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Fast Forward / Must Watch 61

Here is a person that just amazes me , some of the roads she is on going into Bolivia is just beyond belief. Episode 61 is very unique as she goes down into a mine, there is a point where I can see she is starting to question her judgement, the miner guiding her helps in her foot placement. Something to realize she is video taping this, he reminds her to use both hands. She also has been making good use of her drone, some breathtaking shots.

Instead of posting updates on who said what , where and when, covid 19, why not watch some of her video's and give a thumbs up and possibly a little support wouldn't hurt.
 

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Latest Live Chat April 17, 2020

Here is a person that just amazes me , some of the roads she is on going into Bolivia is just beyond belief. Episode 61 is very unique as she goes down into a mine, there is a point where I can see she is starting to question her judgement, the miner guiding her helps in her foot placement. Something to realize she is video taping this, he reminds her to use both hands. She also has been making good use of her drone, some breathtaking shots.

Instead of posting updates on who said what , where and when, covid 19, why not watch some of her video's and give a thumbs up and possibly a little support wouldn't hurt.
I watched that live chat, over 1 hour, later her second half of the Evacuation video.
So I am guessing that the reaction that happened in Bolivia , Chile and Peru , much different than the USA & Canada, that I doubt if foreigners will be allowed back into the country even 6 months from now which is what Noraly was striving for her with her request to extend her import permit. Unless a Vaccine is found which they are now saying could be 2021 or 2022 , I think it could be very difficult. I think she went through something like 24 or more checkpoints over the distance from Lampa to Lima 1275 KM.
 

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What I am concerned about is her choice of the motorcycle for this and the earlier rides. That she has the willpower and physical strength to do them is a given.

The RE Himalayan was one of the most anticipated bikes in India. And when it was launched, the serious all terrain riders in India considered it to be the Indian version of the BMW GS family. And then, within just a few months of the deliveries by showrooms, the house came crashing down. Big, big time.

When I was in the market for a soft adv back in 2018 (after bidding a tearful farewell to my beloved 2014 model Bonnie), the Himalayan was in the reckoning but a very distant second to the BMW 310 GS. All on account of virtually every single parameter of motorcycle design, manufacture and service. And now, after about 15000 kms on the baby GS within 16 odd months of riding it, to include Ladakh and Kanyakumari, I shudder to think of what I might have been put through had I gone the cheapskate route with a Himalayan instead of the GS - in India, the 310 GS is more than twice the price of the Himalayan.

Either Noraly's bike is unique in the typical Royal Enfield tradition (10 bikes kaput within one kilometre of delivery to 1 bike going 100,000 kms without a hiccup) or there is something else to the story. Because, being resident in India and having followed the entire development of the H till its present form (leaking fuel tank welds, water in the instrument panel, tyres breaking the bead and going off the rim, broken Y junctions, dislodged forks, electrical failures, suspension failures et al and the subsequent soft recall and all the hassles that owners faced with THAT), I just simply cannot believe that her bike is as reliable as to be able to do these rides.

Her 10,000 km ridden video mentioned 9 separate issues with her first bike. All of them serious enough to turn her off from the model forever. Yet, she has persisted in riding what is unequivocally the most troublesome bike in India. Why so, only she or Royal Enfield or God know. No informed and serious long distance rider in India goes for this bike. Period.

Perhaps, the Himalayan is an Indophobe in that it treats a white Dutch American differently as compared to its own country cousins...
 

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What I am concerned about is her choice of the motorcycle for this and the earlier rides. That she has the willpower and physical strength to do them is a given.

The RE Himalayan was one of the most anticipated bikes in India. And when it was launched, the serious all terrain riders in India considered it to be the Indian version of the BMW GS family. And then, within just a few months of the deliveries by showrooms, the house came crashing down. Big, big time.

When I was in the market for a soft adv back in 2018 (after bidding a tearful farewell to my beloved 2014 model Bonnie), the Himalayan was in the reckoning but a very distant second to the BMW 310 GS. All on account of virtually every single parameter of motorcycle design, manufacture and service. And now, after about 15000 kms on the baby GS within 16 odd months of riding it, to include Ladakh and Kanyakumari, I shudder to think of what I might have been put through had I gone the cheapskate route with a Himalayan instead of the GS - in India, the 310 GS is more than twice the price of the Himalayan.

Either Noraly's bike is unique in the typical Royal Enfield tradition (10 bikes kaput within one kilometre of delivery to 1 bike going 100,000 kms without a hiccup) or there is something else to the story. Because, being resident in India and having followed the entire development of the H till its present form (leaking fuel tank welds, water in the instrument panel, tyres breaking the bead and going off the rim, broken Y junctions, dislodged forks, electrical failures, suspension failures et al and the subsequent soft recall and all the hassles that owners faced with THAT), I just simply cannot believe that her bike is as reliable as to be able to do these rides.

Her 10,000 km ridden video mentioned 9 separate issues with her first bike. All of them serious enough to turn her off from the model forever. Yet, she has persisted in riding what is unequivocally the most troublesome bike in India. Why so, only she or Royal Enfield or God know. No informed and serious long distance rider in India goes for this bike. Period.

Perhaps, the Himalayan is an Indophobe in that it treats a white Dutch American differently as compared to its own country cousins...
You don't have to worry about Noraly's chosen motorcycle. Keep in mind also that her first bike was in "Indian in country" Himalayan.

You can't base the exported Himalyan with the "in country" Himalayan. Also, we didn't start getting the Himalayan in the United states until late 2018 so the bugs from the earlier models were worked out. In the case of the US, every Royal Enfield motorcycle goes through an arduous inspection process by the importer in Texas before being distributed to the dealerships.

On the US Himalayan forums the few issues that folks have had were met with great response from Royal Enfield.

The Royal Enfield Himalayan in no way compares to the Kawasaki Versys 650 and is a totally different riding experience than the sport bike in adventure clothing Versys 300.

It is a simple, inexpensive, capable motorcycle that is a blast to ride when you stay within its limitations.

The fact that Noraly chose the Himalayan for her adventure definitely contributed to her fast rise in popularity because she is riding a bike that most can afford, she can get serviced or repaired in most countries, and it is really showing how good it is on her most recent journey.

I have only put 3200 trouble free miles on mine in the past year, but I only ride it when I know I am going to ride rough roads, gravel, and light trails. Even if mine is used up at 20,000 miles I would have gotten almost 7 years a enjoyment out of it.

The Kawasaki engines are pretty much designed and built to go 200,000 miles, but so few ever get anywhere close to that. People still mistakenly consider 25,000 miles a lot when looking at used bikes. LOL!
 

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...People still mistakenly consider 25,000 miles a lot when looking at used bikes. LOL!...
And ain't THAT the truth!

My '08 HAS 91,254 miles; my '09 HAD (when it was written-off) 62,790 kms [39K miles]; and my '15 HAS 75,209 kms [46,733 miles].

:grin2:
 

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There are a ton of Himalayan fans all over the place. Just this morning I'm watching a YouTube of a ride to Everest base camp. Lots of Brits riding them, Americans, and Asians. I haven't seen anything indicating the machine is less reliable than other moderately priced bike.

The big BMW is in a whole different class and price range. And I see it as a different mission than the RE Himalayan.

The reason Charles Lindbergh chose to fly a small single engine airplane across the Atlantic, to be the first person to do it solo non-stop, was the simplicity. One engine has half the chance of an engine failure than two engines. Simplicity is a virtue on a global adventure or when out in the wilderness beyond cell phone range. The Himalayan has less to go wrong than the complex BMW.

The Himalayan may yet find a spot in the garage. For my wife. That's my story and I'm sticking to it!
 

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...One engine has half the chance of an engine failure than two engines....
I flew singles, twins, threes as well as four-engines, and for ME - MORE is "mo-better"!:wink2:

Ended up w/ 23,000 hours, and NEVER "lost" an engine!

I seem to remember a quote from the head of Pan Am (way-back-when) when he was asked WHY he only flew on four-engine aircraft.... "Because there aren't any six-engine passenger aircraft!"

>:)
 

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I flew singles, twins, threes as well as four-engines, and for ME - MORE is "mo-better"!:wink2:

Ended up w/ 23,000 hours, and NEVER "lost" an engine!

I seem to remember a quote from the head of Pan Am (way-back-when) when he was asked WHY he only flew on four-engine aircraft.... "Because there aren't any six-engine passenger aircraft!"

>:)
:laugh:

I've never flown anything with more than 2 engines. I've had one failure in a piston single, one engine failure in a turboprop, and a runaway prop on a turboprop. More than my share of failures statistically!
 

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I'm late to the party as far as Noraly's channel goes... but it's great! My wife loves riding pillion (and I love when we ride together as well) and I think this channel will go a long way to helping her gain the confidence to get her license and ride by herself. I'm a fan of Japanese bikes but I've always thought t would be fun to have a RE in the garage; maybe my wife will choose one. Low seat height; easy to ride etc.

Also, Noraly is a far better rider than I am.
 

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" I am not flying with you based on your failure statistics.:wink2:
I am the luckiest pilot at my airline! Pre-disastered, so there should be no further failures.

Statistically a professional pilot expects one turbine engine failure in a career. I've actually had 2, the first I forgot about. It was a jet engine flying a corporate jet. So there would be zero chance of any further engine shutdowns. That's the way it works, right?
 

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I am the luckiest pilot at my airline! Pre-disastered, so there should be no further failures.

Statistically a professional pilot expects one turbine engine failure in a career. I've actually had 2, the first I forgot about. It was a jet engine flying a corporate jet. So there would be zero chance of any further engine shutdowns. That's the way it works, right?
If you say so Capt.:cheers:
 

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You don't have to worry about Noraly's chosen motorcycle. Keep in mind also that her first bike was in "Indian in country" Himalayan.

You can't base the exported Himalyan with the "in country" Himalayan. Also, we didn't start getting the Himalayan in the United states until late 2018 so the bugs from the earlier models were worked out. In the case of the US, every Royal Enfield motorcycle goes through an arduous inspection process by the importer in Texas before being distributed to the dealerships.

On the US Himalayan forums the few issues that folks have had were met with great response from Royal Enfield.

The Royal Enfield Himalayan in no way compares to the Kawasaki Versys 650 and is a totally different riding experience than the sport bike in adventure clothing Versys 300.

It is a simple, inexpensive, capable motorcycle that is a blast to ride when you stay within its limitations.

The fact that Noraly chose the Himalayan for her adventure definitely contributed to her fast rise in popularity because she is riding a bike that most can afford, she can get serviced or repaired in most countries, and it is really showing how good it is on her most recent journey.

I have only put 3200 trouble free miles on mine in the past year, but I only ride it when I know I am going to ride rough roads, gravel, and light trails. Even if mine is used up at 20,000 miles I would have gotten almost 7 years a enjoyment out of it.

The Kawasaki engines are pretty much designed and built to go 200,000 miles, but so few ever get anywhere close to that. People still mistakenly consider 25,000 miles a lot when looking at used bikes. LOL!
That's good to hear.

In fact, it corroborates what I have heard from friends who have ridden the bike here in India and then gone on to ride the US model in the US. Royal Enfield is super proactive in after sales service in Europe and the US while it is fully arrogant in India; the 350 and 500 models are the most powerful bikes that Indians can get at rock-bottom prices and this factor has assured RE of booming sales.

Personally, I cannot speak about the Euro and US specific models as I have not ridden them myself. But the Indian model? The lesser said, the better. In fact, the largest base of potential KTM 390 Adventure buyers will be of people who would have preferred to buy the Himalayan for a low price than take a loan to buy a 390 Adv, but for the simply atrocious overall quality.

twowheeladdict, you need to see and feel and ride the Indian model to understand just how shoddy it is...

Just read this. Trust me, I am an Indian, staying in India and I know what Royal Enfield is all about...

https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-issues-with-the-new-Royal-Enfield-Himalayan?share=1

https://www.change.org/p/suffering-major-problems-with-royal-enfield-himalayan

https://bikeadvice.in/re-himalayan-serious-engine-issues-other-severe-problems-reported/

https://www.facebook.com/RoyalEnfield/posts/1215484168494329
 

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There are a ton of Himalayan fans all over the place. Just this morning I'm watching a YouTube of a ride to Everest base camp. Lots of Brits riding them, Americans, and Asians. I haven't seen anything indicating the machine is less reliable than other moderately priced bike.

The big BMW is in a whole different class and price range. And I see it as a different mission than the RE Himalayan.

The reason Charles Lindbergh chose to fly a small single engine airplane across the Atlantic, to be the first person to do it solo non-stop, was the simplicity. One engine has half the chance of an engine failure than two engines. Simplicity is a virtue on a global adventure or when out in the wilderness beyond cell phone range. The Himalayan has less to go wrong than the complex BMW.

The Himalayan may yet find a spot in the garage. For my wife. That's my story and I'm sticking to it!
Those videos of Everest Base Camp, Leh, Nubra valley of Brits, Americans and Europeans, even Asians riding Himalayans are of tourists who hire the bikes in Leh or Manali just for the purpose. I met numbers of them in the Nubra valley, Diskit, Hundar, Thoise and Turtuk. Most on 350s, some on the Himalayan.

My BMW is the smallest model, the 310 GS and not the big 1200 or 1250. And it is in the exact same category as the 310 GS in terms of type although in a higher price bracket (which, BTW, sounded a near death knell for the bike in India).

Also, with the advent of Bharat Stage 6 emission norms, the BS6 Himalayan will be just as complex as the 310 GS with fuel injection, dual channel ABS. And with the kind of quality that RE pushes on to its less privileged customers who cannot afford the 390 Adv or 310 GS, the probability of it becoming a garage queen has increased dramatically.

Since both of us seem to have an aviation background, I don't want to start a war of words with you on Lindbergh's aircraft - it being custom-built for the flight etc. And the probability of both engines failing and refusing to relight, at once, is in the infinitesimal.

Best of luck with your Himalayan. You'll need lots of it:wink2:
 

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the probability of both engines failing and refusing to relight, at once, is in the infinitesimal.
Lindbergh was concerned if one engine failed that it wouldn't relight. Twins of the day wouldn't fly on just one engine, at least not across the ocean. No ETOPS back then! So an engine failure was a guarantee of going in the ocean even if it was a twin engined aircraft. Might as well halve the risk by only having one engine.
 

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...Also, Noraly is a far better rider than I am....
MAYBE but I get concerned every time she's riding on dirt holding a camera on a selfie-stick above her left shoulder.

NOT what I recommend....
 

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Some Serious Riding

MAYBE but I get concerned every time she's riding on dirt holding a camera on a selfie-stick above her left shoulder.

NOT what I recommend....
A good example of the selfie stick episode 49 starting about 13:20 , look at the rocks, this is just one example or Episode 59 at the start. I know I have seen photos Of Ed and His KLR fully loaded, this is some serious off road riding, by herself fully loaded. I wonder if she has something like the Garmin Inreach https://www.sportchek.ca/product/garmin-inreach-mini-orange-332770172.html?gclsrc=aw.ds&gclid=EAIaIQobChMInrzBvKOC6QIVQ18NCh0EyQa0EAQYASABEgJlw_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds#332770172=332770174
 

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What I am concerned about is her choice of the motorcycle for this and the earlier rides.
I'm not sure if it was a deliberate choice or just a coincidence, but when I was watching the episodes where she travels in post-USSR countries, I thought that she could not make a better choice of a bike to visit these countries.
Local goons would definitely be "interested" in anything with a BMW logo on its fuel tank, but not Royal Enfield.
I only heard about this manufacturer few months ago when I bought my first bike.
So my guess is that riding RE Himalayan gives her better chances of ending her journey still having a motorcycle and all expensive vlogging devices in her possession :)
 

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Re the selfie stick, if you look at her very first introduction to the trip before she mounts the bike (0.39 seconds) you will see an extension selfie stick attached to rear left bag area. I know she uses another stick all the time but hope that one attached to the bike is what she is using for those over the shoulder shots.
 
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