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Discussion Starter #1
What are the break in procedues ?

I'm a KLR guy and rememberer something keep revs under 4k for 500 miles

Is the Versys the same ?

What about stator output ?,,can you run heated gear ?,,Aux Lights ?

Thanks
 

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I highly recommend you follow the break in instructions in your manual.
Failure to do so may cost you if there is a warranty issue that crops up.
 

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I highly recommend you follow the break in instructions in your manual.

Failure to do so may cost you if there is a warranty issue that crops up.
How could they possibly know whether or not the procedure was followed?

The way my dealership explained things to me, don't lug it and don't wring it out for the first 500 miles. Fasteddie has a 50 mile procedure that seems to have served him well.

Both of the videos (from fairly reputable sources) say that the whole break in thing with modern manufacturing is essentially bunk.

But, I mean, you aren't hurting anything by following any particular procedure... Kind of like going to church when you don't believe in a god, right?
 

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My dealership say this when they bring motorbike to me:
First 800km don't go more than 6000rpm, second 800km don't go more than 8000 rpm.
I read whole manual before first ride, and I see that manual say first 800km maximum 4000rpm second 800km max 6000 rpm.

So I use middle:

First 800km no more than 5000 rpm, second 800km no more than 7000 rpm.
Everything is OK with bike, I change in breaking period a lot of time gears. From 1-6 and from 6-1. Going to place where is really low traffic, and then from 1-6 and from 6-1 about 20 minutes riding like that, and than normal ride.
Near my home it is little hill where I can ride uphill in little bigger rpm, and for downhill I use only engine braking.

That is how I drived my baby in breaking period
 

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The whole break-in process is a hold over from when manufacturing tolerances were ‘about there should do’ and dino oil was best one could get. These days it is more about the rider learning the bike and lawyers trying to reduce liability.

Personally, I’d warm up the engine by riding conservatively for about 10 min, then ride it “like I stole it” for an hour or so. Hard acceleration and engine braking, with many full throttle pulls to the red line. Then change the oil and filter, using full synthetic MA2 rated oil (like Motul 7100) and a good filter. Also add a magnet to the oil drain plug while it is out.

Then enjoy a healthy engine that runs strong and clean.
 

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Anyone remember when Castrol was the oil to avoid during a rebuild break-in? Something about it being too slippery, if I recall correctly.

Not sure, though... That was before my entry into the profession.
 

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As you can see, there’s a “range” of ideas on how to break in an engine.

Personally, I’d follow the manufacture recommendations.

That served me well with my Yamaha FZ6 that I owned from new, 2006 - 2019. Covered 46,000 miles and the engine never missed a beat. Sold it to buy the 2015 Versys 650 LT earlier this year.

All the best,
Dave
 

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How could they possibly know whether or not the procedure was followed?

The way my dealership explained things to me, don't lug it and don't wring it out for the first 500 miles. Fasteddie has a 50 mile procedure that seems to have served him well.

Both of the videos (from fairly reputable sources) say that the whole break in thing with modern manufacturing is essentially bunk.

But, I mean, you aren't hurting anything by following any particular procedure... Kind of like going to church when you don't believe in a god, right?

Tell you what, I will follow my manuals when I buy MY new bike with MY money and leave the internet advice to others. If this bothers you for some reason then that is your problem. No one here pays my bills or service fees.
 

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Tell you what, I will follow my manuals when I buy MY new bike with MY money and leave the internet advice to others. If this bothers you for some reason then that is your problem. No one here pays my bills or service fees.
Odd that you take offense to my opinion. Might want to look into that.
 

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First Class Trained Kawsaki Mechanic / Head mechanic

Tell you what, I will follow my manuals when I buy MY new bike with MY money and leave the internet advice to others. If this bothers you for some reason then that is your problem. No one here pays my bills or service fees.
First, yes there is lots of controversy, you mention your bike your money, as in you took offense and imply your way is the right way and also the manual says so. Well there are mistakes in the manual, follow the valve shim instructions and you may destroy your engine, go after Kawasaki because they made a mistake in the manual. Oh , us riders shouldn't be doing that work, wrong, history for me using dealer mechanics, usually the bike comes back missing bolts, improperly torqued bolts, not running the way it should. There is a exception, my 2015 dealer is in Delhi Ontario, 100 KM from me , if they moved 300 KM farther I would still deal with them when there is a dealer within 20 KM of me, won't discuss or mention the name of that dealer, I won't even buy parts from them.

So my story, when I purchased my 2015 the head mechanic told me that within the first 50 KM to take the motor all over the RPM range with short bursts to 8000 RPM, never ride for more than a couple minutes at a sustained RPM, that is don't ride at a constant 4000 RPM , also to engine brake , same way just don't hit 8000 RPM engine braking. He told me he would know if I followed his instructions. What is really funny is his brother is a salesman as is his Dad , both told me what is in the manual, to use the Kawasaki oil for the first 6000 KM.

So on the first service I talked to the head mechanic again, yes I paid for the service because I really like their honesty and I got a tremendous deal, and continue to get discounts on any parts I need. During that service he told me that the motor is almost 100% broke in at the factory, babying it could result in improper seating of the rings, thus the need for higher RPM and engine braking. He also told me that I could have run full synthetic oil right from the start, when I questioned what his Dad and brother said, he smiled>:) and said, they sell the bikes, I am the guy trained by Kawasaki and service them.

I followed his advice, I have 30,000 KM on the bike now, using mobil 1 15W50 , I returned the 4 liters of Kawasaki mineral oil back in 2016 and got a full refund. Yes my bike and my money, with only 5 Km on the bike, I had removed the shunt regulator, removed the OEM T stat , modified the cooling system with my original ThermoBob , last count was over 10 times draining the cooling system and changes.
I am a facts and reason kind of guy, because it is in print and says don't go above this RPM, I want to know why, the same goes when someone says don't baby it, explained to me as to the why, the video's posted and motoman break in etc. , according to my head mechanic are 100% correct, my saying it doesn't make it so, however you need to ask yorself when many of the members on here and I will use Fasteddie as a example, 3 Kawsaki Versys , MK-1 to MK-3 all done the same way, my 2007 and 2015 the same, many others here. Nothing worse than trying to ride in a 100 KM / HR zone and following the manual, not possible to reach 100 KM/HR at 4000 RPM Nothing like a hazard on the road. Anyway my bike my money and my way of doing things. Thanks for your opinion.
 

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...I will use Fasteddie as a example, 3 Kawasaki Versys , MK-1 to MK-3 all done the same way, my 2007 and 2015 the same, many others here. Nothing worse than trying to ride in a 100 KM / HR zone and following the manual, not possible to reach 100 KM/HR at 4000 RPM Nothing like a hazard on the road. Anyway my bike my money and my way of doing things....
FWIW - after using the Motoman break-in (Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power) on the ride home from the dealer where I'd JUST taken possession of a NEW V650 (THREE times - an '08, an '09, and a '15) then changed oil and filter when I got home (after about 50 MILES each time), I have about 173,522 trouble-free miles on that V650 engine: 88,3xx miles on the '08; 62,790kms [39,016miles] on the '09 when it was an insurance write-off in '15; and 74,361 kms [46,206 miles] on my '15.

A little background - I ran a motorcycle top-fuel drag-bike back in the '60s, w/ 12.5 to 1 compression pistons



- and my break-in procedure was to rev it to 7,000 rpm, then 'drop-the-clutch' at the GREEN light. NO other break-in procedure and using regular motor-oil w/ BARDAHL in it changed after each day of racing, and when I sold the engine to be used in a Triton road bike, it STILL had the same pistons AND rings in it!

 

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With "moderately" domed pistons like that, dog food clearance is an important check in the springtime, I imagine.
 

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I have 26,000 miles (41,000 KM) on my bike and it runs great, just like it did when new. I followed the break in process in the shop manual. I change my oil every 2000 miles and I use Kawasaki 10W40 motor oil. I have owned lots of bikes. One thing that I have found as a constant with bikes and with guns is some people always think they no better than the people, the engineers, that design their own products. Following other's advice has cost me dearly in the past. That is why I stick with what the manufacturer recommends when I pay thousands of dollars for a product.
 

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Fully agree

I have 26,000 miles (41,000 KM) on my bike and it runs great, just like it did when new. I followed the break in process in the shop manual. I change my oil every 2000 miles and I use Kawasaki 10W40 motor oil. I have owned lots of bikes. One thing that I have found as a constant with bikes and with guns is some people always think they no better than the people, the engineers, that design their own products. Following other's advice has cost me dearly in the past. That is why I stick with what the manufacturer recommends when I pay thousands of dollars for a product.
As in the title, however I will qualify a couple things. One just recently changed, the oil change interval , now 12000 KM between oil changes https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/1638695-post10.html.
So something I find is mistakes are copied year after year. That is the case with the service manual for 2007 through 2015 for the valve shim check, major mistake. I found that in my career, engineers would find what appeared to be the latest drawings and make revisions, only to find that six months later there was a mistake on that drawing. So I did mention my dealers Kawasaki head mechanic, yes the guy trained to work on the bike, I followed his direction which is contrary to the manual,I did question him as I owned a 2007 Versys and can read, he mentioned that if I followed the manual and kept it under 4000 RPM he would know, the same goes for staying at 6000 plus for a extended period, he went on and explained that the under 4000 RPM is the 1990's era and is primarily for people that think if you tell them 6000 RPM why not 9000 RPM.. This dealer services and sells Yamaha and they were approached by Kawasaki to do the same.
So your bike is broke in, so is my bike, I voided my warranty the first 5 KM technically, by adding the ThermoBob and the series regulator, I also hit 7000 to 8000 RPM for 15 second intervals. In 2018 before the ECU flash I hit the rev limiter at least 5 times that year, unintentionally. Now if you really want to get worried , own a DRZ400S , yes a requirement is to wear ear plugs and be partially deaf as I am, simply because it sounds like the motor is coming apart any second. I have been on this forum over 10 years, that motor is almost bullet proof.
There has been a case of improper brake in , no fault of the owner, and covered under warranty, earlier this year, I think it was a X300 that was going through oil. You are absolutely correct in not following what is on the internet, however as a professional talking to a licensed professional ( the head mechanic ) and asking the right questions with the right answers, I chose to follow his advice.
 

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With all the talent on this forum (fasteddie, who has DECADES of relevant experience, onewizard, who researches EVERYTHING to the point that he probably very literally knows too much, me, with my ASE Master Automobile Technician certificates (plus L1), Steve, who actually goes out of his way to provide superior ECM programming for all things Versys), I am amazed at the expression of contempt for the opinions provided.

I even backed my "opinion" with virtually identical ideas from motorcycle.com and Fortnine.

The people on this forum simply are not your typical internet keyboard warriors. We may disagree with each other from time to time on certain details, but we ultimately respect each other AND EACH OTHER'S OPINIONS.
 

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without adding a title, i thought of a really good example, it is related to the stator testing, and the term choke / reactor . Choke when used in a AC circuit to pass DC , reactor to use in a AC frequency drive circuit.

https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjQupSRkM3mAhVnm-AKHR4zBiUQFjAAegQIAxAB&url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choke_(electronics)&usg=AOvVaw3h9Y69tWveisqq56HYUbkL
https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiM8cyrkM3mAhVMnOAKHfBWCooQFjAAegQIARAB&url=https://www.controldesign.com/vendornews/2015/when-to-use-an-ac-or-dc-choke-and-why/&usg=AOvVaw0LkqwQqh3rvltL2JxfA22F

For years the manufacturer of a leak detector ( this is to protect human life from being electrocuted so extremely important) used a ohmmeter to measure their 12 Henry chokes at 115 ohms, I found that to be inaccurate, just like the service manual says to use a ohmmeter also very crude compared to my method of 2000 RPM and a digital AC voltmeter. My first design was very crude, I had a 75 watt clamp lamp at 120 VAC connected to a 120 VAC cord from a old emergency light unit, from the neutral I connected one end of the choke, the other end went to my Fluke meter which was connected to measure AC amps, from the other meter lead I connected this to the other prong of the clamp light. The 75 watt clamp light was my current limiting source, so a shorted choke the light would be full brilliance and about 0.65 amp . So some technical data, a good choke using 60 HZ at 120 VAC was 0.009 amp, a bad choke which happened to measure the same 115 ohms was 0.9 amp. So the good choke was ten times higher in resistance, or the bad choke was 1/10 the resistance of what it should have been. Yes there was lots of head shaking by maintenance staff, there I am on the melt deck with wires, jumpers and meters, later I purchased a LCR meter and just before I retired I upgraded to a superior LCR meter.
So as a professional I will stand behind my stator testing and say it is superior to anything else out there, one day Kawasaki will include my test method , is it in the manual, NO, would I bother using a ohmmeter, only if I could smell it burnt and my battery was dead and I couldn't start my bike.

Last and it should have been the first. This forum is like no other, you post a problem, expect a response the same day, within hours or minutes. And yes there are some really talented /professional people on this forum, without those people I wouldn't be here, my 07 was about to be sold by me two months after I started riding it. @invader saved the day.
 

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I am sure this is a great forum. Being new here, having only popped in a few times, I do not know who knows what regarding anything on this forum. I am sure you folks are great. You can continue to be great without my input.

Please have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Pat Riot, Out.
 

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The whole break-in process is a hold over from when manufacturing tolerances were ‘about there should do’ and dino oil was best one could get. These days it is more about the rider learning the bike and lawyers trying to reduce liability.

Personally, I’d warm up the engine by riding conservatively for about 10 min, then ride it “like I stole it” for an hour or so. Hard acceleration and engine braking, with many full throttle pulls to the red line. Then change the oil and filter, using full synthetic MA2 rated oil (like Motul 7100) and a good filter. Also add a magnet to the oil drain plug while it is out.

Then enjoy a healthy engine that runs strong and clean.
I spent decades as a professional engine builder. This is very close to the method I ended up using for many of the years, once I wasn't afraid of premature explosions .:surprise: The only real difference is that I give increasing amounts of throttle, to full therottle, but keep the rpms below redline. the coast down and hard engine braking to pull the rings up and bed the rings to hold higher vacuum and control oil. The hard pulls always start at an rpm high enough to ensure that there was sufficient oil pressure. On this 650 engine, I would start the hard accelss at about 4000 rpm and shut down at 8000 rpm. over and over. That's how I broke in my 2015 v650. when I had done that until I felt I had sufficiently bedded the rings it was full WFO throttle and never looking back. My bike ran great.
BTW, there is no gain or downside to breakin with synthetic oil, except that if you drain after 50 miles or so and then again at 500 (like you should and I did) draining expensive synthetic kinda hurts in the wallet area. Steve
 
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