my toe once while on the KLR - that was a heart starter, and the V bucked me out of the seat once - that was more than a heart starter; I've ruined my braking & cornering by staring into the lush green forest or off to the distant ranges near home, and I've absolutely nailed some, just some, of the corners.


see what I mean


more please


the trees are still black from last summers' fires, but the recent rain has done them wonders


stay on the black-top today, but nothing lost

And onwards I go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And now, dear reader, your intrepid author, turns right.

North on the A3 (at this point it is called the New England Highway) towards Cooyar where I stop for food & drink.


turn right

then


go straight

Rolling farmlands & sweeping bends take me to Cooyar where I stop for food & drink.


stopped at Cooyar

Behind me is McCoy's Cafe - it's worth a stop to look at the bike bits which the owner displays, as he has quite some collection - the owner is Gary McCoy, ex GP & Superbike racer. Plus the food is fantastic. I bought a cold drink and ate my "travel food". And looked forward to the ride out of town.


the road out of town


does it get any better?

And the afternoon rolled on...


more

Across more rolling hills, around gentle bends, through green pastures & forests to the end of the "New England Highway" at Yarraman.


the pub used to face the other road behind, but when the main road was re-routed the pub was picked up, turned around, and moved to the new highway frontage
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The A3 continues north as the D'Aguilar Highway and the highest point is just out of town at a mighty 527 metres above sea level. The highway is named after the town which is named after the mountain range which was named by Major Edmund Lockyer in 1825 after Sir George D'Aguilar, with whom he had served in Sicily, Spain and India and who wrote Regulations and Punishments of the British Army, the army textbook in use at the time (from Wikipedia - of course, and Queensland Places).


near the top - rich red volcanic soil


and after the forest is cleared you can see far far away

There was a bit of traffic on the A3


big rig & medium-sized caravan


the 650 is quite good at overtaking

I did eventually need to stop for fuel. That fuel gauge is quite pessimistic - I had one bar showing and only put in 13.5 litres (this was a recurring theme for the trip).


the hurdle


the A3 becomes the Burnett Highway

By now the wind buffeting was really getting to me - the Shoei Hornet may have spent a long time in the wind tunnel, but there was a lot of wasted time! The new screen wasn't quite tall enough to push the air over the peak so the peak would vibrate. And make the helmet vibrate. With the OEM screen at it's lowest, the buffeting & vibration was worse.
By firmly holding the peak between two fingers I could greatly reduce the vibration.


checking the height of the turbulence


standing to get out of the buffeting

And so the road and the afternoon continued. It was just an awesome afternoon of riding through the country. Nothing left for me to say.


a quick break at Ban Ban Springs

In the 2016 census, Ban Ban Springs had a population of 7 people - thanks Wikipedia.

And so I got to Gayndah for a photo with the Big Orange


taking the photo


the photo

and wondered about finding somewhere to stay. Google maps showed a couple of pubs, a caravan park and a few motels. Riding around town showed the same. My criteria were 1. close to town so I could walk to dinner & 2. off-street parking. But I saw 2 motels with pools. So the criteria quickly changed and I went to the motel with the pool that was closest to town. Easy decision after all. Very clever too, as a soak in the pool was very welcome.

I had seen a sign for a lookout in town, so off I went.


narrow road with a dozen wallabies trying to relax after a big of wallabying


looking back down the hill


looking north(ish) over Gayndah


a summer sunset from Archer's Lookout

And there ends day 1. All that remains is dinner at the pub.


map of the day





Well, at least the beer was cold. The motel manager recommended the pub on the left because they did a great steak and the building still had it's original pressed sheet metal ceiling. I like my steak medium. I used to like it rare, but now I like it medium, or maybe a bit to the rare side. So I ordered medium, as usually, steaks are undercooked. While sitting in the dining room and enjoying a cold beer, admiring the pressed metal ceiling and watching the world come & go I heard a local tell his friends that the cook overcooks the steak about 3 grades. Surely not!
The server was very apologetic that my meal took so long, as it was a big night. Actually, the reason the steak took so long was that it, and I presume all, were left on the grill way too long. I don't mind a bit of charing on the outside... but. And it wasn't even that nice of a piece of meat. I should have sent it back but the staff had disappeared. I've done much better myself with supermarket steak.
But the chips were crunchy & the beer was cold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Day 2. It's a Saturday, but every day is a Saturday.

And a walk through town is a great way to start the day - a good look at the sights and a bit of much-needed exercise.

The first stop was out the front of a retirement home - this is the plaque in the footpath


so not much has changed then

Gayndah has been a rich farming area since the mid-1800's - not old by most standards, but it's pretty good for around here. Most towns have a collection of old machinery, household items & buildings.


back when I were a lad...


so much ingenuity


a homestead from the 1870's that's been moved into town & restored

The bakery was closed - new operators starting on Monday - so "travel food" for breakfast. I'll make up for it tonight!


scene of last nights' steak murder


do you remember these? it now has a big Scaletrix racing circuit


no fuel today

Now to find the other, bigger lookout. Up the highway to the turn-off on the left, you can't miss it.


turn off to McConnell Lookout - I didn't miss it


sounds good to me


it's a busy road so can't be too bad


I'd rather ride this than wet bitumen

I just love a ride in the country, I'm not real fussy where, but this is great!


stopped for a photo


the photo of the hill


another serene bush scene ruined by an ugly orange bike

The V650 was fine on the lightly gravelled road, I was expecting a bit of squirming around and was ready to be very worried, but it was fine. It just went where I pointed it at around 50+ km/h.


and up we go

There's a well set up picnic spot at the top, but camping is expensive at $5,500 a night (if you're caught).




plaque, things need a plaque or they don't exist, government members need their name on a plaque or they don't exist

It was worth the climb with a view over the Burnett River, farmland with citrus orchards, and off to the east is Wongi National Park & State Forest.


a short walk from the carpark is the view
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
79 kilometres north along the A3 later I'm at the RM Williams Australian Bush Learning Centre, located in, the "self-proclaimed Beef Capital of the North Burnett", town of Eidsvold, which is were RM Williams chose to settle after leaving South Australia in the 1950s. It has a covered picnic table for me to eat "travel food" at and toilets. Plus, it's real claim to fame is a bit of history, the story of the bushman & founder of the RM Williams company, RM Williams. He made his fame doing leatherwork - saddles, boots, belts, whips etc. for the bushmen of the Australian outback. You can read more here, and I suggest you do Our History.


the RM Williams Australian Bush Learning Centre & Visitor Information Centre and an ugly orange Kawasaki

RM was famous for his leatherwork. I had a go at plaiting leather, but I won't be famous.


not a career move

I found this in the open paddock behind the picnic table - at first, it looks like it is just a lone pine tree, but it is so much more.








Back to the road my friends... but as I was getting close to Monto, this happened.


liquid sunshine

but I know how to stop this


and magically the rain never quite came


still a great day

Do you have painted grain silos?

paintings of the "three moons" legend

and then I rolled on into Monto for fuel. 16.5 litres for 325km. And, if I remember correctly, the last bar of the fuel gauge was flashing.


looking at the Toyota, I'm happy to stay on the bitumen

Monto must be a magnet for rain, as that was it.

On the outskirts of town, there were more reminders of how we all got here, I'd love to stop, but I have a plan.


hardship, desperation, necessity, progress

Kilometre after kilometre, minute after minute, tune after tune, paddock after creek after forest after homestead, town after village after locality, the afternoon rolled blissfully on.

The rain cleared and the heat came - probably got to 35C (95F), hot but not uncomfortably hot (I'd like to think my sensible white helmet & light coloured jacket helps).


trees clinging to the road reserve

The heat was a good excuse to stop for a look around.


another stunning landscape photo ruined by that orange bike


it's actually quite a rich landscape


red bit on a catus


yellow flower on a woody shrub
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, for the next couple of hours, I just rode. I rode north on the A3 - Thangool, Biloela, Orange Creek, Dixalea, Dululu (turn right) and on to Mt Morgan and down the range to Bauldercombe.

But the pub was shut, although there was still free camping next door, and a lovely park over the road.



I mentioned that I had a plan, well it wasn't so much a plan as an idea. Get to the coast and eat fish and chips by the beach. Not a grand idea, but certainly, in my opinion, a worthy one. I had previously looked at accommodation options and fish & chip options and it looked good. Google maps even still showed motel rooms available. While sitting in the park eating some, surprisingly still satisfactory, travel food I put my clever pants on and rang the motel. Pro-tip: don't trust Google.

Would you believe that I wasn't the only one to want to stay by the beach and eat fish & chips? Turns out I wasn't, but what I was, was too late. Way too late as the next 7+ motels were also booked out, or just had a stupidly expensive family room. And then my phone rang - my wife's brother just wanted a yarn (could have done with a beer tho'). So the search continued for a reasonably priced motel with a pool. It was a hot day and a pool actually sounded better than a beer. Found one! Eventually. Not by the beach, not even near the beach, or a fish & chip shop, but it had a pool and the staff were friendly on the phone.

And back to the road.

Pass under the railway line, it is raised above the flood plain.


the bridge

Then the end of the A3, sorry but my phone camera was playing up so only an image from Google.


the end of this bit

Now to the motel pool in Rockhampton.


turn left for the pool

When it rains, it really rains, so the highway gets a big bridge over the floodplains


floodplains, so named as it's a plain that will flood

This is THE beef capital, and just to prove it they have big bulls (well, usually they are bulls, but sometimes they become steers).


just one of several big bulls

I was using the TomTom app on my phone for navigation and it... well, it makes strange decisions about the best route, and this time I'm off the main road into town and taking some back roads. But, looking back, it was more interesting than the main highway. Here's a little of what I saw.


Did your dad ever make the joke about the cemetery being in the very middle of town, the "dead centre"? Mine did. Often. I have as well, but I'd like to think I used it sparingly and only on special occasions.


the middle of town


Here's a couple of old houses, built cheaply from timber & sheets of corrugated iron, large verandahs to keep out the heat and above ground to catch more of the breeze plus keep away from the termites.


renovators delight


now that's livin'

And off to the motel with a pool.


motel with pool

Today's map.


day 2

Now for a walk and dinner.


I might have eaten a little bit much
 

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So, for the next couple of hours, I just rode. I rode north on the A3 - Thangool, Biloela, Orange Creek, Dixalea, Dululu (turn right) and on to Mt Morgan and down the range to Bauldercombe.

But the pub was shut, although there was still free camping next door, and a lovely park over the road.



I mentioned that I had a plan, well it wasn't so much a plan as an idea. Get to the coast and eat fish and chips by the beach. Not a grand idea, but certainly, in my opinion, a worthy one. I had previously looked at accommodation options and fish & chip options and it looked good. Google maps even still showed motel rooms available. While sitting in the park eating some, surprisingly still satisfactory, travel food I put my clever pants on and rang the motel. Pro-tip: don't trust Google.

Would you believe that I wasn't the only one to want to stay by the beach and eat fish & chips? Turns out I wasn't, but what I was, was too late. Way too late as the next 7+ motels were also booked out, or just had a stupidly expensive family room. And then my phone rang - my wife's brother just wanted a yarn (could have done with a beer tho'). So the search continued for a reasonably priced motel with a pool. It was a hot day and a pool actually sounded better than a beer. Found one! Eventually. Not by the beach, not even near the beach, or a fish & chip shop, but it had a pool and the staff were friendly on the phone.

And back to the road.

Pass under the railway line, it is raised above the flood plain.


the bridge

Then the end of the A3, sorry but my phone camera was playing up so only an image from Google.


the end of this bit

Now to the motel pool in Rockhampton.


turn left for the pool

When it rains, it really rains, so the highway gets a big bridge over the floodplains


floodplains, so named as it's a plain that will flood

This is THE beef capital, and just to prove it they have big bulls (well, usually they are bulls, but sometimes they become steers).


just one of several big bulls

I was using the TomTom app on my phone for navigation and it... well, it makes strange decisions about the best route, and this time I'm off the main road into town and taking some back roads. But, looking back, it was more interesting than the main highway. Here's a little of what I saw.


Did your dad ever make the joke about the cemetery being in the very middle of town, the "dead centre"? Mine did. Often. I have as well, but I'd like to think I used it sparingly and only on special occasions.


the middle of town


Here's a couple of old houses, built cheaply from timber & sheets of corrugated iron, large verandahs to keep out the heat and above ground to catch more of the breeze plus keep away from the termites.


renovators delight


now that's livin'

And off to the motel with a pool.


motel with pool

Today's map.


day 2

Now for a walk and dinner.


I might have eaten a little bit much
Nice ride, man!

As far as I can see you did only two things wrong . Clean the kitchen and cut the grass....you lost 45 minute of precious riding time. 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Day 3. Sunday, but every day is a Sunday when you're on holidays.

I had 3 things to do. All holiday things!

1. Go to the mountain as there's a lookout. Easy.

TomTom doesn't know where either the mountain or lookout are. My other phone, the one that really is a phone, and the Cardo don't want to play together, so I can't use Google Maps. TomTom does think it knows where the National Park that contains the mountain and lookout are. And there are always lots of signs. How hard can it be then? Well, hard! TomTom trys to take me the back-way into the N'Park, and by back-way I mean straight into the scrub at the end of a road that was never built. Twice. So I kept riding & looking for signs (don't we all?). TomTom didn't like this. TomTom kept saying "turn around", "turn left & turn around" or, wait for it... "turn right then turn around", and there didn't even need to be a side road to turn into. As I got further away from what it thought was the N'Park it seemed to get more & more desperate. I was thinking about getting desperate as there were no signs either. So I kept riding. And ignoring TomTom.

Of to site number 2. A beach. Well, not just any beach. This beach. And I'd not been here before.


the view to the beach

Back in the day, from the mid-'60s to probably the early-'80s, my wife's family owned a shack here and this was their beach. Weekends and school holidays were spent at the beach. All 100m of it, but it was all theirs. Now that is something to be a bit envious about.


THE beach

As I wasn't dressed for swimming, it was now time to find that lookout! I'll just use google maps with no audio, like I should have the first time. And as it was still morning, the sun was mostly behind me so out of my eyes and shining onto the phone screen.

I found it. TomTom had no idea, no #insert many swearwords here# idea.

And who doesn't like a ride up a (small) mountain, even at the speed limit.


road to Fraser Park Lookout, Mt Archer


view & twisty road with new Armco

Fraser Park Lookout was worth the effort. Beautiful gardens & well-preserved native landscapes. Big views. A few info signs to feed the curiosity. Hiking trails. Go there!


thankyou


viewing westish over northish Rockhampton

After another, strangely still satisfying, feed of travel food, it was time to head towards #3. But first...

more riding,

182058

back down the mountain

then fuel, chocky milk and sites 2b & 2c. Plus a bonus on the way.


bonus bull


the original southside bull - on the road into Rockhampton from the south

See, I told you Rockhampton is THE beef capital. Bulls with reinforced scrotums, that says everything that needs to be said!

That's it, over there, between the palm trees, in front of the tourist information centre. Another interesting thing, and this time a science thing. It was moved here in 1980 after the highway was moved.


tall pointy thing erected, probably, in the 60's


taking the obligatory photo


the obligatory photo, with bonus fingers

The spire marks the Tropic of Capricorn, the sun's, apparent, most southerly point, usually occurring on December 21. In the north, this is the sun's, apparent, furthest point away and marks the beginning of the return of the sun, warmth, growth & life - hence the traditional mid-winter festival of Christmas. But down here, we should have Christmas in June.


on 21 December the sun is directly overhead

From Wikipedia, because I know that you wanted to know - Its latitude is currently 23°26′11.6″ south of the Equator, but it is very gradually moving northward, currently at the rate of 0.47 arcseconds, or 15 metres, per year.
So it's in the wrong place.
But wait! There's more - it was at exactly 23° 27′S in 1917 and will be at 23° 26'S in 2045), and for the first 10 readers, you can learn - there are approximately 13 hours, 35 minutes of daylight during the summer solstice...

And there endeth today's lesson...

And now off to number three, a bit of history...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Heading south on the A1, the main highway around the country.


coal on it's way to the export port, or the coal fired power station, but that doesn't rhime

That's enough science, let's have some history.

This is not a pleasant ride. It's hot. There's lots of traffic. There are limited overtaking opportunities. There are roadworks to stop at. Did I say it was hot? After only about 45 minutes I took a break in the sun opposite the Raglan Tavern. Tavern? tempting, but there where actually things to do this afternoon.

But, fear not, this is actually a (short) road to somewhere.


Years ago, many years ago, more years than I realized, I used to live down this way. So, this is a little trip down Memory Lane.

The railway line. See the pylons holding up the wires - I marked out their position. Back in about '86, I walked this line with an engineering plan, a bag of wooden pegs, a tape measure & a marker pen marking the position of the pylons. Then I would go back and change them because the engineers had either given me the wrong plan or changed their minds. After the hole was drilled, the formwork was in place and the bolts/reinforcing rods hung, I would go back & check that it was the correct one in the correct place. Exciting, not, but it paid very well.


I did (some of) that

Turn left at Mt Larcom onto the Gladstone Mt Larcom Road. Wanna guess where I'm going? Yep, Gladstone. A port & industrial city that I moved to, in '77, with my family - I was in my first year of high school.

I had thought I would make a video of my tour - to show my family, not you. It was quite interesting, in a personal way. But I didn't actually turn the camera on. Damn!. But, fortunately, I found this out before leaving so I could do some of it again. But this time I didn't plug the microphone in properly. Destiny! Anyway, here are a few stills from the video.


the old port

Down there, in the garden, used to be where we would abseil down the cliff, back when you could just turn up and do it. We had proper ropes tied to proper rocks - or was it trees? lengths of seat-belt webbing to tie into a harness, a couple of carabiners to hold it all together and some gardening gloves to run the rope through. It was an awesome time!


no more abseiling then

There was a movie theatre in town, just the one, but it did have a red/maroon velour/velvet entrance, with canvas hammocks for sitting and a wooden floor for rolling empty drink bottles & jaffas down (I didn't, as I sat near the front). I remember seeing the first Star Wars movie there.


gone


school - lots of new buildings, and a few old memories

Do you remember when Pizza Hut was a hut? The stand-alone building marked a sense of occasion, where you could eat inside, rather than a characterless shopfront for just collecting. Well, it was over there. But I don't think we ever went. I do remember not wanting to eat pizza as it was just too weird. Seriously! I've got over that.


progress

My old street


house looks the same, I wonder if they still have the brown carpet, it wouldn't have worn out

Ah, the things you remember. A couple of weeks into the new school year I crashed my bike at the bottom of this hill - it's a hard right, hard left & another hard right, but I didn't even make the first one this time. I woke up in the ambulance with concussion, a broken collar bone and a couple of weeks off school to watch the cricket on tv. So not all bad then!


ouch

Just down the road from here was the take-away shop that had, wait for it, pinball machines AND computer games. But I couldn't go there, I just wasn't tough/cool enough - some of the boys even had ear-rings and smoked.


too cool for me

And now for another look-out. But this one used not to actually be a lookout. It was just a big hill with a communications (?) tower and a washed-out dirt track for access. So we would go up there in the old Land Rover, bouncing left & right, spitting rocks, in & out of drainage channels. It was great. And no permission required. But today it's a bitumen road that isn't even open.


more fun back in the day

And the Land Rover, a series 11a my father says, but I remember it as a series 3, was great for going to the drive-in movies too - plenty of space for deck chairs. But that's gone too.


gone, no more drive in movies

Time for one last photo - the old scout hut. Well, this is where it was.


gone too

That'll do for the history, I would have done more if I hadn't messed up the camera and wasted an hour as there is lots more to see - the ten pin bowling alley, skate rink, the supermarket where I had my first job, the alumina refinery & aluminium smelter, the beach (the other spot for fish and chips in the park by the beach like we did in the old days), the car dealer which had a Lamborghini Muira on display, the tennis club where I didn't go to school disco's (yes, they were called "discos" then), the soccer (yes, soccer) fields that have been taken over by the airport...


Hey, did your Dad ever make the joke about the cemetery being in the very middle of town?


the dead centre of town

On the far right are the 3 smoke stacks of the power station.

off to Calliope
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Now back to the riding...

West, cross the highway, through Calliope and west again towards Biloela. Then wonder about that side road that went direct to Monto. And stop to check the map. Hmm, that looks more interesting. There is a bit of dirt, but the map is quite old, so surely it's bitumen by now. Surely! I turned around, passing on the Sunday night delights of Biloela and went straight to Monto. It was worth it! You'll have to trust me on this, and it was worth it. Winding roads through farmland and forest, following the river between the mountains, through a few small villages (Ubobo was the biggest) & past several fantastic looking camping reserves and onto Builyan for a break, as I saw the shop was open. And they had cake & choccy milk.


time for break


travel food, now this is travel food

And on to Many Peaks then through the Glassford State Forest towards Kalpowar. Smooth road, rolling hills heading up into the mountain, very little traffic, warn but not hot. It's about as good as it gets.


new river crossings, but old gravel road

And the bitumen did end, but the gravel was thin, and the foundation was mostly smooth with just a few rocks & corrugations, so it was actually easy.


looking downstream on one of the many new river crossings


upstream into the hills

Sorry, I couldn't stop for more photo's, sometimes you just need to ride.

It was wonderful, one of the best afternoons I've ever had riding.



And then down the range, through more grazing land and into Monto to the caravan park for a room - they have a pool, so the decision was easy!

After a leisurely swim, it was off to the Grand Hotel for a feed and a cold beer - I didn't risk the steak and went for "old faithful" the chicken parmy. It didn't disappoint!



Today's map

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So, this will be Monday then. Day 4. But as I'm away riding it's not really a Monday at all...

Monto has things to look at, so I go for a look.

A building. Art Deco style, no less.


council offices

And then up the hill to the water tower.


the water tower, on the top of the hill


titled "Fun and Freedom"

And now back to the road for some more fun & freedom, but first


put the key in. no I'm not so old that I need one of those "proximity" electric keys, or am I?

And because it's Monto, the rains come (same as they did on the way north).


the back streets of Monto

Windmills. Did you try to keep your kids busy with the windmill game - I think it was just a counting competition. Problem. The windmills are being replaced with sunmills, and they just don't look as interesting, plus you can't see them working. And birds can't nest in them.


more progress - solar-powered water pumps

The rain was just enough to remind me of what rain is, but as it was a warm morning and only going to get hotter, I didn't bother with the rain liner. Getting a bit wet wouldn't be a problem today. So I just rode on, rolling through the grazing & cropping lands, listening to a few tunes and reading roadside advisory signs. I wish that they (the government) would stop with the ALL CAPS, there's no need to shout, and regular writing is much easier to read - particularly when glancing at road signs [rant over].


"DON'T DIE ON RURAL ROADS"

There's a bit of grain grown around here, so there are also grain silos beside the old railway line. The railway to the coast was completed in September 1928, but eventually, the trains ceased and the railway line became completely unused after the last train, a celebratory journey on an old steam train, which came through from Monto to Maryborough in 2005 - thanks again Wikipedia.


taking a photo of the silos


the painting depicts two stories of the "3 Moon" legend

Here are the stories https://www.australiansiloarttrail.com/three-moon



shed - check day 2 for northbound photo

While we are thinking of legends & mysteries... There are (supposedly?) many unknown and rarely seen creatures living & hiding around here. They struggle to survive now that most of the real bush has been cleared, but occasionally, just occasionally, they stumble across humans.


a warning for visitors & locals alike


Aboriginals tell the story of fearsome booming monsters...


a Bunyip, don't say you haven't been warned

Don't doubt what you don't know - https://montomagic.com.au/the-bunyip-hole/

Sticking to the main road, the might A3, currently called the Burnett Highway, I rolled happily (& hopefully safely) south.





$15.23 for fuel at Goomeri and some more travel food, and the thought of a pie at the bakery in Blackbutt.




a lot of pies in that load

My favourite bakery


yum, pie time
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Lunch - done
Ride - more please

OK. Keep going east...


did your Dad ever...


9 axles, 34 wheels

It's getting closer, but the homeward run is still an hour away. There are 2 more "things" to do.

1. Ride down a hill
2. Search for another "mythical" creature

The hill

not long, but what it lacks in quantity, it makes up for with quality


smooooth

I was going to show the video, but the speedo is too visible and I wouldn't want to encourage any of you to take liberties or enjoy riding.

Look, look! I see one.




got it!

The Kilcoy Yowie. There's a lot of thick & lush forest over the hills around here, which is perfect for the Yowie to hunt & hide. If you see a wild one, please report it here https://www.yowiehunters.com.au




Kilcoys' only traffic lights


Now it's time to go home.

But just one more picture...


Lake Somerset

Map


day 4

Tyre


sensible

Trip meter B


total trip distance

Thanks for joining in.

Stay safe, stay sane. Good Luck!
 
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