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I will be taking a two week ride out west this summer on my Versys and want to enjoy the ride but I am not sure what mods to make as I have never ridden more than 300 miles in a day and that was a one day ride. My Versys is an 09' with under 2,500 miles so no need to replace wear items. I already have mirror and peg relocators, a tank bag, a Givi screen, comfortable grips, and my seat was modified by Spencer. I need help in the following areas.
1- Luggage- I will be buying a Givi V46 top case but can't afford hard side cases. What soft/weather proof saddlebags do you recommend for long rides?
2- Comfort- My knees aren't the best, and while the footpeg relocators are great I need a little more stretch. How are the cruiser peg mounts from Motowerk?
3- Electrical- I need a power outlet for the bike but I'm not sure which one is best and where to mount it.
4- Gear- This is for those who live out west. I will be traveling through Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana, and the Dakota's. How will I need to dress for a June ride factoring in a stop at Glacier National Park? I have a great three season jacket. I am hoping a good rain jacket on top will get me through Glacier.

Thanks for any advice. I tried to search for answers but my questions go in too many directions.
 

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1- Luggage

How about this:
http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Tail/beta_bags11.html
Or you can get a normal, large duffle bag from Wolfman, Ortlieb, North Face, Seal Line etc.

3- Electrical-
http://www.powerlet.com/shop-by-product/socket-kits/SKTKIT
http://www.easternbeaver.com/Main/main.html

4- Gear-
Quality base layers are useful in all kinds of weather. They pack small, wash and dry quickly. Worth the expense in my opinion.
I've heard good reports about this company recently: http://www.mountainhardwear.com/mens-base-layer/mens-baselayer,default,sc.html
Decent rain suit. I prefer two piece.
More then one pair of gloves.
Merino wool socks.


I'd recommend a front fender extender, hand guards and crash bars. Upgrade and improve stock tool kit. Tire plug kit if you are traveling in remote places. Small battery jumper cables. Assemble a medical kit that you know how to use and that is suited to your needs instead of those pre-packaged. Throttle Rocker.


Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info. I hadn't even thought about a first aid kit. I thought aout the hand guards but wonder if I will want them on a warm, summer ride. Thoughts?
 

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You can usually remove the wind deflector from hand guards. Important bit is the metal 'spine' that protects your levers and handlebars.

If one is not medically inclined (i.e. knowledge and desire to help people in life threatening situations) then medicine kit should include simple stuff for personal use. Antibiotic and antifungal ointments, cold medicine (Russian works best :)), anti-diarrhea pills, duct tape and some gauze, syringe needles are good for splinters, blister bandaids, etc. This sort of things will threat and prevent small troubles that may escalate and ruin your trip otherwise.
 

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Sounds like you have a very good start on the important mods. You might want to also consider:
- rear tire hugger (or other method) to protect electronics
- flat foot for side-stand
- fender extender to protect radiator
- 12 volt outlet for tire pump and other stuff

Last year I rode my '09 V from Charleston to Montana (6,733 miles) and loved it. The V was the smallest/lightest bike that I've ridden for this type of a trip. I was able to go places that I would never have taken a BMW RT. My only issue was wind. I got beat up going across NM/TX and on the return across SD.

FWIW, be really careful in the amount of stuff you pack. After a week on the road you should have a good sense of what you need and don't need. Many of us have shipped stuff back home in the midst of a tour.
 

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If you're going to Glacier to ride the Going to the Sun road, you'll want to keep an eye on the park website. The road opens on different dates every year depending on the snowpack. Last year it opened on July 13. In 2010, it opened just before I got there in early July. I had 5 days of perfect weather riding out there and then it poured rain on the day I rode through the park.

Be aware that it can snow in the mountains in June. You should be OK with 3 season gear, but be prepared for some cold. The trick is to layer up. You can add or shed layers as the temp changes. You should certainly have a full set of rain gear, jacket and pants or one piece, waterproof boots or boot covers and waterproof gloves or glove covers. It's truly miserable to be cold and wet. Your rain gear can also help to keep you warm by being a windproof layer even when it isn't raining.

You don't need to take two weeks worth of clothes. A couple of layers of wicking gear is all you need. You can wash out your stuff in the sink and it will dry overnight. Out west, it will dry in an hour. Put it on and ride the next day.

The bike is so new that you should have no problem with it. You should have a tire plug kit and a pump of some kind and your chain lube and be able to adjust the chain. For anything that the bike tool kit won't suffice, you can buy along the way if you need it.

The one tool I consider indispensible on a trip is my laptop. I use it for route planning, weather monitoring, finding accommodations, checking road conditions and keeping in touch with my family.
 

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I'm selling a saddlemen bag on ebay right now that I know fits on a V, used it on one vacation. Works great as a backrest, something I would suggest along with some form of cruise pegs. I actually built a backrest and don't need this bag for that function anymore. A windscreen and good helmet will do wonders for you on long trips. Oh, and earplugs too. Just don't forget the sunscreen at the last hotel.









Oh . . . . .always prepare for the worst.
 

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I had a cheapo soft saddlebags that came with a waterproof cover, lost one of them in my tour and remove the other one and they looked better that way. I wrap the contents in a plastic bag to waterproof the internals, so far, things worked out ok. And you certainly need some kind of bracket for the soft saddle bags to keep them from sagging into the tire. I made mine out of Aluminum hanger and zip tie them to the Givi Rack. Easy to bend and shape them. Looked ugly but suited for the long trip.

Pack the rain coat if your 3 season jacket has never been tested in prolonged rain riding. I have a jacket with removable water proof liner. All dry except it leaked moisture where the zippers are. A good riding rain coat is wonderful, keeps you 100% dry and warm. Did u have waterproof gloves? Good to have one. Waterproof tall riding boots is another must have (those that have liners like GoreTex or Aerotex etc). Bring extra socks just in case. I brought along my Crocs for off-riding walking :)

Be sure to lube up the clutch cable, gear linkage, and hope you also have a way to lube the chain. Some tire puncture repair kit would be good to have, as well as a mini air pump.

Wish I can do the trip with you. Have fun!
 

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I really recommend a heated jacket liner. It actually reduces the amount of gear you need to take... seems expensive up front, but you can find deals if you shop. I found a Powerlet on Ebay (same as first gear/warm and safe) for about $130. Best investment you'll make, and you'll need it even in the summer in the mountains where you are heading. I just picked up some heated gloves too, but with hand guards and good waterproof gloves, you may not need them. it helped that the previous owner of my bike had already installed a controller on the dash... that's another expense, and necessary.
I rode my V 4K miles in October, through every type of weather including snow...
 

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After you get your tire repair kit make sure you know how to use it and that it's complete. Best way is to actually plug a tire. Mine didn't come with small pliers for extracting nails or a small razor for cutting the plug flush. I also couldn't get my co2 pump to work.

Check your clutch cable to make sure there are no signs of fray and put some fresh grease on the end. Some people like to carry an extra cable.
 

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Used the scala on a long day trip before, very nice to listen to music with. You just have to make sure you have a way to charge it every night.

The battery last for alittle over 10 hours on my Scala Q2. I use this when the battery dies you can listen to music while its charging.. http://www.amazon.com/Scala-Rider-Car-Charger/dp/B0012TUEDG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328944125&sr=8-1

Have the Ipod Schuffle its small.Only $49.00 and hold about 200 songs. http://www.apple.com/ipodshuffle/ I clip it onto my riding jacket. The Scala Riders come with a cord to use an MP3 player or Ipod. Works great for when your in areas with bad reception

You can see the Ipod clip onto my jacket in the photo.
 

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Give me a day or two before you go buying a Scala unit! I moved a few months ago, but I still have a 2-pack of the Scala Rider units in the box. I bought them slightly used a few years ago, but never used them because my phone at the time (Sony Walkman, with the mp3 player app) wasn't compatible with them. I forget if it was that generation Scala or the phone that lacked the A2DP protocol. If the Scala has that protocol, they're good for streaming music, and I can give you a smoking deal. I'm loving my Sena SMH-10's these days. I'll PM you when I find the Scala units, probably by this Monday (I work nights/weekends and this weekend is busier than usual).
 

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Some people don't like throttlelocks - I do for long trips. One of the first things I'll add to a bike.

Wolfman makes a great dry duffel. I saw the givi at the motorcycle show today and it was very light - they claim it is waterproof too.
 
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