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Discussion Starter #1
Sucks, I picked up a nail in my rear tire on Versys. It has a really slow leak, didn't realize the nail was even there until this weekend when I wanted to take it for a ride and the rear tire was down to about 20psi. I just bought these Michelin Road tires mid last season. I don't believe they can be salvaged for long term use, can they?
 

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Depends on what you mean by long term. Mine lasted at best 12k miles, but that's less than a year for me. You can patch it from the inside, and that's generally considered a permanent repair. I've had good luck with patches.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good to know. Would hate to have to get rid of these tires when they are so new. I've not been riding my Versys as much since Covid as it's my long distance bike and all three of my road trips were cancelled this year.
 

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I'm sure others here would disagree about patches, for various reasons. Like I said, I've used them and will again.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No, it's not on the sidewall, dead center lodged in one of the grooves.
 

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Back when i had my Versys 650. I had just put a set of PR3's on it. Went out to Malibu to Neptune's Net and The Snake. Picked up a nail in the rear tire tire had less than 90 miles on it. It wasn't leaking so rode it out the rest of the ride and the next day pulled out my tire plugging kit and air compressor. Fixed it and rode with that tire for almost 10,000 miles then sold the bike. Never had an issue with the plug.
 

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I removed a small nail from a rear tire, installed a plug, then ran it till it was "worn-out". I kept a pretty good "eye" on it thru out that period.
 

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I've used the sticky worm type plugs a few times, and rode 1000's of miles on 'em. Never even had a slow leak.
 

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Michelin Pilot Roads are the best rain tires I have ever used. They also picked up a nail in the rear on every single tire I have run. My local tire shop will put a vulcanized patch on the inside for cash only "no paper trail" because they say they are not supposed to patch motorcycle tires. Heck, they don't even sell motorcycle tires.

Sure is nice living in a state that has mountains to go riding in. I've already done several trips socially isolating in the southeastern mountains.
 

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I’ve used the sticky worm plugs on the rear tires of my old FZ6 and my recent 650 LT. Worked very well, no issues.
Dave
 

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OK... I've been seeing a lot of action here on the cheap string-type plug kits, and I have to agree, they do work... Up to a point. My personal experience with them has been as follows:

Small punctures, up to about the size of a 10 penny nail, great. I've personally used them to get me down the road in tires as small as Mazda 626 size and as large as a big-rig grossed out at 80.000 lbs. They've never failed me for small punctures.

Anything larger than a 10p nail, however, was critically unsafe, especially on a motorcycle. I had to use 2 strings to seal the hole (folded in half, effectively 4 strings) and run reduced tire pressure (20 psi) AND limit my speed to no more than 55 mph in order to get the bike home. Once home, the plug, still holding air pressure, was almost all the way out of the tire and basically fell out with a very light tug.

Very scary stuff. I bought a rubber plug kit immediately. Here's a link to the kit that lives under my seat:

 

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With the sticky worm plugs, I've always had to use the rasp tool to even get the hole capable of accepting the plug. For any type of slit or larger/irregular hole, the worm plug should definitely be considered temporary only. As hard as those damn things are to push in, it should be very obvious. And I would never trust one that had to be doubled up.
 

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Always had good results using the sticky worms. Certainly worth carrying them for emergencies! I also found a "Slime" tee handle insertion tool that is a combo reamer and inserter so I only need to carry a single tool (Walmart). Can't seem to find it on their website but they were in the store for 3 bucks! (I cut the handle down a little for compactness)
179967
 

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